How to Build and Use DIY Strip Light Modifiers for Speedlights

How to Build and Use DIY Strip Light Modifiers for Speedlights

Do you enjoy making your own lighting gear instead of spending hefty fees for commercial products? Here’s a 10-minute tutorial by photography instructor Joe Edelman on how to build and use your own strip light modifier for under $25.

Edelman says that a lot of current modifiers are expensive and that spending anything from $125 or more on a modifier that only gets occasionally used is “too much for [him] to justify,” so he decided to create his own. He also thinks shop-bought strip lights are not entirely practical. For example, having to insert a strobe light entirely into the strip modifier means that you can’t access the controls.

With this DIY model, you are able to mount it either vertically or horizontally while still retaining access to the controls.

To create it yourself, you’ll need the following:

  • 3″ x 60″ Kraft mailing tube with end caps ($4.81)
  • 1″ x 12″ Hook and loop cable tie down straps ($1.09 each)
  • 24″ x 48″ sheet of white translucent plastic film ($10.36)
  • Tripod screw holder adapter ($1.99)
  • Flash speedlight umbrella holder ($4.33)
  • 1″ flat washer
  • 1/4 20 x 1″ screw
  • Jigsaw / table saw / sharp utility knife

The video also includes some great tips for how to actually use the strip light in the studio.

For example, with the strip positioned on the right (and with the majority of the strip at a height to ensure light falls from above) a very nice portrait can be taken with just a single light source.

Here are some other examples of different setups, as well as the resulting images:

Reflector added to left of camera.

Clam shell setup.

Check out the full video above for a more detailed walkthrough on building and using this type of strip light. You can also find more of Edelman’s videos through his YouTube channel.


Source: PetaPixel

How to Build and Use DIY Strip Light Modifiers for Speedlights

Valentino Is Staging Sport-Themed Pop-Shops Around The Globe

Valentino Is Staging Sport-Themed Pop-Shops Around The Globe
Valentino is taking fashion’s love for athleisure to the next level as the brand is opening sport-themed pop-up shops in New York, Milan, Hong Kong and Tokyo to sell the fashion house’s athletic-inspired Resort 2018 collection—which was presented by Pierpaolo Piccioli in May.
Each interior of the space is specifically designed to resemble the chicest gym you’ve ever laid eyes on and training spaces. Additionally, the pop-ups will be selling the Resort collection along with, sports gea…

Keep on reading: Valentino Is Staging Sport-Themed Pop-Shops Around The Globe
Source: V Magazine

Valentino Is Staging Sport-Themed Pop-Shops Around The Globe

Shooting Portraits with a Giant Moon Using a 1120mm Lens

Shooting Portraits with a Giant Moon Using a 1120mm Lens

Photographer Eric Pare recently went out into the desert and shot a set of photos showing a model sitting next to the moon. And the size of the moon in the photos wasn’t faked. Pare managed to capture a gigantic moon by using a 1120mm lens and having his model sit very far away.

Pare was shooting with a Canon 5D Mark IV DSLR using a Canon 400mm f/5.6 mounted to a 2x extender (Mark II), which in turn was mounted to a 1.4x extender. The teleconverter stacking gave the resulting setup a focal length of 1120mm.

To achieve the lens compression he needed to make the moon (a distant object) look bigger than usual, Pare placed himself at a great distance from his model:

“It turned out to be much easier than expected,” Pare says. “During the shooting, I realized that I was able to step down the aperture to f/64 by using the extenders. This gave me a very dirty low-quality image, but the fact that the moon and Kim were quite in focus was very mind-boggling.”

Here’s a photo Pare captured at 1120mm, f/64, 1/125s, and ISO 1600:

At this aperture, all the dust specks on the sensor show up in the image as ugly dark splotches. By cleaning up the photo in Photoshop, however, Pare was left with a usable image that was created using a single exposure.

Pare also used focus stacking at larger apertures to get the moon and his model both in focus. Here’s a focus stacked image that used separate photos captured at 1120mm, f/11, 1/200s, and ISO 100:

Here’s a short 3.5-minute behind-the-scenes look at how this shoot was done:

You can find more of Pare’s work on his website and Instagram. The model and dancer, Kim Henry, has more work on Instagram as well.


Source: PetaPixel

Shooting Portraits with a Giant Moon Using a 1120mm Lens

Ricoh Announces 11-18mm f/2.8 and 50mm f/1.4 Pentax Star-series Lenses

Ricoh Announces 11-18mm f/2.8 and 50mm f/1.4 Pentax Star-series Lenses

Ricoh has unveiled two new lenses in its premium Star-series lineup: the Ricoh HD Pentax-DA 11-18mm f/2.8 and the HD Pentax-D FA 50mm f/1.4 SDM AW. Both lenses are optimized for “super high-resolution photography and high megapixel digital SLR cameras.”

Available in Pentax-K mounts, the lenses are the first of a new generation for the Star-series.

“Premium-quality Star-series lenses deliver the highest performance among the PENTAX K-mount interchangeable lens series, and have been highly regarded by PENTAX K-Mount users since the days of film,” Ricoh says.

The Star-series has a clear focus on quality, with an additional aim of providing “exceptional toughness” and “outstanding operability” so that the lenses stand up to a number of situations that could be thrown at them. This means the lenses boast a dustproof and weather-resistant build.

The 11-18mm f/2.8 lens will cover the image circle of an APS-C format crop sensor and will be available in summer 2018.

The 50mm f/1.4 lens is built for full-frame sensors and has a minimum shooting distance of 0.4 meters (15.7 inches). There’s also a newly developed ring-shaped SDM (Supersonic Direct-drive Motor) which enables faster and quieter autofocus. It’s scheduled for launch in the spring of 2018.

Further details, including final names and pricing, will be made available by Ricoh at some point in 2018.


Source: PetaPixel

Ricoh Announces 11-18mm f/2.8 and 50mm f/1.4 Pentax Star-series Lenses

A Colorized Photo of Native Americans Looking at Camera Film in 1913

A Colorized Photo of Native Americans Looking at Camera Film in 1913

Here’s a beautiful photo from over 100 years ago that shows two Native Americans looking at a strip of photographic film against the sky. It’s a black-and-white photo that was colorized by colorization artist Jecinci.

The photo was captured in 1913 by photographer Joseph Kossuth Dixon during an expedition with department store tycoon Rodman Wanamaker, who sponsored three photographic expeditions between 1908 and 1913 to document the Native American way of life.

Here’s the original image as it’s found in the Library of Congress digital collection:

The caption is: “Two Native Americans, wearing feather headdresses, looking at photographic film; they stand next to a stream with photographic equipment at their feet and tipis in the background.”

You can find more of Jecinci’s work on their Facebook, Flickr, Instagram, and Twitter.


Source: PetaPixel

A Colorized Photo of Native Americans Looking at Camera Film in 1913

Thursday Tip: How to Get Celebrity Publicists to Say Yes

Thursday Tip: How to Get Celebrity Publicists to Say Yes

Celebrity publicists are often quick to reject good portrait ideas from photographers and photo editors. They’re afraid photographers will make their clients look bad. But Greg Garry, photo editor for OUT magazine, has strategies for getting around their caution.

“One of my secret weapons is I usually present my favorite idea second,” he says. “You [present] the most outlandish one first so they can say no immediately, and then you say, ‘OK, well how about this,’ and you’ll have the actual idea you want to do.”

Another solution is to get the celebrity on board with the shoot, and essentially bypass the publicist. “Most of the time the celebrity is into whatever you want to do. They want to make an interesting, creative picture too.”

See “Photo Editors’ Tips on How to Photograph Celebrities” (subscription required)

Related:
How Celebrity Portrait Photographers Beat the Clock
PDN Video: Photographer Brian Smith on How to Get a Striking Video Portrait
PDN Video: Bil Zelman on Shooting Portraits of Difficult Celebrity subjects
Video Pick: Chris Buck and Jimmy Fallon Get Surprise on Shoot for Variety

The post Thursday Tip: How to Get Celebrity Publicists to Say Yes appeared first on PDNPulse.


Source: PDN Pulse

Thursday Tip: How to Get Celebrity Publicists to Say Yes

Getty Images Announces Instagram Grant Winners

Getty Images Announces Instagram Grant Winners

Getty Images and Instagram have awarded $10,000 grants to three emerging photographers who use the social media platform to share stories of underrepresented communities:

Nina Robinson (@arkansasfamilyalbum) photographers her family and their community in rural Arkansas.

Saumya Khandelwal’s (@khandelwal_saumya) images follow the daily lives of young girls in Uttar Pradesh, India who are forced into early marriages.

Isadora Kosofsky (@isadorakosofsky) has explored social issues in America, including the impact of substance abuse, poverty, mental health and mass incarceration on American families.

The grants are provided to help photographers pay for expenses for the production of new work. The judges for the grant were photojournalist Adriana Zehbrauskas (a previous winner of the grant); artist Eleanor MacNair; Nicolas Jimenez, director of photography at Le Monde; filmmaker and photographer Jeff Frost; and Azu Nwagbogu, director of the Lagos Photo Festival. Entrants were nominated by photo editors and art directors throughout the photo industry.

Work by the winners will be exhibited at the Getty Images gallery in London, and promoted through Getty Images’ website and social media channels,

Related Articles

Nina Robinson’s Arkansas Family Album

Picture Story: Teen Brothers in Jail, at Home, and in the System

Getty Images Announces Instagram Grant Winners (2016)

 

The post Getty Images Announces Instagram Grant Winners appeared first on PDNPulse.


Source: PDN Pulse

Getty Images Announces Instagram Grant Winners

Getty Announces $40,000 Bursary for Emerging Photographers

Getty Announces ,000 Bursary for Emerging Photographers

Getty Images has announced the creation of the Getty Images Creative Bursary for photographers who are under 30 years of age or have been working for three years or less. Getty plans to give $10,000 per quarter to help emerging photographers fund “dream projects,” the agency said in an announcement last week. Each quarter, a panel of judges will choose three photographers, splitting the $10,000 among them: $5,000 for first place; $3,500 for second place; and $2,000 for third.

“This new Bursary is a dream project of ours,” said Getty Images Senior Vice President of Creative Content Andy Saunders. “We are committed to supporting and fostering photographic talent, and are looking forward to working with a diverse group of young and emerging photographers, helping to enable their creative vision.”

Photographers who are thinking about applying should be sure to read the fine print. The terms of the bursary stipulate, among other things, that photographers who accept the funding “agree to grant Getty Images a worldwide, royalty free, perpetual license to render the project available for license on its platforms.”

The application period is open now through the end of December for the first bursary. Applicants are being asked to submit a project proposal and visual brief, and are encouraged to submit ideas in any genre of photography, from conceptual fine-art to traditional stock.

Judges for the first round of funding will include Saunders, Flak Photo’s Andy Adams, fashion editor and stylist Jeanie Annan-Lewin, Diversity Photo co-founder Andrea Wise, and fellow Diversity Photo co-founder and photo editor of ESPN’s The Undefeated, Brent Lewis.

The Getty Images Creative Bursary is part of the wider Getty Images Grants initiative that includes the Editorial Grant, Chris Hondros Fund Award, Emerging Talent Award and Instagram Grant.

The post Getty Announces $40,000 Bursary for Emerging Photographers appeared first on PDNPulse.


Source: PDN Pulse

Getty Announces ,000 Bursary for Emerging Photographers

Olympus Unveils 17mm and 45mm f/1.2 Lenses for Micro Four Thirds

Olympus Unveils 17mm and 45mm f/1.2 Lenses for Micro Four Thirds

Olympus has just announced two new lenses to its M.ZUIKO F1.2 PRO lens roster: a 17mm and a 45mm. They join the existing M.ZUIKO 25mm f/1.2 PRO in the high-end, large-aperture lineup.

One of the main qualities Olympus says it focused on was bokeh aesthetics.

“By focusing not only on the bokeh’s size but also its quality, each lens produces a feathered bokeh effect that better emphasizes the main subject and allows it to stand out within the image,” Olympus says. “The shallower depth of field produced at F1.2 is especially ideal for portrait photographers.”

Shooting at f/1.2 produces a “feathered bokeh” effect that transitions smoothly from sharp to defocused areas of the photo. Stopping down the aperture results in a more traditional bokeh quality.

The 17mm f/1.2 is a new ED-DSA lens, containing both ED (Extra-low Dispersion) and DSA (Dual Super Aspherical) qualities. These lens elements help counter wide-angle optical issues such as chromatic aberration, distortion, and color bleeding on the edges of the frame.

The M.ZUIKO Digital ED 17mm f/1.2

Both the 17mm f/1.2 and the 45mm f/1.2 are lightweight lenses that feature a durable build — they’re dustproof, splashproof, and freezeproof (down to 14°F/-10°C).

The M.ZUIKO Digital ED 45mm f/1.2 PRO

Other features of the lenses include silent and smooth autofocusing, Face Priority and Eye Priority AF, a shared filter thread size across the f/1.2 lens lineup, close minimum focusing distances (20cm/7.9in for the 17mm and 50cm/19.7in for the 45mm), an L-Fn button, and an MF Clutch mechanism for switching between auto and manual focusing by pulling the focusing ring.

Here are some sample photos captured with the M.ZUIKO Digital ED 17mm f/1.2:

And here are some sample photos shot with the M.ZUIKO Digital ED 45mm f/1.2 PRO:

Here are two videos introducing these lenses:

The M.ZUIKO Digital ED 45mm f/1.2 PRO will be available first in late November 2017, and the M.ZUIKO Digital ED 17mm f/1.2 will follow with a launch sometime in late January 2018. Both lenses will have the same price of $1,200.


Source: PetaPixel

Olympus Unveils 17mm and 45mm f/1.2 Lenses for Micro Four Thirds

Photos of Cats Doing Martial Arts

Photos of Cats Doing Martial Arts

Hisakata Hiroyuki is a Japanese photographer who has focused his career on a rather unusual subject matter: action photos of cats that make them look like they’re doing martial arts.

Each of the pictures freezes leaping cats in time and makes them look like they’re practicing fighting techniques and sparring with other cats.

You can find more of Hiroyuki’s work on Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook. Hiroyuki has also published two photo books of his work.

(via Hisakata Hiroyuki via Photoblog.hk)


Image credits: Photographs by Hisakata Hiroyuki and used with permission


Source: PetaPixel

Photos of Cats Doing Martial Arts