Your Unnecessary, But Must-Have Accessory Fix

Your Unnecessary, But Must-Have Accessory Fix
Although we don’t usually need to spend hundreds of dollars on an accent accessory, it’s easy to be convinced to splurge on a small, stylish find.  From Fendi furry key chains to Louis Vuitton notebooks to Gucci phone covers, these tiny extras make huge fashion statements.

Keep on reading: Your Unnecessary, But Must-Have Accessory Fix
Source: V Magazine

Your Unnecessary, But Must-Have Accessory Fix

This Photo Shows a Solar Coronal Mass Ejection with the Earth for Scale

This Photo Shows a Solar Coronal Mass Ejection with the Earth for Scale

Space enthusiast and photo processing hobbyist Jason Major created this edit of a NASA photo showing a ginormous coronal mass ejection back on June 7th, 2011. See that little blue circle in the upper-left-hand corner? That’s the Earth for scale.

Here’s a video of the same coronal mass ejection:

Coronal mass ejections are like solar flares on a massive scale — while solar flares are seen as little eruptions on the Sun’s surface, coronal mass ejections can be bigger than the Sun itself. They’re caused when solar plasma caught in a loop in the Sun’s magnetic field violently breaks out of the loop and blasts into space.

For the image above, Major took a photo captured by NASA’s SDO spacecraft, rotated the view, and inserted the Earth to show just how large the prominence was.

(via Jason Major via Digg)


Image credits: Courtesy of NASA/SDO and the AIA, EVE, and HMI science teams. Edited by J. Major and licensed under CC BY-NC-SA 2.0


Source: PetaPixel

This Photo Shows a Solar Coronal Mass Ejection with the Earth for Scale

Patti is 3 Legged Thing’s First Tripod to Feature Flip-Locking Legs

Patti is 3 Legged Thing’s First Tripod to Feature Flip-Locking Legs

The British tripod maker 3 Legged Thing has announced a new Punks-series tripod called Patti. It’s the company’s first ever tripod to feature flip-lock legs rather than the friction locks found on all the other models.

The new tripod is named after punk rock musician Patti Smith, making it the first 3 Legged Thing tripod named after a female rockstar.

Despite weighing just 3.4 pounds (1.55kg), Patti is capable of supporting up to 22 pounds (10kg) of camera gear thanks to its new leg locking mechanism. The flip locks are made of durable ABS plastic and help secure the legs in position with a single smooth action.

“Perfect for photographers of multiple genres, and adaptable to a wide variety of situations, Patti is an ideal starter tripod for users of compact, bridge, mirrorless, and lightweight DLSR cameras,” 3 Legged Thing says.

The Patti comes with an AirHed Mini, a simplified ballhead with just two controls: the release plate clamp knob and a combined panning/ballhead tension knob.

Other features and specs including an aircraft-grade magnesium alloy build, a single-section center column that’s removable/reversible, 3 leg angles (23/55/80 degrees), shooting as low as 4.25 inches (11cm) from the ground, and a length of 17.7 inches (45cm) when folded and 5.33 feet (1.63m) when extended.

Patti will be available in two colors (grey with copper accents and matte black with green accents) for $120 (the company’s lowest price thus far for a full-size tripod) starting on September 15th, and pre-orders can be placed now on the 3 Legged Thing website and through retailers such as B&H and Adorama.


Source: PetaPixel

Patti is 3 Legged Thing’s First Tripod to Feature Flip-Locking Legs

A Secret Rule of Photo Composition: The Middle Line

A Secret Rule of Photo Composition: The Middle Line

Here’s a short 4-minute video by Light Club that looks at using a vertical or horizontal middle line through the frame, something it refers to as “a secret rule of photo composition.”

Examples given in the video show how both photographers and artists throughout history have created compelling compositions by placing their subjects and scenes along the middle line (e.g. portrait photographers placing one of the subject’s eyes directly on the line).

The rule of thirds proposes that placing points of interest off the middle lines helps produce tension and interest, but this video argues that “there’s magic in the middle.”


Source: PetaPixel

A Secret Rule of Photo Composition: The Middle Line

What Do Elon Musk and Azealia Banks Have in Common?

What Do Elon Musk and Azealia Banks Have in Common?
Whither Elon Musk? The billionaire explorer has gone dark on Twitter following an active weekend on social media in which he claimed that Tesla’s merch line would soon be launching “Short shorts,” spawning a fury of speculation about whether or not the Tesla and SpaceX founder would be investing in clout-forward fashion. (The tweets that followed, including “S3XY,” “What are your fav short shorts?” and “Paired with thigh-high sockboots,” only added to the inexplicability of the…

Keep on reading: What Do Elon Musk and Azealia Banks Have in Common?
Source: V Magazine

What Do Elon Musk and Azealia Banks Have in Common?

The Rear Layout of Nikon’s Full Frame Mirrorless Camera

The Rear Layout of Nikon’s Full Frame Mirrorless Camera

Nikon’s teasers for its upcoming full-frame mirrorless camera have largely been looks at the front and sides of the camera. Here’s a look at what the back will likely be like.

Nikon Rumors published the diagram above, writing that it’s a drawing made by a photographer who has used/seen/tested the camera out in the field.

“As you can see from the sketch, the back layout is similar to most Nikon DSLR cameras with the exception that there are no buttons/controls on the left side of the screen,” Nikon Rumors writes. “The screen itself looks pretty big and there is also a comfortable/ergonomic thumbrest in the upper right corner.”

Just for reference, here’s what the backs of the Nikon D850 DSLR and Sony a7R III mirrorless camera look like:

What’s your reaction to the layout seen above?


What is your opinion about the rear layout seen in this illustration?


Source: PetaPixel

The Rear Layout of Nikon’s Full Frame Mirrorless Camera

Female Iranian Photographer Banned from Stadium Shoots Match from Roof

Female Iranian Photographer Banned from Stadium Shoots Match from Roof

Parisa Pourtaherian is a 26-year-old photographer in Iran who has a passion for shooting sports. The problem is, women are banned from entering soccer stadiums in her country for men’s matches. But Pourtaherian recently became the first female photographer to shoot a national league match, and she did it by climbing on top of a nearby roof.

The Guardian reports that for a match at Vatani stadium in the city of Ghaemshahr last month, Pourtaherian spent three hours searching for a nearby house with a rooftop that provided a view into the stadium.

She spent nearly the entire first half of the match trying to convince a homeowner to let her onto their roof. In the end, she found one that obliged.

A tree in between her roof and the stadium blocked some of the field from view, but the rooftop gave her a good enough view that Pourtaherian was able to cover the match between the clubs Nassaji Mazandaran and Zob Ahan with a telephoto lens.

Here are a few of the photos Pourtaherian ended up capturing from her unusual vantage point.

After the male photographers in the stadium spotted and snapped photos of Pourtaherian on the roof, their photos of her went viral in Iranian news and social media, where the subject of women attending male soccer matches has been a hotly debated political issue.

//www.instagram.com/embed.js

Pourtaherian says she hopes to one day be able to shoot top-tier Iranian soccer from the sidelines alongside male photographers.


Image credits: Photographs courtesy Parisa Pourtaherian and used with permission


Source: PetaPixel

Female Iranian Photographer Banned from Stadium Shoots Match from Roof

Sony’s Mirrorless Cameras are Winning Over the Pros: Bloomberg

Sony’s Mirrorless Cameras are Winning Over the Pros: Bloomberg

The ongoing battle over camera supremacy between Canon, Nikon, and Sony is receiving more mainstream attention in the business world. Bloomberg has published a report on the rise of Sony through its mirrorless cameras and states that Sony is now winning over professional photographers.

Sony has enjoyed a sizable lead in the booming mirrorless camera race thanks to its willingness to launch full-frame mirrorless cameras while Canon and Nikon largely twiddled their thumbs and continued focusing on their bread and butter DSLR businesses.

As a result, Sony is now chipping away at the duopoly’s lead in the $3.2 billion market of cameras geared toward professional photographers.

“Even so, adoption has been slow,” Bloomberg writes. “Pro shooters are a loyal bunch, sticking to familiar gear with proven reliability. They also make substantial investments in what they call glass, the assortment of interchangeable lenses that easily cost more than the camera body.

“Some pros say Sony hasn’t rolled out new lenses fast enough, and have complained that customer support has lagged behind Canon and Nikon.”

Sony is working hard to both expand its lens offerings and improve its support for photographers shooting its gear.

“We were aware from the beginning that [Sony cameras] would be for pros,” Sony product planning manager Hiroyuki Matsushita tells Bloomberg.

Sony’s focus on creating imaging sensors and dominating the business has caused record profits to pour into its coffers in recent days, and the company expects its camera business to grow its operating profits by up to 40% in just 3 years to nearly $1 billion, Bloomberg reports.

The company also said back in May that it’s aiming to be the top camera brand by 2021.

But whether Sony can continue to capitalize on its mirrorless lead and grow in its market share depends on how it fares upcoming competition that’s just around the corner: Nikon will be unveiling its full-frame mirrorless camera on August 23rd, and Canon is rumored to have one following close behind.


Source: PetaPixel

Sony’s Mirrorless Cameras are Winning Over the Pros: Bloomberg