What to Know Before Covering a Hurricane

What to Know Before Covering a Hurricane

Photojournalists in south Texas are prepping to cover Hurricane Harvey―a Category 2 storm that meteorologists are predicting will bring as much as 35 inches of rain into the region with winds of 100 mph, according to the National Weather Service.

For those covering the storm, we’re sharing the NPPA Safety & Security Task Force’s Hurricane Coverage guidelines, which are outlined below and can be found in full here.

1. Turn around, don’t drown.

Half of all flood-related drownings occur when a vehicle is driven into hazardous flood water, the NPPA guidelines note. It is never safe to drive into flood waters.

2. Pack your go-bag with essential items, things you’ll need besides your camera gear.

Think clothes for bad weather, appropriate footwear, medication and toiletries, first aid kit, vehicle emergency supplies including at least one five-gallon gas jug. Consider chest waders, a life jacket and a length of rope if you plan to walk in flooded waters.

3. Before you go, do your research.

Check and see if there’s a public notification alert option for the area where you plan to go. Look for the “Emergency Management” website of the area you will be covering. Bookmark these sites on your phone and laptop and learn how to quickly search for updated information to have all the necessary information to make safe decisions. Check the National Hurricane Center.

4. Bring cash.

Don’t rely on credit cards or ATMs. The NPPA suggests that $600 per person should be okay.

5. Communicate and navigate.

Have a plan for communicating with—and checking in with— your loved ones and editors. Don’t rely on cellphone service. By now, most journalists heading towards the storm should have arranged to use satellite phones, two-way radios, multiple cellphone providers, satellite tracker messaging devices, etc.

Source: NPPA.org

 

The post What to Know Before Covering a Hurricane appeared first on PDNPulse.


Source: PDN Pulse

What to Know Before Covering a Hurricane

Lightning Strikes Feet Away from Man While His Camera is Rolling

Lightning Strikes Feet Away from Man While His Camera is Rolling

A man in Norway has captured what it’s like to have a lightning bolt strike just feet away. Watch the 1.5-minute video above to see the terrifying experience from his perspective (warning: turn your speakers down because it’s extremely loud).

TV 2 reports that on Monday, 38-year-old Daniel Modøl was standing on his terrace in Gjerstad, Aust-Agder, and shooting lightning flashing in the horizon. Without warning, there was a deafening crack as a lightning bolt struck less than 20 feet away on the other side of the terrace.

While the bolt itself wasn’t caught on camera, we do see rocks and dirt flying through the air and a smoldering spot piece of ground.

Modøl wisely decided that he wouldn’t stay outside to see if he could catch a second close strike on camera. He immediately headed for cover indoors, where he found his ceiling fan off and burn marks around an electrical outlet where his modem was.


Source: PetaPixel

Lightning Strikes Feet Away from Man While His Camera is Rolling

Karl Lagerfeld Is Releasing A Collaboration With Vans

Karl Lagerfeld Is Releasing A Collaboration With Vans
Vans will officially collaborate with legendary designer Karl Lagerfeld to give the classic checkerboard pattern a chic upgrade. According to WWD, Vans’ trademark pattern will now feature camouflage, “using a cameo motif depicting Lagerfeld’s iconic profile, with boucle fabric and a quilted letter K among other leitmotifs.”
The California-based favorite among skaters and street style aficionados will work with Lagerfeld on the hallmark “Old Skool” sneakers as well as other interpr…

Keep on reading: Karl Lagerfeld Is Releasing A Collaboration With Vans
Source: V Magazine

Karl Lagerfeld Is Releasing A Collaboration With Vans

Nikon D850 Has Same Image Quality at Double the ISO as the D810: Report

Nikon D850 Has Same Image Quality at Double the ISO as the D810: Report

The Nikon D850 has generated a considerable amount of excitement among photographers today after its announcement, and here’s a new fact that will add even more fuel to the frenzy: Nikon says the D850 should have the same image quality at double the ISO as the D810.

That’s what Imaging Resource learned after meeting with top Nikon personnel at the company’s headquarters in Japan.

“Nikon told us that the D850 should produce the same image quality (both JPEG and RAW) at twice the ISOs as the D810, a full-stop improvement,” Imaging Resource writes. “That is, the D850 at its top ‘native’ ISO of 25,600 should deliver the same image quality as the D810 did at ISO 12,800. If true, that’s a pretty significant improvement.”

“Nikon says dynamic range will be as good or better than that of the D810, despite the higher pixel count.”

Only tests will be able to determine if these claims are true, but if they are, this is a huge boon for photographers who often work in low-light environments.

Nikon also revealed to Imaging Resource that the new backside-illuminated (BSI) sensor design in the D850 — the first in a Nikon DSLR — isn’t primarily for low-light performance but rather for speedier shooting speed by providing “more flexibility in the chip’s wiring.”

And if you’ve been wondering about the origins of this new sensor, you’ll be interested to know that Nikon designed it themselves rather than use an off-the-shelf sensor from a sensor manufacturer (e.g. Sony).

“While Nikon contracts with a silicon foundry to actually manufacture the chips, Nikon confirmed that the D850’s sensor is entirely their own design,” Imaging Resource reports.


Source: PetaPixel

Nikon D850 Has Same Image Quality at Double the ISO as the D810: Report

Photo Studio Polyboards and Thrifty Alternatives

Photo Studio Polyboards and Thrifty Alternatives

Nearly every professional studio I’ve ever used has these “polyboards” and you‘ve probably even seen them yourself but may not have known what they’re used for. Polyboards are polystyrene boards that usually measure 4 feet wide by 8 feet high and are normally 2 inches thick. One of the other defining characteristics is that they are often white on one side and black on the other.

This dual color is very important as this gives them two key uses. The white side is used for bouncing light back into the shadows of an image, for example, a light would be placed on one side of the model and a white polyboard on the other side of them. The light would illuminate one side and the polyboard would fill in the shadows from the other side providing a very beautifying light.

The black side is used for the opposite reason, to reduce the bounce of light. In certain situations in a big white studio, your lighting can bounce around and result in the lighting on the model looking quite flat and uninteresting. By placing black polybords either side of your subject can help sculpt shape and form by adding shadows where there was none before.

Using polyboards, whether that be in a studio or on location, can be a great way to control your lighting. Here I’m using the black sides of the polyboards to create shadow on the side of the models face when using a softer light source.

For your reference, ‘polyboards’ can be purchased under the name of polystyrene sheets from DIY and hardware stores under the insulation section. An 8-by-4-foot board is 2400mm by 1200mm. You also want to watch out for the thickness. We’ll be using them for a purpose that they aren’t intended for so you need to purchase a thickness that is substantial enough to hold its own weight when upright. I recommend a 2-inch-thick sheet and that translates to 50mm.

Making it Stand Up

Polyboards are primarily used in the construction industry for insulation, as a result, they’re relatively cheap to buy. When you buy them, they normally arrive bright white on both sides so the first step is to paint one side black. But the biggest issue with them is not painting them but getting them to stand up. Normally this is quite costly as purpose built metal stands need to be purchased. But here’s a far cheaper hack that works perfectly: a simple bike stand.

In the above image, you’ll see a single bike stand that holds your polyboards upright perfectly and very cheaply. Just make sure it’s at least 2 inches wide and you’re all set.

Using it On Location

But what if you want the benefits of a polyboard but you’re on the move and working on location? Obviously bringing an 8-foot by 4-foot sheet of polystyrene is hardly very practical so here’s a mobile alternative. Simply use a large white reflector and attach it to a light stand via a couple of multi-purpose clamps and brackets.

No matter how big or small the job, I always carry around these handy clamps and they come in especially handy here. Simply take your light stand, put an umbrella bracket at right angles on top and then attach a spring loaded clamp onto that. This will now hold your reflector firmly in place.

Desperate Times, Desperate Measures

When things get really desperate and you don’t even have a large reflector with you, then a simple white sheet can be utilized to just as good effect. Any white sheet will do and by simply screwing a small crab-clamp atop your light stand and then getting that in turn to hold a crossbar (any pole or even broom-handle will do), you can then simply clip your sheet to that and you’re ready to shoot.

The white sheet can be anything from a large sheet of white cotton fabric to a simple bed sheet.

And here’s a pro tip: remember that these mobile ‘polyboard’ alternatives can be implemented with the black variations. Most reflectors now come with a black flip-side and that can be clipped in place instead of the white side. Also, if you’re after a black alternative to the white sheet, I recommend black cotton velvet.

This fabric soaks up more light than anything else and I will often use this fabric in a studio environment over the black polyboards as it’s so good at reducing bounced light.

You can see me using the black velvet sheets on stands here in a studio to heavily control the bounce of light:

In large white spaces like studios, the light will keep bouncing around the walls, floor, and ceiling which can leave your lighting looking flat. You should be able to see here on the final image that there is very soft beautiful light on the models face but there are still strong shadows on the sides of her face to give depth and shape.


About the author: Jake Hicks is an editorial and fashion photographer based in Reading, UK. He specializes in keeping the skill in the camera and not just on the screen. Hicks has also just announced his first ever U.S. workshops in September 2017. If you’d like to learn more about his incredibly popular gelled lighting and post-pro techniques, visit this link for more info. You can find more of his work and writing on his website, Facebook, 500px, Instagram, Twitter, and Flickr. This article was also published here.


Source: PetaPixel

Photo Studio Polyboards and Thrifty Alternatives

FotoEvidence Teams Up With World Press Photo for New Photography Award

FotoEvidence Teams Up With World Press Photo for New Photography Award

FotoEvidence and the World Press Photo Foundation have announced a new documentary photography award for 2018 called the FotoEvidence Book Award with World Press Photo. The winner’s work will be published in a book and promoted by FotoEvidence, and two other selected finalists will be exhibited during the World Press Photo Exhibition in 2018 in Amsterdam.

The award is open to professional and amateur documentary photographers covering human rights violations, injustices or assaults on human dignity. Entries are currently being accepted (note: there is a $50 fee to apply) and the deadline to submit your work is December 15. Entry rules and guidelines can be found here.

Judges for the new award include Svetlana Bachevanova, publisher of PhotoEvidence; Lars Boering, managing director of the World Press Photo Foundation; Peter van Agtmael, photographer and founder of Red Hook Editions; Gary Knight, VII Photo Agency co-founder; Jen Tse, photo editor at Newsweek; and Daniella Zalcman, award-winning documentary photographer.

Notes Bachevanova: “After seven years and sixteen FotoEvidence books, we expect the FotoEvidence Book Award with World Press Photo to expand our reach to a worldwide audience, strengthen our mission promoting social justice, and increase our support for photographers who demonstrate courage and commitment in the pursuit of human rights.”

Previous FotoEvidence Book Award winners include Zalcman (2016), Marcus Bleasdale (2015) and Majid Saeedi (2014). The 2017 award was given to Poulomi Basu for her project “Blood Speaks: A Ritual of Exile,” but FotoEvidence rescinded Basu’s award because of questions about her ethical conduct while creating the work, and misleading caption information.

Related Articles:

Images from Danielle Zalcman’s FotoEvidence Book, Signs of Your Identity

Do The Right Thing: Photojournalists on Ethics and Their Responsibilities

Photographers Explain Their Approaches to Covering Sensitive Subjects

The post FotoEvidence Teams Up With World Press Photo for New Photography Award appeared first on PDNPulse.


Source: PDN Pulse

FotoEvidence Teams Up With World Press Photo for New Photography Award

This Guy Shot the Solar Eclipse with a Game Boy Camera

This Guy Shot the Solar Eclipse with a Game Boy Camera

During the Great American Eclipse, while most photographers worried about camera settings and solar filters, Redditor zhx decided to bust out a Game Boy Camera, which was introduced in 1998 and features a 128×128 pixel CMOS sensor.

Here’s the photo, captured from Portland, Oregon:

The solar eclipse actually takes up a very small portion of the frame, and the dark circle is a halo effect from the corona around the moon.

Here’s a photo of the camera kit zhx used:

The camera is so old that working with the resulting files isn’t exactly easy and straightforward. Here’s zhx’s explanation for how he got the photo off his Game Boy Camera:

I shot it on my backlit DMG [Game Boy], then I use the Interact Mega Memory card on my Pocket (the camera doesn’t fit in the DMG with the Mega Memory) and back the SAV file up to the Mega Memory. Then I plug my USB 64M cart into the MM and restore the file to that, which I can then plug into my computer and retrieve (I use EMS-Qart for that part). Then I can open the SAV file in either GBCamera Dump or this site which provides a pretty drag-and-drop front end for this task. I then typically enlarge the BMPs in Photoshop and export to PNG.

When it was released in 1998, the Game Boy Camera was actually the world’s smallest digital camera. Earlier this year, astrophotographer Alexander Pietrow became the first person to ever photograph the Moon and Jupiter using the device.


Image credits: Photographs by zhx and used with permission


Source: PetaPixel

This Guy Shot the Solar Eclipse with a Game Boy Camera

Shutterstock’s Randomized Watermark Protects Photos from Google’s AI

Shutterstock’s Randomized Watermark Protects Photos from Google’s AI

Google recently published a paper showing how easy it is for a computer to detect an identical watermark from a large collection of photos and then cleanly remove that watermark from each photo. Shutterstock has responded to Google’s AI by developing a new randomized watermark that counters it.

Google’s research found that many common stock watermarks can be removed since they appear identically across a huge number of online photos.

Shutterstock was actually notified about the search before the paper was published, and its engineers began working on a way to fix the flaws that Google researchers uncovered. Google’s conclusion was that to prevent computers from being able to easily isolate a watermark, you need to introduce random variations to your watermark. That’s exactly what Shutterstock decided to do.

“The challenge was protecting images without degrading the image quality,” Shutterstock CTO Martin Brodbeck says. “Changing the opacity and location of a watermark does not make it more secure, however changing the geometry does.”

Engineers developed a new watermark randomizer that results in no two Shutterstock watermarks ever being exactly the same now.

“The shapes vary per image and include contributor names,” Brodbeck says. “By creating a completely different watermark for each image, it makes it hard to truly identify the shape.”

Here’s what the standard Shutterstock watermark looked like prior to this new technology being rolled out:

And here’s what the new watermark looks like:

This new random watermark has been rolled out to all of Shutterstock’s 150 million+ photos and images. Google engineers already tested the new watermarks and found that they successfully foil Google’s watermark removal AI system.


Source: PetaPixel

Shutterstock’s Randomized Watermark Protects Photos from Google’s AI

This Eclipse Photo Shows the Power of Shooting RAW

This Eclipse Photo Shows the Power of Shooting RAW

Here’s an eye-opening example that shows the power of shooting RAW. Photographer Dan Plucinski captured a beautiful photo of the solar eclipse yesterday, and this is the before-and-after comparison showing the straight-out-of-camera image (on left) compared to the edited one (on right).

Plucinski got to the location in Oregon at 6am and set up for his shot. During totality, Plucinski shot exposure bracketed photos using his Nikon D750. This photo was captured without a filter at f/11, 1/8s, and ISO 100:

But this photo didn’t accurately capture what the human eye could see. To correct that, Plucinski did some minimal editing on the shot to bring out details in the shadows. Since he was working with a RAW file, there was quite a bit of detail to be recovered. Here’s what his photo looked like after the exposure tweak:

“The ‘fog’ is actually from the French and Whitewater wild fires,” Plucinski tells PetaPixel. “I bracketed my shots with the intention of using HDR, but after seeing how many recomposed images went viral, I just loved the authenticity of a single exposure like this.”

“It’s unbelievable, but that’s how it actually looked in person.”

Having this degree of flexibility for exposure adjustments is a huge benefit of shooting RAW over JPEG. At the same time, the Nikon D750 is a camera known for having a fantastic dynamic range.

And just in case you’re wondering, here’s what the details in the shadowy landscape look like if you try to recover them from the JPEG photo:

(via DPReview)


Source: PetaPixel

This Eclipse Photo Shows the Power of Shooting RAW

Get Chaka Khan’s Vivid Violet Lipstick Look From V109

Get Chaka Khan’s Vivid Violet Lipstick Look From V109
In celebration of our V109 exclusive with the legendary Chaka Khan, we’re deconstructing her bold and vibrant look. The Queen of Funk graced our pages with a teal Fendi fur, metallic bronze eyeshadow and plum lipstick to contrast. Learn how to cop her look for yourself:
Eyes:
For a single color eye that still shines like Khan’s, you’ll want to use a cream shadow in a gold-toned glittery peach, like Chanel’s Ombre Premiére Longwear Cream Eyeshadow in shade 802 “Undertone.”  Apply it …

Keep on reading: Get Chaka Khan’s Vivid Violet Lipstick Look From V109
Source: V Magazine

Get Chaka Khan’s Vivid Violet Lipstick Look From V109