This is What Happens When You Microwave a DSLR Camera

This is What Happens When You Microwave a DSLR Camera

The folks at Daytripper Photo recently decided to find out what happens when you microwave a DSLR camera in the name of science. The 11-minute video above documents how the Nikon D60 and 18-135mm lens fared (spoiler: not well).

The camera was placed in a microwave sitting out in the middle of a grassy yard.

After 5 minutes in the microwave, portions of the DSLR were beginning to melt. The LCD screen on the back had melted and things were falling apart in the grip area.

After several more minutes of being bombarded with microwaves, most of the DSLR’s plastic had melted away, exposing the electronics within. The lens fared well, though.

Here are some photos showing what the Nikon D60 and lens looked like afterward:

A few years ago, people shared viral “information” about how you can fully charge an iPhone battery by microwaving it for just one minute. As this demonstration showed, you should not microwave your electronic devices.

They won’t charge. They’ll melt.


Image credits: Photographs by Daytripper Photo and used with permission


Source: PetaPixel

This is What Happens When You Microwave a DSLR Camera

Watch Katy Perry Go Antoinette In New “Hey Hey Hey” Video

Watch Katy Perry Go Antoinette In New “Hey Hey Hey” Video
Katy Perry’s Witness era has been filled with dance bops, an ultra-revealing four-day livestream, and music videos that are just as vivid and comical as we’ve come to expect from the pop star. And to end the year, she wanted to give us just one more “fun, triumphant piece of pop candy.” And so, the music video for Witness cut “Hey Hey Hey” was materialized and is now finally here.
“‘Hey Hey Hey’ is one of my favorite songs from Witness and for me, it embodies the fighting spirit I always w…

Keep on reading: Watch Katy Perry Go Antoinette In New “Hey Hey Hey” Video
Source: V Magazine

Watch Katy Perry Go Antoinette In New “Hey Hey Hey” Video

Idaho Gets First International Dark Sky Reserve in the United States

Idaho Gets First International Dark Sky Reserve in the United States

Looking for exceptionally dark skies in the United States? It seems Idaho is the place to visit. A large patch of land in central Idaho has just been designated the first International Dark Sky Reserve in the country, and it’s one of only 12 such reserves on Earth.

The designation was announced this week by the International Dark-Sky Association (IDA), which picked an area spanning 1,400 square miles (3,600 square km) from Ketchum/Sun Valley to Stanley. The reserve becomes the 3rd largest of the 12 reserves.

IDA says that the designation comes after two decades of Idahoans working to limit light pollution on the region’s environment. Becoming a reserve will further help the area combat the use of artificial light.

“IDA’s Reserve designation requires public and private lands to possess an exceptional or distinguished quality of night sky, view of the stars and nocturnal environment,” the association says. “Reserves can only be formed through partnerships of multiple land managers who have recognized the value of quality nighttime environment through regulation and long-term planning.”

Here’s a list of the 12 current Dark Sky Reserves:

  • Aoraki Mackenzie (New Zealand)
  • Brecon Beacons National Park (Wales)
  • Central Idaho (U.S.)
  • Exmoor National Park (England)
  • Kerry (Ireland)
  • Mont-Mégantic (Québec)
  • Moore’s Reserve (South Downs, England)
  • NamibRand Nature Reserve (Namibia)
  • Pic du Midi (France)
  • Rhön (Germany)
  • Snowdonia National Park (Wales)
  • Westhavelland (Germany)

The Central Idaho Dark Sky Reserve has achieved “Gold Tier” status, which is reserved for the darkest skies around the world.

(via IDA via Earther)


Image credits: Header photo by Charles Knowles and licensed under CC BY 2.0


Source: PetaPixel

Idaho Gets First International Dark Sky Reserve in the United States

Catwalk Calling: Armani Privé Travels To Another Galaxy For SS11 Couture

Catwalk Calling: Armani Privé Travels To Another Galaxy For SS11 Couture
Behind each Haute Couture collection is a spellbinding story that encapsulates fantasy, whimsy, and inventiveness of epic proportions. Since the inception of Armani’s eponymous couture collection in 2005, the Italian designer has remained steadfast throughout his career, first positioning himself as a true menswear innovator with his sharply cut suits in the ‘80s and later expanding his repertoire to include unrivaled red-carpet gowns for Hollywood’s most elite starlets.
In anticipation…

Keep on reading: Catwalk Calling: Armani Privé Travels To Another Galaxy For SS11 Couture
Source: V Magazine

Catwalk Calling: Armani Privé Travels To Another Galaxy For SS11 Couture

Annie Leibovitz is Teaching Her First-Ever Online Photography Class

Annie Leibovitz is Teaching Her First-Ever Online Photography Class

Want to take a class from one of the world’s best photographers from the comfort of your own home? Renowned portrait photographer Annie Leibovitz is teaching her first-ever online class through the education platform MasterClass.

“In her first-ever online class, award-winning photographer Annie Leibovitz teaches her process for working with light, creating concepts, and finding your point of view as an artist,” Masterclass says. “Through case studies and on-site lessons with Annie during a magazine shoot, you’ll learn her photography techniques and be inspired to try new ways of approaching your craft.”

Here’s a 2-minute trailer introducing the class:

Anna-Lou “Annie” Leibovitz is one of the preeminent American portrait photographers, and her career spans four decades. Here are just some of her accomplishments: she was the first female chief photographer at Rolling Stone, she was the first woman to hold an exhibition at the National Portrait Gallery, and her photos have graced hundreds of covers on top magazines around the world.

Here’s a rundown of the subjects covered by Leibovitz in her new course:

  1. Research your subject
  2. Sharpen your observation
  3. Come up with photo concepts
  4. Establish a rapport with your subject
  5. Create effective lighting
  6. Develop your storytelling
  7. Approach photography as both an art and craft
  8. Improve your skills by taking family portraits

The class consists of 14 video lessons, a downloadable class workbook (with lesson recaps, assignments, and resources), and office hours (upload videos to get feedback). Leibovitz will also answer “select student questions,” Masterclass says.

If you’re interested in taking this course, you can do so for $90 over on the Masterclass website.


Source: PetaPixel

Annie Leibovitz is Teaching Her First-Ever Online Photography Class

The Forgotten Photographer of Soviet Uzbekistan

The Forgotten Photographer of Soviet Uzbekistan

As Central Asia was transformed under Soviet rule, one man made a remarkable record of life in the fledgling Uzbek S.S.R. before being driven from his career and toward tragedy.

A worker’s rally in the courtyard of a textile mill in Tashkent. Between 1925 and 1949, photographer Max Penson documented life in Soviet Uzbekistan. Photo by Max Penson.
Max Penson sits for a self portrait. The photographer was born in what is today Belarus in 1893, but fled anti-Semitic violence there after the outbreak of World War I to settle in what would become Uzbekistan. Photo by Max Penson.
Girls in a classroom in Tashkent. Penson began his new life in Central Asia as an art teacher. Photo by Max Penson.
One of Penson’s early photographs showing a runner cheered by burqa-clad women. After winning a camera as a reward for excellence in teaching, the young immigrant threw himself into photography. Photo by Max Penson.
A woman poses with a panel of traditional Uzbek embroidery. Penson was soon employed by the Soviet newspaper Pravda Vostoka (Truth Of The East) to shoot Soviet propaganda images as well as daily life. Photo by Max Penson.
Portrait of a railway worker. Penson reportedly committed himself to shooting “one roll [of film] a day.” Photo by Max Penson.
Two old Jewish men in Bukhara. Most of Penson’s work was shot with 35mm film cameras, though some pictures, like this one, were shot on large-format glass plates. Photo by Max Penson.
Pharaonic scenes as workers hack out the Great Ferghana Canal in 1939. The 270-kilometer waterway redirected a river toward the cotton fields of southern Uzbekistan. The successful completion of the canal inspired the disastrous rerouting of rivers that would later bleed the Aral Sea nearly dry. Photo by Max Penson.
A Russian instructor teaching Uzbek students. Soviet rule in Uzbekistan was marked by the repression of Islam and the promotion of literacy. Photo by Max Penson.
Women in burqas on the streets of Tashkent. Scenes like this became increasingly rare under Soviet rule. Photo by Max Penson.
A stern-faced young Uzbek girl reading one of Lenin’s tomes. Photo by Max Penson.
The workshop of sculptor N. Krasovsky in 1943. The chiseled figure of a miner was later installed in central Tashkent. Photo by Max Penson.
A boy with puppies on a collective farm. Photo by Max Penson.
A nurse hoses down a patient in a photograph titled In The Hospital. Photo by Max Penson.
A clown, clowning for Penson’s camera. Photo by Max Penson.
Young men training at a stadium in 1940. An estimated 1.4 million people from Uzbekistan fought in the Red Army during World War II. Photo by Max Penson.
A boy serving as a “Live Emblem” during a march in central Tashkent. The banner proclaims a readiness “for labor and defense!” Photo by Max Penson.
A stockpile of newly picked cotton. Photo by Max Penson.
A picker flops himself onto a pile of freshly gathered cotton. Photo by Max Penson.
A high-stakes tightrope walker in the 1940s. Photo by Max Penson.
A lineup of young athletes in 1946. During World War II, Uzbekistan’s demographic was altered dramatically when some of the U.S.S.R’s heavy industry, along with its ethnic Russian and Ukrainian workforce, was evacuated to Central Asia. Photo by Max Penson.
Two acrobats with an arm-quivering display of strength. Photo by Max Penson.
A toddler chain at a kindergarten in the early 1940s. Photo by Max Penson.
Tamara Khanum, an Uzbek dancer of Armenian origin who was famous for being the first Uzbek woman to perform without an Islamic veil. Photo by Max Penson.
A young Pioneer trumpets the march of youngsters along a riverbank. Photo by Max Penson.
A gymnast poses near Komsomol Lake in Old Tashkent. By the end of the war, the anti-Semitism that had driven Penson from his homeland was rearing its head across the U.S.S.R. Photo by Max Penson.
A portrait of Stalin oversees work on a collective farm. In 1948, as Stalin’s anti-Jewish purges intensified, Penson was fired from Pravda Vostoka. Photo by Max Penson.
Max Penson later in life, languishing without employment and growing increasingly poor. The photographer committed suicide in 1959. Photo by Max Penson.
Two local girls at a parade. Despite Penson’s masterful work, his contribution to photographic history has been scarcely recognized. Photo by Max Penson.
Shafts of sunlight in the Hall of the Supreme Council in Tashkent. In 1998, The New York Times spoke to members of Penson’s family who maintain a large archive of the photographer’s work in Tashkent. “The Uzbek government is not interested in promoting him because he was not Uzbek,” his son-in-law said. “But the Russian Embassy told us that they wouldn’t sponsor a show because he wasn’t Russian, and the Israelis told us they weren’t interested because he didn’t concentrate on Jewish themes. ” Photo by Max Penson.

About the author: Amos Chapple is a Kiwi photographer who makes news-flavored travel photos. He started off at New Zealand’s largest daily paper in 2003. After two years chasing news, he took a full-time position shooting UNESCO World Heritage sites. In 2012, he went freelance but kept up the travel. Since then, he has been published in most major news titles around the world. You can find more of his work on his website, Facebook, and Instagram. This article was also published Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty.


Source: PetaPixel

The Forgotten Photographer of Soviet Uzbekistan

The Street Photography of Rinzi Ruiz

The Street Photography of Rinzi Ruiz

Rinzi Ruiz is a talented photographer who discovered his passion for street photography on the sidewalks of downtown Los Angeles. Here’s a great 4-minute interview with Ruiz by StreetShootr about his mindset and work.

“I see light,” Ruiz says. “Basically what I’ve trained my eyes to focus on is the quality and the value of light. So a lot of it’s just that. That’s all I’m looking for.”

Here’s a selection of street photos that Ruiz shared with PetaPixel:

You can find more of Ruiz’s work on his photography and street photography workshop websites.


Source: PetaPixel

The Street Photography of Rinzi Ruiz

Alex Potter Wins First $10K James W. Foley Fellowship

Alex Potter Wins First K James W. Foley Fellowship

Photographer Alex Potter (right) has won the inaugural James W. Foley Fellowship for young journalists, fellowship administrator The GroundTruth Project announced last week. Potter will use the $10,000 fellowship to pursue a project about the effects of conflict on children in the Middle East.

“I am delighted that she will be continuing Jim’s legacy of moral courage and commitment to the truth,” said Diane Foley, Jim Foley’s mother and the founder and executive director of the James W. Foley Foundation. Foley was captured by ISIS while reporting on the Syrian civil war and murdered in 2014.

Potter, who is a trained nurse, has worked in the Middle East as both a journalist and caregiver. She was one of 250 applicants—including 100 photographers—for the fellowship. “Alex’s application stood out from the rest,” says Kevin D. Grant, co-founder and executive editor of The GroundTruth Project. “Her personal investment in public service is very much in keeping with Jim Foley’s model of journalism as public service…[and her] proposal resonated with the selection committee for its thoughtful approach and its focus on the victims of the fighting, particularly children, and how they are recovering.”

Applicants were asked to submit proposals about “education, health, culture, art, food, faith and other expressions of life in a region where too often reporters cover only conflict,” according to GroundTruth’s call for applications in October.

Funding for the fellowship is provided by the James W. Foley Foundation, with additional funding provided by New Yorke-based Correspondents’ Fund, a non-profit that provides funding and emergency relief for journalists in the US and abroad.

Related:
Danish Photojournalist Released in Syria after 13 Months in Captivity
Photographer Kamaran Najm’s Friends Break Silence on His 2014 Kidnapping

The post Alex Potter Wins First $10K James W. Foley Fellowship appeared first on PDNPulse.


Source: PDN Pulse

Alex Potter Wins First K James W. Foley Fellowship

How to Get Better Work from Your Retoucher

How to Get Better Work from Your Retoucher

“Often times, the dialogue that happens between a retoucher and photographer before the shoot can result in a strategy or new idea that can significantly improve the final product,” says retoucher Zach Vitale. He often advises photographers on how to shoot elements for a composite and what variations and exposures he’ll need for post-production to put all the elements together in a believable way. The communication should then continue. If a client asks for a last minute change, keep your retoucher informed, Vitale advises. If the changes are complex, he says, “I set extra time aside for post-production, communicate any potential scheduling issues as a result of it, and bring up any budget issues that might arise due to the extra work. It ends up saving a ton of headaches later on.”

See: “How To Make Your Retoucher Happy

Related:
14 Great Image Editing Programs for Photographers
Is the Future Unretouched?

The post How to Get Better Work from Your Retoucher appeared first on PDNPulse.


Source: PDN Pulse

How to Get Better Work from Your Retoucher

Steidl Ordered to Pay Photog $77K for 49 Lost Prints

Steidl Ordered to Pay Photog K for 49 Lost Prints

A German court has ordered the book publisher Steidl to pay photographer Lawrence Schwartzwald €65,000 ($77,392) in damages for accidentally discarding or destroying 49 portfolio prints, according to an Artnet News report.

Schwartzwald’s collection of candid photographs showed New Yorkers reading. He sent the 49 prints to Steidl in 2014 hoping to have them published as a book. According to Schwartwald, Steidl notified him in 2015 that the work wouldn’t be published. He told Artnet News that he asked Steidl to “please return my portfolio prints.”

They never arrived, so Schwartzwald sued the publisher in 2016. He valued the prints at $1,200 each.

Gerhard Steidl, publisher and company founder, told Artnet News that he didn’t reject Schwartzwald’s book; he just couldn’t publish it quickly enough, so Schwartzwald asked Steidl to return the prints.

But Steidl admitted that he had lost Schwartzwald’s work. “It just couldn’t be found,” he told Artnet News. “I didn’t sell it, auction it, or put it under my bed, it’s just not there anymore.”

Steidl’s lawyers told Artnet News that the prints were “most likely shredded according to the usual office procedures, as senders do not typically ask for the return of portfolio proofs.” (In 2013, Steidl told PDN that he receives 1,200 unsolicited book proposals per year.)

The lawyers called the situation “regrettable.”

Related Articles
Why Gerhard Steidl is a Book Publishing Master

How to Submit a Book Proposal to Gerhard Steidl

The post Steidl Ordered to Pay Photog $77K for 49 Lost Prints appeared first on PDNPulse.


Source: PDN Pulse

Steidl Ordered to Pay Photog K for 49 Lost Prints