This is Why You Need to Be Careful with Camera Clips

This is Why You Need to Be Careful with Camera Clips

Modern quick-release camera clips are designed to hold your camera firmly when it’s not needed while allowing it to detach easily when it is. But if there’s any equipment or user failure in the system, that failure could be catastrophic for your gear… and that’s what one photographer just found out the hard way.

A photographer who goes by SensualTomato online just shared his nightmare as a warning to other photographers using (or thinking of using) any camera clip.

The photographer had been using a Peak Design Capture Clip v2 (there system is on v3 now) for about 6 months prior to the incident without any issues.

This Peak Design photo shows how the Capture Clip is designed to safely hold your camera when it’s not in use.

On Thursday, he had his $1,600 Sony Alpha a7 II camera and $1,000 Sony Sonnar T* FE 55mm f/1.8 ZA lens mounted on his clip when he suddenly his camera kit fell out.

“I dunno if it was a straight up malfunction or user error or some combination of both,” the photographer tells PetaPixel. “I had the clip on my belt horizontally, which is not ideal since it slid out right onto the floor.

“After the first drop, I tightened everything on the clip, making sure it was tight enough to hold the camera with some give but made sure it was locked in. The clip is designed to give an audible ‘click’ noise when everything is locked, and after the first drop I triple checked everything was secure.”

About 30 minutes later, however, the clip dropped his camera again, and this time with catastrophic results.

“The force of the impact snapped the screws off of the backplate of the lens, scratching the rear element and damaging the body of the lens,” the photographer says. “Now, I’m still not sure how it happened, but I trust peak design’s other products and their sturdiness.

“It’s possible that while walking, the tension screws loosened, and after sitting down, the quick release was pressed down, unlocking the camera. Subsequently, walking with the clip caused the camera to fall. Or, the clip malfunctioned and the locking mechanism just failed.

“Either way, I’ve been using the clip for a long time before this happened, and having the clip fail twice in a day is a worrying design flaw.”

Since getting the lens repaired would cost many hundreds of dollars, he’s accepting it as a loss and is planning to replace it instead.

After SensualTomato shared his story and warning on Reddit, other photographers have shared similar experiences with camera clip failures, and a common cause appears to be various screws loosening (and sometimes falling out) over time without the photographer knowing.

So if you use a camera clip of any kind, you may want to give it a careful inspection every so often just to ensure that all the screws and parts are tight and sound.


Source: PetaPixel

This is Why You Need to Be Careful with Camera Clips

Dior Horses Around for Cruise 2019

Dior Horses Around for Cruise 2019
Yesterday evening, a seemingly endless stream of black cars descended upon the fairytale town of Chantilly, roughly 25 miles north of Paris. Various contingents of the fashion industry ventured into the French countryside for Dior’s 2019 Cruise show, set to take place in the Stables of Domaine de Chantilly, which, on this particular night, were being drenched with rain. After roughly two hours of driving, guests left their cars and were escorted under umbrellas into the predominantly roofless…

Keep on reading: Dior Horses Around for Cruise 2019
Source: V Magazine

Dior Horses Around for Cruise 2019

A Brief History of Artificial Light

A Brief History of Artificial Light

In the late 1950s and early 1960s, chemists Robert Bunsen and Henry Roscoe and showed that burning magnesium produces artificial light that’s similar to daylight. A man named Edward Sonstadt then brought the technology into the world of photography, and thus the idea for the photographic flash was born.

The Atlantic made this 2-minute video that provides “A Visual History of Light.” It steps through many of the most important artificial light sources that humans have used, starting from harnessing wood fires and to recent breakthroughs in harnessing hydrogen fusion.

(via The Atlantic via Shutterbug)


Source: PetaPixel

A Brief History of Artificial Light

Dad Accidentally Shoots Selfie Instead of Daughter’s Graduation Walk

Dad Accidentally Shoots Selfie Instead of Daughter’s Graduation Walk

If you’re shooting a once-in-a-lifetime moment with your phone, you should probably double-check that you’re pointing the right camera in the right direction. One proud dad learned that lesson the hard way: he thought he was shooting his daughter walking across the stage at her graduation, but what he actually got was a lifetime memory of his happy face up close.

His short 36-second video above has since made its way onto the Web and is providing chuckles and a helpful warning to parents everywhere.

“Woooooo!” the dad says as his daughter’s name is called. A moment later, he’s struck by the realization of what he had done (warning: there’s a slight bit of strong language).


Source: PetaPixel

Dad Accidentally Shoots Selfie Instead of Daughter’s Graduation Walk

Ep. 281: Sony Wants the Top Spot by 2021 – and more

Ep. 281: Sony Wants the Top Spot by 2021 – and more



Episode 281 of the PetaPixel Photography Podcast.
Download MP3 –  Subscribe via iTunesGoogle Playemail or RSS!

Featured: Fujifilm X photographer, Karen Hutton

In This Episode

If you subscribe to the PetaPixel Photography Podcast in iTunes, please take a moment to rate and review us and help us move up in the rankings so others interested in photography may find us.

Show Opener:
Fujifilm X photographer Karen Hutton, opens the show. Thanks Karen!

Sponsors:
– Get 20% off the new Sekonic Flashmate L-308X-U or anything at Sekonic.com with code PetaPixel20
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– More at LensShark.com/deals.

Stories:
Sony aims for being #1 by 2021. (#)

Fujifilm introduces the X-T100. (#)

Sony’s a9 wins Camera of the Year. (#)

When magazines bought photos they didn’t intend to use. (#)

Shutterbug magazines kills their print edition. (#)

Canon starts selling its sensors to others. (#)

My other podcast with Brian Matiash, the No Name Photo Show.

Connect With Us

Thank you for listening to the PetaPixel Photography Podcast! Connect with me, Sharky James on TwitterInstagram and Facebook (all @LensShark) as we build this community.

We’d love to answer your question on the show. Leave us an audio question through our voicemail widget, comment below or via social media. But audio questions are awesome!

You can also cut a show opener for us to play on the show! As an example: “Hi, this is Matt Smith with Double Heart Photography in Chicago, Illinois, and you’re listening to the PetaPixel Photography Podcast with Sharky James!”


Source: PetaPixel

Ep. 281: Sony Wants the Top Spot by 2021 – and more

The Story of How Photoshop Was First ‘Barneyscan XP’

The Story of How Photoshop Was First ‘Barneyscan XP’

Did you know that before it became the most dominant photo editing program on Earth, Photoshop was first sold as “Barneyscan XP”?

After creating their original program, brothers John and Thomas Knoll began looking for investors and customers. The first company to bite wasn’t Adobe, but rather a Berkeley, California-based company called Barneyscan, which created and sold the first high-quality 24-bit desktop color scanner.

Barneyscan was having trouble attracting buyers because photographers couldn’t do much with the photos digitized with the scanner.

“Though the scanner arrived on the market in late 1988 […] there was little interest in our product,” wrote Barneyscan co-founder Steve Schaffran in 2010 at TDI. “Since there was no good software to do anything with the pictures, we created problems for people. Even displaying them in full resolution was impossible for most.

“Why pay $10,000 to scan 35mm slides if the only thing you could do is look at one quarter of a 1.5 megapixel image on your 0.3 megapixel Mac II color display?”

So when they were introduced to Photoshop, Barneyscan saw that it was the missing piece of their puzzle. Here’s Schaffran’s account of receiving his first demo:

John showed me version 0.35 as I recall, and it was already a knock-out. It could resize (so now people could see our pictures), and it could sharpen, soften, lighten, darken, adjust curves, and make dozens of other amazing transformations I had never seen nor could comprehend.

One of the transformations, however, made my hair stand on end: it could flip a color picture from the network, green, blue color space of the computer display to the cyan, magenta, yellow, black color space necessary for exposing printing plates for printing color. That meant that a $15,000 bundle of our scanner plus Photoshop 0.35 plus to Mac II was in principle to competitor for the $1,000,000 to $3,000,000 color scanning and retouching solutions then used in the printing industry. If we could only strike a deal, we were sure to sell some scanners.

Thomas Knoll was asking for $300,000 plus 18% of income for rights to Photoshop, but Barneyscan made them a different offer: bundle the software with the Barneyscan scanner, and the Knolls would receive a $250 royalty with each sale. The software was also modified so that the program would only function if a Barneyscan scanner was attached to the computer.

“For practical purposes, the Barneyscan was a 10 thousand dollar lock,” Schaffran says.

In 1989, Photoshop Version 0.65 was branded “Barneyscan XP” and bundled with Barneyscan’s film scanner. Peter J. Sucy shares this brochure that advertised Barneyscan and its new software:

Barneyscan XP was a success and received more attention than the scanner it was included for, writes Stories of Apple.

But Barneyscan’s decision to license a rebranded version of Photoshop rather than acquire the software outright — thanks in large part to a single investor that was adamantly against the deal — opened the door to Adobe striking a deal with the Knoll brothers. Less than a year after “Barneyscan XP” launched, Adobe art director Russell Brown became interested in Photoshop, prompting Adobe to license and distribute the Knoll brothers’ software itself.

And that’s how Adobe Photoshop was born.

(via Quora via Boing Boing)


Source: PetaPixel

The Story of How Photoshop Was First ‘Barneyscan XP’

Cloud Cam Timelapse Captures Glow of Hawaii Volcano

Cloud Cam Timelapse Captures Glow of Hawaii Volcano

The Gemini Observatory on Hawaii’s Mauna Kea dormant volcano has a cloud camera that’s used to monitor sky conditions. But during the ongoing eruption of the Kīlauea volcano, the camera has also been capturing the eruptions dramatic and eerie glow through clouds. Above is a 48-second time-lapse of the glow in the night between May 21st and 22nd.

“During the sequence, multiple fissures expelled lava in the area in and around Leilani Estates in the Puna district of the Big Island of Hawai‘i,” the Gemini Observatory writes. “The lava also flowed into the ocean during the period of the video.”

One of the photos that went into making the timelapse.

The camera is a DSLR that has had its infrared filter removed, paired with a wide-angle lens. The removal of the filter “causes the volcanic glow to take on a white/blue hue rather than the familiar red color of the lava,” Gemini says.

The observatory also took 100 photos used for the timelapse spanning about 1 hour of time and stacked them to create this photo showing star trails and the bright glow of the volcano below:

“A bright meteor and the greenish glow of the town of Hilo can be seen left of center,” Gemini says.


Image credits: Timelapse video and photo by Gemini Observatory/AURA/NSF. Star trail photo by Joy Pollard/Gemini Observatory/AURA/NSF


Source: PetaPixel

Cloud Cam Timelapse Captures Glow of Hawaii Volcano

Shygirl Talks New EP and Her Rihanna Connection

Shygirl Talks New EP and Her Rihanna Connection
Some artists’ onstage personas are heightened, uninhibited versions of themselves. But Shygirl, the Rihanna-approved vocalist from south London, puts her introversion front and center, espousing a neo-emo attitude on her new EP Cruel Practice, out today on Nuxxe Records. And while her laconic delivery and hammering beats are sure to appeal to today’s club kids, Shygirl, whose real name is Blane Muise, didn’t necessarily have the audience in mind while creating the record. “I was mostly…

Keep on reading: Shygirl Talks New EP and Her Rihanna Connection
Source: V Magazine

Shygirl Talks New EP and Her Rihanna Connection

Model Talk: Meghan Roche

Model Talk: Meghan Roche
Where were you born and where are you based now?
I was born in suburbs of Pennsylvania, and I am currently living the New York life!
 When did you start modeling?
I signed with Women Management when I was only 15 however, I didn’t “start” modeling until this past year. We were waiting for me to transition from a regular school environment to an online school so that I could travel and work full-time. It would have been a tease to start modeling while I was still trying to attend real s…

Keep on reading: Model Talk: Meghan Roche
Source: V Magazine

Model Talk: Meghan Roche