Fujifilm Considering Bringing Back Its B&W Film: Report

Fujifilm Considering Bringing Back Its B&W Film: Report

Fujifilm killed off the last of its black-and-white film and photo paper back in April 2018. For many film photographers that news was like a dagger to the heart, but there is hope yet: Fujifilm is reportedly considering bringing its B&W film back.

The Japanese news outlet ITmedia reports that Fujifilm has “just started the examination” of relaunching film for B&W photography.

The company heard the requests of film photographers who didn’t wish to see Neopan 100 Acros be discontinued, but it still needs to solve the logistical problems — obtaining the necessary raw materials for its film production is difficult and costly, and the company’s efforts to improve production efficiency and cut costs weren’t enough to offset the constantly decreasing demand for the film.

If Fujifilm Neopan (or a different B&W stock) does make a comeback, it would be following in the heels of Kodak P3200, which is now alive and well again.

(via ITmedia via The Phoblographer)


Source: PetaPixel

Fujifilm Considering Bringing Back Its B&W Film: Report

MacBook Pro CPU Throttling Was Due to Software Bug, Apple Says

MacBook Pro CPU Throttling Was Due to Software Bug, Apple Says

Last week, reviewers reported that Apple’s latest generation of MacBook Pro laptops suffer from thermal throttling, or having the CPU run much slower than advertised during intense processing because of heat issues. If that turned you off to the laptop, there’s some good news today: Apple says the throttling was due to a software bug that has since been fixed.

Tech reviewer Dave Lee first reported the thermal throttling issue, reporting that the 15-inch MacBook Pro i9 processor “can’t even maintain the 2.9GHz base clock, which is absurd.” Lee also found that placing the MacBook Pro in a freezer resulted in an instant improvement in performance.

AppleInsider subsequently confirmed Lee’s findings, concluding that the laptop “has some pretty massive overheating issues.”

Apple released a statement today explaining its findings and announcing that the problem has been resolved:

Following extensive performance testing under numerous workloads, we’ve identified that there is a missing digital key in the firmware that impacts the thermal management system and could drive clock speeds down under heavy thermal loads on the new MacBook Pro. A bug fix is included in today’s macOS High Sierra 10.13.6 Supplemental Update and is recommended. We apologize to any customer who has experienced less than optimal performance on their new systems. Customers can expect the new 15-inch MacBook Pro to be up to 70% faster, and the 13-inch MacBook Pro with Touch Bar to be up to 2X faster, as shown in the performance results on our website.

Engadget reports that Apple also tested its fix by replicating Lee’s use of Adobe Premier and recorded a 35% speed boost by the 15-inch MacBook Pro and a 70% improvement with the 13-inch version.


Source: PetaPixel

MacBook Pro CPU Throttling Was Due to Software Bug, Apple Says

Fujifilm 33mm f/1.0 Set to Be the First Mirrorless f/1.0 Autofocus Lens

Fujifilm 33mm f/1.0 Set to Be the First Mirrorless f/1.0 Autofocus Lens

In addition to its two new lenses announced yesterday, the 200mm f/2 and the 8-16mm f/2.8, Fujifilm has also revealed three upcoming lenses that are now on its roadmap: the 16mm f/2.8, 16-80mm f/4 OIS, and 33mm f/1. The 35mm lens is the first confirmed f/1.0 autofocusing lens in the world of mirrorless cameras.

The 35mm lens will be the equivalent of a 50mm f/1.0 lens in 35mm terms. Fujifilm’s current fastest lens is the 56mm f/1.2, which costs $999.

Fujifilm is planning to launch the 35mm f/1 sometime in 2020, which is still pretty far off, and quite a bit could change in the camera industry between now and then.

Nikon is reportedly planning to announce two full frame mirrorless cameras in the coming weeks, and it’s known that Nikon recently filed a trademark in the EU for the word “Noct,” which the company historically used for ultra-fast lenses. In 2017, Nikon also patented a 52mm f/0.9 full frame mirrorless lens.

But unless another camera brand does beat Fujifilm to the punch, the newly revealed 33mm f/1.0 currently “stands to be the first mirrorless lens with a maximum aperture of F1.0 with AF capability,” Fujifilm says.

The 16mm f/2.8 and 16-80mm f/4 OIS

Fujifilm’s other two nearly revealed lenses, the 16mm f/2.8 and 16-80mm f/4 OIS, will launch a year earlier in 2019.

The Fujifilm XF 16mm f/2.8 R WR is a compact prime lens that is equivalent to a 24mm lens in 35mm terms, “making it the perfect choice for landscape and travel photography,” Fujifilm says.

The Fujifilm XF 16-80mm f/4 R OIS WR is equivalent to a 24-122mm lens in 35mm terms, and it’s intended to serve as a versatile lens that can cover a wide range of subjects and scenes.

The Latest Fujifilm Lens Roadmap

With the addition of these three upcoming lenses, here’s what the new Fujifilm lens roadmap looks like:


Source: PetaPixel

Fujifilm 33mm f/1.0 Set to Be the First Mirrorless f/1.0 Autofocus Lens

Kodak Bitcoin Mining ‘Scam’ Killed by SEC

Kodak Bitcoin Mining ‘Scam’ Killed by SEC

Back in January, the tech world balked when a Kodak-branded Bitcoin miner called the Kodak KashMiner was unveiled at the CES trade show in Las Vegas. It seems that photography and cryptocurrency enthusiasts weren’t the only ones that balked: the US Security and Exchange Commission (SEC) actually blocked the KashMiner from moving forward.

BBC News reports that the Kodak KashMiner scheme collapsed after critics called the product a “scam” and the SEC responded by halting its sale.

What’s more, Kodak tells the BBC that the third-party company behind the Kodak-branded miner, Spotlite USA, never officially licensed the Kodak brand for use on the miner, which was apparently a rebadged version of the popular Antminer S9 by the Chinese company Bitmain.

The Kodak KashMiner was to cost customers $3,400 up front for a 2-year rental period and provide them with a cut of profits from Bitcoins that were mined. Customers would reportedly earn profits of $375 a month over the course of the contract, generating profits of about $5,600.

But critics crunched the numbers and concluded that Bitcoin would need to maintain an average price of $28,000 per coin over the period to make the scheme pay out according to plan. Since January, Bitcoin’s price has plummeted to its current price of around $14,000 to less than $7,000 today.

The scheme was killed off by regulators so quickly that the company didn’t even finish the KashMiner website — some pages contained placeholder text instead of actual content.

Screenshot via BBC News.

Spotlite says it’s planning to run its own private mining operation now rather than rent out Kodak-branded miners to the public.

(via BBC News via Engadget)


Source: PetaPixel

Kodak Bitcoin Mining ‘Scam’ Killed by SEC

Nikon 500mm f/5.6 Spotted. It’s TINY!

Nikon 500mm f/5.6 Spotted. It’s TINY!

Nikon announced last month that it’s developing an ultra-portable 500mm f/5.6 PF ED VR lens. Here’s a photo of the actual lens — as you can see, Nikon wasn’t kidding when it said the 500mm lens is “ultra-portable.”

Moscow-based photojournalist Pavel Bednyakov of the newspaper Izvestia was invited to a Nikon party in Moscow yesterday as FIFA World Cup 2018 is coming to a close.

While there, the Nikon representatives showed off the first samples of the company’s new 500mm f/5.6 lens, attached to a D5 DSLR.

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The lens features a Phase Fresnel (PF) element in the design that allows the lens to be both light and compact since fewer lens elements are needed.

“Despite its 500mm focal length, the lens is small and light enough to use hand-held in a wide variety of situations where a photographer must capture unpredictable and fast-moving subjects, including sporting events and wildlife photography,” Nikon said in its announcement last month.

From his short time with the lens, Bednyakov can confirm that Nikon’s claim isn’t misleading.

“It’s really small and looks like 70-200 f/2.8 with a hood,” the photographer tells PetaPixel.

Pricing and availability of the lens have yet to be announced, but given that Nikon is already showing it off to photographers at parties, we’re guessing it’s not too far off now.


Update: Nikon Rumors is hearing that the lens has a length of 24cm (~9.5in) and a price tag of around $4,300. By comparison, the Nikon 300mm f/4 PF and 500mm f/4 (non-PF) measure 14.7cm (5.7in) and 38.5cm (15.15in), respectively, and cost $2,000 and $10,300, respectively.


Image credits: Photograph by Pavel Bednyakov and used with permission


Source: PetaPixel

Nikon 500mm f/5.6 Spotted. It’s TINY!