Yunghi Kim Announces Winners of Her $1,000 Yunghi Grants

Yunghi Kim Announces Winners of Her ,000 Yunghi Grants

Ten photojournalists have won $1,000 grants from photographer Yunghi Kim, the founder and sponsor of the Yunghi Grant competition. The winners include:

Amber Bracken, for her work about Canada’s indigenous people.

Andreea Campeanu, for her project about the sex trade in Romania.

Mikala Compton, for a project about a pagan community in Missouri.

Marko Drobnjakovic, for a project called “The Last Yugoslavs.”

Brendan Hoffman, for “Webster City,” about small town life in middle America.

Lauren Justice, for a project called “Voices of Violence.”

Leo Novel, for “Breaking the Glass Ceiling,” about feminist activists in France.

Michael Santiago, for his ongoing project about black farmers in the US.

Andrew Seng, for a project called “Interracial Intimacy.”

Ines Della Valle, for “Spiritual Path of Ancient Egypt,” about the foundations of western spirituality.

This year’s winners were selected by Yunghi Kim and Contact Press Images director Jeffrey Smith. Applications were up more than 30 percent this year to 83, including 33 applications from women, Kim says.

“It was a challenge to narrow it to ten,” she said in a statement announcing the winners. “I am immensely proud of all the entrants of this grant: all are committed photographers who are part of our photojournalism community, all attempting meaningful work as best as they can manage, often under difficult circumstances.”

The grants are intended to help photographers “start, further or finish a project,” or to help cover “everyday life expenses,” according to the competition rules. To apply, photographers must be members of the Photojournalists Cooperative, a Facebook group for professional photographers only.

Kim initiated the grant two years ago to emphasize to photographers the importance of copyright registration, and to give back to the photo community, she says. She funds the grants with money she collects for unauthorized use of her work.

“YES it makes a difference if you copyright register your work and everyone should make a practice of it in your workflow. Thing of it as digital teeth brushing,” she says on the Yunghi Grant website.

Related:
Ten Photojournalists Win $1K Grants from Yunghi Kim (2016)

Hirve, Agusti and Demczuk Win $2,500 Each in Inaugural Wome Photograph + ONA Grants

Danielle Villasana’s Advice on Applying for Grants and Awards

The post Yunghi Kim Announces Winners of Her $1,000 Yunghi Grants appeared first on PDNPulse.


Source: PDN Pulse

Yunghi Kim Announces Winners of Her ,000 Yunghi Grants

3D Printing Your Photo as a Lithophane

3D Printing Your Photo as a Lithophane

Want an interesting idea for turning your digital photo into something tangible that you can hold? Look into the lithophane, the centuries-old technique of carving an image into a piece of translucent material to create a 3D image. Photographer Daniel DeArco recently turned a photo into a lithophane with 3D printing, and he documented the experience in the 4-minute video above.

“Lithophanes are old craft from the early 1800s that utilized the different thicknesses in a porcelain carving/casting to display a highly detailed image when backlit,” DeArco tells PetaPixel.

Lithophanes are carved so that brighter areas in the scene are thinner in the material and darker areas are thicker. The result may look strange in your hand, but when you hold it up and backlight it with a light source, a beautiful 3D image is revealed.

If you don’t have a 3D printer readily available, don’t worry: DeArco used a website called Image to Lithophane that can help generate a 3D printing model for creating lithophanes from photos.

The website turns your uploaded photo into an STL file. Specify whether you have a positive or negative image, and then download the file to your computer.

You then load the STL file into a slicer program that slices your 3D model into hundreds of layers to help guide the 3D printing machine.

While DeArco used a 3D printer himself, you can also have the 3D printing done through services like Shapeways.

The result of this process is a lithophane that shows your photo beautifully when viewed with a backlight:

DeArco used this technique to create photo lithophanes to give out to family and friends as Christmas cards this year. Needless to say, lithophanes of your photos could make unique and creative gifts for people in your year-round.

You can find more of DeArco’s photos and videos on his website, Facebook, YouTube, and Instagram.


Source: PetaPixel

3D Printing Your Photo as a Lithophane

JOBY’s New GorillaPod Mobile Rig Has New Arms for Accessories

JOBY’s New GorillaPod Mobile Rig Has New Arms for Accessories

JOBY today announced a new GorillaPod model called the GorillaPod Mobile Rig. It’s a flexible tripod that builds upon the original classic by adding more arms for holding more accessories.

While the original GorillaPod has three flexible arms for stabilizing your camera, the GorillaPod Mobile Rig is designed for content creators and has two additional arms jutting out the sides.

These detachable arms have standard ¼”-20 tripod connections and come with two cold shoe mounts and one GoPro mount to hold things like microphones, lights, and additional small cameras.

“The GorillaPod Mobile Rig is flexible, portable and easy to use, making it the essential tool for any content creator, vlogger or journalist creating pro-grade video,” JOBY says.

Features and specs include tilting (for selfies), landscape/portrait shooting modes, a weight of just 12.8oz (362g), a pro-grade locking GripTight mount for smartphones.

Here’s a short video introducing the new GorillaPod Mobile Rig:

The GorillaPod Mobile Rig works with any smartphone and will be available for $100 starting today through the JOBY website.


Source: PetaPixel

JOBY’s New GorillaPod Mobile Rig Has New Arms for Accessories

Shutterstock Bans Unnatural Photos of Apes and Monkeys

Shutterstock Bans Unnatural Photos of Apes and Monkeys

Shutterstock has banned all unnatural photos of apes and monkeys. The move by the world’s largest subscription-based stock-photo agency comes in response to an appeal by the animal rights organization PETA.

In a letter to Shutterstock, PETA argued that monkeys and apes suffer when used for photo shoots and that photos of them in unnatural settings does harm to conservation efforts while boosting the illegal wildlife trade.

PETA further wrote that the chimpanzee facial expression commonly interpreted as a “grin” by humans is actually a “fear grimace.”

“Great apes used in these images are typically torn away from their mothers shortly after birth, causing lifelong psychological trauma to both mother and infant,” PETA says. “When they reach adolescence, trainers often discard them in substandard facilities where they may be kept alone in small cages for decades.”

In response, Shutterstock has now agreed to ban photos and videos of apes and monkeys in a number of unnatural scenarios, including wearing clothes or accessories, inside a human environment or studio (e.g. in a circus), exhibiting trained behavior (e.g. dancing), and engaging in unnatural interactions with humans (e.g. holding hands or being held).

In addition to real photos, digitally modified photos that place apes and chimpanzees into these “unnatural situations” are also banned from Shutterstock.

Photos that are still allowed include images of these animals in zoos, in natural habitats, and in Asian cities — the macaques that inhabit certain temples in Asia, for example.

“By banning unnatural images of exploited ape and monkey ‘actors,’ Shutterstock has made a huge difference for nonhuman primates, both those in the wild and those suffering in captivity,” says PETA Primatologist Julia Gallucci. “Ad agencies and film and television producers have already moved away from using these harmful images, and we hope other stock-photo providers follow Shutterstock’s lead.”


Image credits: Header illustration based on still frame from Planet of the Apes (1968) by APJAC Productions/20th Century Fox. Ape photo by Sridhar Rangarajan and licensed under CC BY-SA 4.0


Source: PetaPixel

Shutterstock Bans Unnatural Photos of Apes and Monkeys

How to Keep Client Contacts Up-to-Date and Organized

How to Keep Client Contacts Up-to-Date and Organized

To keep track of photo editors and creatives as they move to new jobs, Emiliano Granado relies on social media to see if they post news. “I’ll take a screen shot of that to remind myself or ask [an assistant] to update their mailing address,” he says. Photographers Ricky Rhodes says he uses Instagram to keep track of art buyers and photo editors he knows. “People tend to move around a lot in this industry and I find this the easiest way to keep up with everyone that I’ve met.”

Rhodes also creates “simple Word documents full of notes” from in-person meetings. “After a few years of meetings across the country, it gets hard to keep track of everyone you’ve met, what clients they are working with, and what you talked about when you met,” he explains. He categorizes his notes by city, so he can reference them when he travels back to a place. “The notes that I keep really help me remember minute details that I may otherwise forget.” See more in our story “How to Build and Organize Your Marketing Database.”

Related:
How Rolling Stone.com Finds and Hires Photographers
Ilise Benun on Creating a Marketing Plan That Works for You
Selin Maitreya on Having a Product to Sell, and Marketing It with Consistency
WIRED Magazine’s Maria Lokke: Who I’ve Hired

The post How to Keep Client Contacts Up-to-Date and Organized appeared first on PDNPulse.


Source: PDN Pulse

How to Keep Client Contacts Up-to-Date and Organized

Chelsea Lankes Believes in Her Art, and You Should Too

Chelsea Lankes Believes in Her Art, and You Should Too
Nashville-based singer-songwriter Chelsea Lankes is well aware of the immense impact that her raw electro-pop art could have. Just several years ago, the Fort Worth, Texas-born musician transplanted to L.A. to pursue a full-fledged pop music career, but unfortunately found herself down on her luck without the success she was searching for. What she did discover, though, was that perhaps that moment in time wasn’t exactly her moment, as well as strength within herself. She said that she had to…

Keep on reading: Chelsea Lankes Believes in Her Art, and You Should Too
Source: V Magazine

Chelsea Lankes Believes in Her Art, and You Should Too

These Guns Are Made of Camera Gear

These Guns Are Made of Camera Gear

Photographer Jason Siegel is still using old camera equipment to share an anti-violence message in a creative way. Since we featured his work at the beginning of 2017, Siegel has created even more guns and weapons of war using various cameras, lenses, and accessories for his project Shoot Portraits, Not People.

Here are some of Siegel’s latest pieces in the series, created in collaboration with sculptor Keith D’Angelo:

And in case you missed the first feature a year ago, here are a few more of Siegel’s previous creations:

Siegel’s camera gear weapons were just exhibited at the EVOKE Contemporary’s Railyard gallery space.

Sniper rifles, Uzis, claymore mines and even a 1947 Willys Jeep […] occupy the gallery in a jarring and immersive display of military paraphernalia. Upon closer inspection of this provocative exhibit, however, we find lenses disguised as grenades, photo winders in place of triggers and film canisters strung together as ammunition belts. Denver-based duo Siegel and D’Angelo, professional photographer and accomplished metal artist respectively, build anatomically correct weapons from sourced camera parts to create interactive and powerful installations that comment on the violent abuse of these artful machines, while cleverly exposing the shared vocabulary associated with photography and weaponry.

Both the guns and limited edition prints of the weapons were offered for sale in the exhibition with dog tags attached to each sculpture to serve as the price tag.

Here’s a behind-the-scenes video showing Siegel at work:

You can find more of Siegel’s work on his website and Instagram (warning: much of Siegel’s non-weaponry photography may not be work safe).


Source: PetaPixel

These Guns Are Made of Camera Gear

Interview: NASA Astronaut Randy Bresnik on Photography from the ISS

Interview: NASA Astronaut Randy Bresnik on Photography from the ISS

Astronaut photographers on the International Space Station have dazzled us for years with eye-popping photos and videos shot from orbit. To learn more behind-the-scenes details of photography on the space station, photographer Jared Polin interviewed NASA astronaut Randy Bresnik.

In the 21-minute interview above, Bresnik discusses everything from his favorite camera equipment onboard the ISS to the radiation damage that happens to the Nikon DSLR sensors in space.

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Good morning from @iss. Karachi Pakistan

A post shared by NASA Astronaut Randy Bresnik (@astrokomrade) on

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You can find more of Bresnik’s photos on his Instagram account, which is followed by over 144,000 people.


Source: PetaPixel

Interview: NASA Astronaut Randy Bresnik on Photography from the ISS

Obsessively Taking Selfies is Now a Real Mental Disorder Called ‘Selfitis’

Obsessively Taking Selfies is Now a Real Mental Disorder Called ‘Selfitis’

In 2014, a viral story being circulated online reported that the American Psychiatric Association (APA) had coined “selfitis” as a new mental disorder for people who obsessively shoot and share selfies online. That story turned out to be a hoax, but it sparked new research. Now, three years later, selfitis is real.

Researchers Janarthanan Balakrishnan of the Thiagarajar School of Management in Madura, India, and Mark D. Griffiths of Nottingham Trent University in Nottingham, UK, have published a new paper in the International Journal of Mental Health and Addiction titled “An Exploratory Study of ‘Selfitis’ and the Development of the Selfitis Behavior Scale.”

The study created a Selfitis Behavior Scale (SBS) that aimed to classify selfie-obsessed people into degrees of exhibiting selfitis.

First, the researchers came up with a set of factors that drive people to shoot selfies obsessively:

They then found 225 students from two schools in India universities and classified them as borderline, acute, and chronic — three proposed levels of selfitis in the 2014 hoax.

Of the participants, 34% were borderline, 40.5% were acute, and 25.5% were chronic. Men were found to exhibit selfitis at a higher rate than women — 57.5% compared to 42.5%, respectively. Younger people in the 16-20-year-old age group were also found to be the most susceptible.

9% of participants shot more than 8 selfies every day and 25% shared at least 3 of those selfies on social media.

“Typically, those with the condition suffer from a lack of self-confidence and are seeking to ‘fit in’ with those around them and may display symptoms similar to other potentially addictive behaviors,” Balakrishnan tells the New York Post. “Now the existence of the condition appears to have been confirmed, it is hoped that further research will be carried out to understand more about how and why people develop this potentially obsessive behavior and what can be done to help people who are the most affected.”

(via SpringerLink via Digital Trends)


Source: PetaPixel

Obsessively Taking Selfies is Now a Real Mental Disorder Called ‘Selfitis’

The 10 Best Albums of 2017

The 10 Best Albums of 2017
Presented in no particular order…
Lana Del Rey, Lust For Life 
From 2016, it was pretty obvious that 2017 was going to be absolutely hellish. However, Lana Del Rey emerging as the beacon of comfort and hope this year was something that wouldn’t have even crossed our minds back then. But lo and behold, here she is, with her cherries and wine, rosemary and thyme, and a shoulder to cry on. On Lust For Life, Lana takes a step out from herself and examines the outside world (from the H…

Keep on reading: The 10 Best Albums of 2017
Source: V Magazine

The 10 Best Albums of 2017