Nikon D500 Says Battery Empty with 25% Juice Left: Report

Nikon D500 Says Battery Empty with 25% Juice Left: Report

If you’re a Nikon D500 owner who feels like batteries run out of juice faster in the camera than in other Nikon DSLRs, it may not be just you. A new report suggests that the D500 measures remaining capacity differently and doesn’t use up all available charge.

Photographer Martin Beran brought the issue to light in a new report published over at Nikon Rumors.

“I found one surprising issue related to how Nikon D500 measures remaining battery capacity,” Beran writes. “D500 displays lower remains capacity than what other Nikon bodies do.”

Through his experiments, he found that an official EN-EL15 or EN-EL15a battery that shows as completely empty in a D500 is still able to shoot 100 to 200 more photos in other Nikon DSLRs. Here’s a short video he made to demonstrate this “Batterygate” issue:

And although the D500 shows fully-charged batteries as 100% correctly in the battery indicator, partially used batteries always show less charge remaining than on other compatible Nikon bodies (Beran has tested this with the D7200, D750, D810, and D850).

“The less capacity is remaining, the difference between D500 and others is bigger,” Beran writes. “If a battery has about 20-30% of remaining capacity in other bodies, the D500 qualify such battery as empty and does not turn on at all.”

Beran created this chart showing how the remaining capacities of six different batteries were measured in 5 different Nikon DSLR bodies:

Chart by Martin Beran and via Nikon Rumors.

Beran also tested this on multiple D500 units of different ages just to make sure it wasn’t a flaw with a single camera or a single batch from the factory.

After contacting Nikon Service, Beran learned that Nikon isn’t aware of any differences in battery metering between the Nikon D500 and other Nikon cameras.


If you own a Nikon D500, have you felt that the battery meter is inaccurate?

“My conclusion is that all D500 cameras by design measure remaining capacity of battery lower than other Nikon bodies,” Beran writes. “What makes me confused is the fact that Nikon D500 is not able to fully utilize the capacity of the battery. The number of shots per battery can be about 25% higher if D500 would be able to utilize the battery the same way as other bodies.”


Source: PetaPixel

Nikon D500 Says Battery Empty with 25% Juice Left: Report

Beware 500px’s (Very) ‘Flexible Pricing’

Beware 500px’s (Very) ‘Flexible Pricing’

Are you a freelance photographer like myself? Have you already put up your masterpiece on 500px? Maybe you’re trying to share your photos and sell them at the same time in case some stranger admires your work? If you’ve answered YES to all these questions, I’d like to share the terrible experience I had with 500px.

First off, by choosing to sell your work on 500px, you must agree to all the terms and conditions specified in a document called the Contributor Agreement. Then, you will see a list of prices next to each picture indicating how much each license costs if sold.

Of course, I’m completely okay with 500px earning some sort of commission in order for the platform to function properly. However, the real problem for me lies in a paragraph written in the Contributor Agreement.

Company (and its Distributors) shall have complete and sole discretion regarding the terms, conditions and pricing of Selected Images licensed to customers without the need for any consultation with Contributor. Company and its Distributors may enter into licensing arrangements for a quantity of Images, and may need to calculate royalties based on a ratio of Contributor Images licensed to the total number of Images licensed.

At first glance, this agreement didn’t present any issues for me, but unfortunately that all changed after a recent experience. When I reviewed my sales history, I realized that I’ve fallen into a trap by signing onto the Agreement.

Two pictures of mine (named “Chrono Cross”) were sold for three different licenses.

My photos titled “Chrono Cross”

A $149 Large picture was sold for just $27, a $299 Unlimited Print was only sold for $3.96, and a Products for Resales purchase that was priced at $748 only earned me $8.

($27 + $3.96 + $8) x 2 = $77.90.

$77.90 was my total pay for the three different licenses for each photo that were priced at a total of $2,392. Payment was done through PayPal, and my total take-home earnings were $54.54! As you can see, the price gap was quite significant.

The Agreement does not specify the selling price and royalty ratio. In regard to setting prices for buyers, 500px has 100% control! Below is the response I received from 500px after I filed a complaint:

Some clients come to us asking to purchase a large volume of images so our sales team will often negotiate a discount; other times we offer promotional pricing to incentivize new buyers. Being flexible with our pricing gives us leeway to entice more clients to do business with us, clients that will pay full price the next time they make a purchase, and the time after that! As a business, this is why we need full discretion over pricing and ask that our contributors trust us to manage their sales effectively. We value all contributing photographers and we are proud to license your work.

After reading this reply, it’s difficult to see that the hard work and dedication of a photographer goes unnoticed because 500px decided to sell my pictures like scrap papers! I feel as if I were a garment factory worker being squeezed dry by the fashion industry, or a coffee bean farmer being treated unfairly by a coffee company.

Second, I do not know the actual price my photos were sold for or the percentage I was paid in royalties! All I saw was that the price list showed a much, much higher value than what I actually got paid.

After emailing them multiple times, I received the same response every time. 500px kept on telling me that with the Agreement in hand, they had done nothing wrong.

From the morality standpoint, I believe the Contributor Agreement is extremely unreasonable. I’ve already demanded that 500px remove all my photos from their site. To all the freelance photographers out there, think twice before you sign that 500px Contributor Agreement.


About the author: Ajax Lee is a fashion photographer based in Taiwan. The opinions expressed in this article are solely those of the author. You can find more of his work on his website, Facebook, and Instagram.


Source: PetaPixel

Beware 500px’s (Very) ‘Flexible Pricing’

Oops: SkyPixel 2017 Gave 1st Prize to a Non-Drone Photo Shot in 2014

Oops: SkyPixel 2017 Gave 1st Prize to a Non-Drone Photo Shot in 2014

Earlier this month, DJI announced the winning photos for its prestigious SkyPixel 2017 aerial photo competition. The photos are certainly inspiring, but it seems that one of the 1st prize winners was neither shot with a drone nor captured in 2017…

The first prize in the Professional Landscape category was awarded to Burmese photographer Zay Yar Lin for this photo titled “Sun’s Up, Nets Out“:

“An Intha fisherman sets up his net to fish as he paddles his boat with a unique leg-rowing technique in Mayanmar’s Inle Lake,” the description reads.

The rules of SkyPixel 2017 state that (1) “Photos must be from 2017”, and (2) “Photographs from any aerial platform are welcome.”

It seems that Lin’s photo doesn’t meet either of those conditions… unless standing at a high location while holding a DSLR can be considered shooting with an “aerial platform.”

PetaPixel was informed by a tipster that the photo had previously been submitted to prestigious awards in the past few years, a fact that SkyPixel was apparently unaware of.

Lin’s photo page on National Geographic’s Your Shot lists the EXIF details for the photo. The photo was captured on December 26th, 2014, using a Nikon D750 DSLR. The following year, Lin submitted it to the Nat Geo 2015 Traveler Photo Contest.

The photo was also submitted to the 2016 Sony World Photography Awards and was selected as a top entry in the Amateur Photographer of the Year 2016 contest.

“The image was taken from a high bamboo stage built near the fishing place in the lake for photography purposes,” Lin told Amateur Photographer in May 2016.

Still, SkyPixel 2017 selected Lin’s photo as one of the best aerial photos of 2017 and awarded him $7,709 worth of prizes, including a DJI Phantom 4 Pro Obsidian and a Nikon D850 DSLR.


Source: PetaPixel

Oops: SkyPixel 2017 Gave 1st Prize to a Non-Drone Photo Shot in 2014

Samsung Galaxy S9 and S9+ Boast the First Dual Aperture Lens

Samsung Galaxy S9 and S9+ Boast the First Dual Aperture Lens

Samsung has just announced the S9 and S9+ smartphones, which feature what Samsung says is the company’s most advanced camera ever. The low-light camera is the first in the smartphone industry to use a dual aperture lens.

“Good lighting is the secret to any great photo,” Samsung says. “But often, photos are taken in less-than-ideal lighting conditions and most smartphone cameras have a fixed aperture that can’t adjust to low or bright lighting environments resulting in grainy or washed out pictures.”

The Samsung Galaxy S9 (left) and S9+ (right) side-by-side.

Samsung’s solution to this problem is a new camera that operates more like a human eye, which expands and contracts its iris. The new Dual Aperture lens can toggle between f/1.5 and f/2.4 depending on the situation.

The lens “lets in more light when it’s dark and less light when it’s too bright, taking photos that are crisp and clear anytime, anywhere,” Samsung says.

The S9 features a single 12-megapixel rear camera, while the S9+ uses a dual camera setup (the wide-angle dual aperture lens 12MP camera and a 12MP telephoto camera). Both phones have Dual Pixel wide angle sensors, optical image stabilization, and both feature an 8-megapixel front camera.

Other camera-related features of both cameras include 960fps super slow-mo, Motion Detection (auto-recording when motion is detected in the frame), portrait mode (on the S9+), and combining up to 12 distinct photos into a high-quality photo.

Non-photo features include AR Emoji, augmented reality with Bixby (Samsung’s intelligence platform), AKG stereo speakers, surround sound, edge-to-edge displays (5.8in on the S9 and 6.2-in on the S9+), water/dust resistance, wireless charging, memory that’s expandable to 400GB, and biometric authentication (iris, fingerprint, facial).

The Samsung Galaxy S9 and S9+ will be available in three colors (Lilac Purple, Midnight Black, and Coral Blue) starting on March 16, 2018, with price tags of $720 and $840 (respectively) when purchased unlocked.


Source: PetaPixel

Samsung Galaxy S9 and S9+ Boast the First Dual Aperture Lens

JW Anderson Continues His Ongoing Exploration with Converse

JW Anderson Continues His Ongoing Exploration with Converse
JW Anderson and Converse announced their latest collaboration. Simply_Complex  hones in on the merging of high fashion and street style. While the two brands sit on opposite sides of the fashion spectrum, the collab celebrates the artistry that is born of a meeting such as this. The collection features the Thunderbolt and Chuck 70 styles, which were featured in past partnerships as well.

With a keen focus on materialization, Jonathan aimed to reconstruct these iconic silhouettes to tell a …

Keep on reading: JW Anderson Continues His Ongoing Exploration with Converse
Source: V Magazine

JW Anderson Continues His Ongoing Exploration with Converse

Man Says He Ordered a $6,000 DSLR on Amazon But Got Rocks, Then Bricks

Man Says He Ordered a ,000 DSLR on Amazon But Got Rocks, Then Bricks

A popular YouTube personality with over 780,000 subscribers has caused a stir by claiming that he ordered a $6,000 DSLR from Amazon but received a camera box filled with rocks instead. And when he was sent a replacement from Amazon, the second box was filled with bricks.

Warning: There’s some strong language in the video.

Chaseontwowheels, a motorcycle vlogger, documented his experience in the 12-minute video above. He says that he originally ordered a $6,000 Canon 1D X Mark II from Amazon — it’s unclear whether the order was sold directly by Amazon or was placed with a 3rd party — and received a legitimate camera box filled with heavy rocks instead (you can watch his original rant here).

After chatting with customer service, Chaseontwowheels received an apology, $20, and a free extra month of Amazon Prime. He says the company also sent him a replacement order within two days.

The vlogger then decided to open the second package on camera just in case, and the video shows him pulling out two wrapped bricks from the Canon camera box.

The second video has attracted a significant amount of attention and discussion over on Reddit. Here’s what one commenter who says they were a former Amazon fraud investigator writes:

[T]his happens A LOT, especially with high end items (Mac Laptops, Cameras, Ipads etc). Usually this is the result of someone selling an item that is Fulfilled By Amazon (FBA). There are countless fraud markers that get set off when someone lists a product that is considered high value and high risk, which are then used to hold funds so that the fraudulent seller doesn’t get their money and Amazon can reimburse the customer etc.

However, this can also happen when someone is using a stolen credit card to buy something on Amazon. Using a fake account, they’ll list something (as FBA) and ship it to Amazon. The price can be higher than retail, so no one but the stolen credit card gets to buy it. That way, it costs them some sellers fees/shipping/storage fees and they get their money disbursed because the seller sold a product and it didn’t get returned/negative feedback etc. It happens a lot more than you think.

The consensus in the Reddit community appears to be (1) the video seems legitimate and wasn’t faked, (2) that the orders were from 3rd party sellers, and (3) that it may be the result of a scam seller or a return scam (i.e. people returned rocks and bricks in “unopened” sealed boxes that were then restocked and shipped to new customers).

The good news though, is that Amazon has a great reputation for taking care of customers after scams do happen.

(via chaseontwowheels via Fstoppers)


Source: PetaPixel

Man Says He Ordered a ,000 DSLR on Amazon But Got Rocks, Then Bricks

This Site Will Tell You If Your Accounts Have Been Compromised

This Site Will Tell You If Your Accounts Have Been Compromised

Here’s something that isn’t directly photography-related but is relevant to pretty much every photographer: if you’ve never heard of it before, you should check out the website Have I Been Pwned? It lets you search for your email addresses and passwords to see if any of your accounts have been compromised through security breaches.

The website was launched back in 2013 by Web security expert Troy Hunt, and its functionality is being adopted by major services in the industry (including 1Password). Nothing you enter into the search box is saved anywhere — it’s simply checked against the growing list of email addresses and passwords that have been leaked through major hacks.

There is currently data obtained from 269 compromised websites that have leaked over 4.8 billion user account details onto the Web. Among the compromised websites are photo-related and commonly used ones you will be familiar with (and some you likely use). Big names include Adobe, Snapchat, Imgur, Kickstarter, Comcast, Tumblr, and Dropbox.

We ran several emails to test the service and discovered breaches for every single one. For one email, the website revealed that an Adobe account used by PetaPixel was compromised and that the email and password were likely no longer secure.

In addition to looking up email addresses, there’s also a separate search form for looking up passwords.

If you find that any passwords can be found in the giant list of half a billion passwords obtained from past breaches (the site will tell you how many time it appears), you should change that password immediately and never use it again.


Source: PetaPixel

This Site Will Tell You If Your Accounts Have Been Compromised

Roberto Cavalli Shows A More Refined Side For FW18

Roberto Cavalli Shows A More Refined Side For FW18
The elegant woman’s animal print finds a seductive edge in Cavalli’s FW18 collection. Besides ice blue, crimson and royal purple the line is devoid of color and focuses on the stark contrast of animal print on white fabrics. The texture of choice is leather, with structural jackets and loosely tailored pants functioning as the main centerpieces.

Newly appointed creative director Paul Surridge took his inspiration right from Hollywood, citing Sharon Stone’s Catherine Tramell from Basic Instin…

Keep on reading: Roberto Cavalli Shows A More Refined Side For FW18
Source: V Magazine

Roberto Cavalli Shows A More Refined Side For FW18

The Steadicam Air is a $500 Monopod with a ‘Gas Pedal’

The Steadicam Air is a 0 Monopod with a ‘Gas Pedal’

Tiffen, parent company of Steadicam, has just announced the Steadicam Air. It’s a “revolutionary” new pneumatic monopod for photographers that does height adjustments using gas lift.

The carbon fiber monopod features a rubberized foot on the bottom that provides non-slip operation. When you’d like to adjust the height, instead of having to deal with leg extension and locking mechanisms, you simply step on the pedal and allow the gas lift spring to help you raise your camera up.

There are two configurations of the Steadicam Air: one with a 15-pound limit and one with a 25-pound limit. The monopod itself weighs just 3.5 pounds.

There are three sections in the monopod, and there’s one twist leg lock that allows you to have 360 degrees of rotation.

These advanced features come at a price, though: the Steadicam Air is available now for $499 for the 25-pound version, and the Steadicam Air-15 will be available later for $399.

(via Tiffen via DIYP)


Source: PetaPixel

The Steadicam Air is a 0 Monopod with a ‘Gas Pedal’

Sony Unveils the HVL-F60RM Flagship Flash with Guide Number 60

Sony Unveils the HVL-F60RM Flagship Flash with Guide Number 60

Sony just announced HVL-F60RM, the company’s new flagship flash with guide number 60. It’s a flash that “combines continuous flash performance with advanced operability and wireless control,” Sony says.

The HVL-F60RM covers illumination angles from 20mm (down to 14mm with the wide panel) up to 200mm with “uniform wide-range zoom coverage without shading.” The unit can fire off 220 flashes with a single charge of the Ni-MH rechargeable batteries, and the recycle time between flashes has been dropped to 1.7 seconds (down from 3.5 seconds). Attach the new Sony FA-EBA1 External Battery Adapter and the recycle time is further reduced to 0.6 seconds.

The flash succeeds the HVL-F60M and is up to 4 times more resistant to heat than that predecessor thanks to new algorithms and heat-resistant materials.

Quick Shift Bounce on the flash lets you switch the lens from horizontal to vertical orientation (90 degrees left/right, 150 degrees upward, and 8 degrees downward).

The flash’s functions can be assigned to the four-way controller, center button, and control wheel to put your desired adjustments at your fingertips. In manual mode, the flash can memorize and recall TTL flash output.

Wireless radio communication in the HVL-F60RM is non-directional and allows the flash to be placed anywhere within 98 feet (30 meters) of the camera. The HVL-F60RM mounted on a camera can be paired as a transmitter with up to 15 flashes assigned to 5 groups as receivers.

Other features include independent output level (-/+) buttons, a comprehensive display, a dust and moisture resistant design, an LED light and AF illuminator, and a durable redesigned metal foot.

Here’s a 1-minute video that introduces the Sony HVL-F60RM:

The Sony HVL-F60RM will be available starting in April 2018 with a price tag of $600.


Source: PetaPixel

Sony Unveils the HVL-F60RM Flagship Flash with Guide Number 60