This is Why You Don’t Hire a $0.25 Photo Retoucher

This is Why You Don’t Hire a {$title}.25 Photo Retoucher

After discovering retouching services being offered on Fiverr, the popular platform that lets freelancers offer ultra-cheap services, photographer Irene Rudnyk recently decided to conduct an experiment to see what kind of results you can get for $10 and less.

Rudnyk hired three different retouchers at three different ultra-cheap price points: $0.25, $5, and $10.

This is the unedited photo Rudnyk sent as a RAW file to each retoucher:

She also included these requirements for what she wanted:

I would like if you made this image very vibrant, warm. Clean skin, bright eyes, and make her hair look more red, so it matches the background. Also, I trust your judgment on making this image look beautiful.

Here are the three retouched photos Rudnyk got back:

The $0.25 Retouching Job

Here’s the edit next to the original:

The $5 Retouching Job

Here’s the edit next to the original:

The $10 Retouching Job

Here’s the edit next to the original:

Rudnyk’s Edit

Here’s the edit next to the original:

“I personally would not use this website and I would not recommend this website to any professional photographers out there who are looking for retouch services,” Rudnyk says. “For $10 for one picture, I think the price is actually pretty steep for what you’re getting.”


Source: PetaPixel

This is Why You Don’t Hire a {$permalink}.25 Photo Retoucher

Dell Unveils the World’s First 49-inch Monitor with Dual QHD Resolution

Dell Unveils the World’s First 49-inch Monitor with Dual QHD Resolution

If editing panorama photos if what you do all day long, you might want to take a look at Dell’s new UltraSharp 49 Curved Monitor, model name U4919DW. It’s the world’s first 49-inch display with dual QHD resolution.

The monitor features a “revolutionary ultra-wide” 32:9 aspect ratio and is designed to replace two 27-inch QHD monitors. The massive screen real estate provides 5120×1440 in resolution and in-plane switching (IPS) technology that “allows users to view more content and see fine details with consistent color across a wide viewing angle.”

A built-in KVM switch allows you to switch between different computers as sources for the display while using the same keyboard and mouse.

Other features and specs include a 60Hz refresh rate, a USB-C port, a 99% sRGB color gamut, a 5ms response time, two HDMI 2.0 ports, 1 DisplayPort 1.4, 350cd/m² brightness, and 1,000:1 contrast.

The Dell U4919DW will start shipping on October 26th with a price tag of $1,699.


Source: PetaPixel

Dell Unveils the World’s First 49-inch Monitor with Dual QHD Resolution

Ep. 300: It Lurks in the Shadows, but Does It Matter? – and more

Ep. 300: It Lurks in the Shadows, but Does It Matter? – and more



Episode 300 of the PetaPixel Photography Podcast.
Download MP3 –  Subscribe via iTunesGoogle Playemail or RSS!

Featured: Photographer and educator, Zack Arias

In This Episode

If you subscribe to the PetaPixel Photography Podcast in iTunes, please take a moment to rate and review us and help us move up in the rankings so others interested in photography may find us.

Show Opener:
Photographer and educator, Zack Arias, opens the show. Thanks Zack!

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Stories:
If the Nikon Z7 has a striping/banding issue…is that a dealbreaker? (#)

ON1 Photo RAW 2019 delivers with powerful new features. (#)

Nikon Z and Tamron don’t play well…yet. (#)

TourBox seeks to change how you interact with your photos. (#)

5DayDeal’s Complete Photography Bundle 2018 saves photographers thousands. (#)

Microsoft makes an error with a Windows 10 update that causes grief. (#)

CamRanger goes smaller in a big way. (#)

Gitzo releases a tiny tripod with a big price tag. (#)

Researchers demonstrate the damage drones pose to aircraft. (#)

My daughter’s outros over the years.

My other podcast with Brian Matiash, the No Name Photo Show.

Connect With Us

Thank you for listening to the PetaPixel Photography Podcast! Connect with me, Sharky James on TwitterInstagram and Facebook (all @LensShark) as we build this community.

We’d love to answer your question on the show. Leave us an audio question through our voicemail widget, comment below or via social media. But audio questions are awesome!

You can also cut a show opener for us to play on the show! As an example: “Hi, this is Matt Smith with Double Heart Photography in Chicago, Illinois, and you’re listening to the PetaPixel Photography Podcast with Sharky James!”


Source: PetaPixel

Ep. 300: It Lurks in the Shadows, but Does It Matter? – and more

A Widowed Bride’s Wedding Photos with Her Groom

A Widowed Bride’s Wedding Photos with Her Groom

A bride who lost her fiancé to a tragic accident went ahead with celebrating her wedding day. The wedding photos that resulted are a powerful testament and tribute to the bond she shared with the love of her life that she lost.

25-year-old Jessica Padgett was set to marry her fiancé Kendall Murphy on September 29th, 2018. But while responding to the scene of an accident as a firefighter back in November 2017, Murphy was struck and killed by a drunk driver.

Instead of canceling her wedding day, Padgett decided to gather her family and friends at the grave in Indiana, put on her white wedding dress, and celebrate the day while creating special memories.

The wedding photographer they had booked, Mandi Knepp of Loving Life Photography, showed up at the request of Padgett’s mother-in-law and shot the wedding album.

“I wanted to still celebrate our wedding day, even though he wasn’t physically there with me,” Padgett tells BBC News. I wanted memories of the day that we were supposed to have in my dress,” she explains.

The photos were shared by Knepp through her Facebook page, where they quickly went viral online.

“I got messages from grieving people I don’t know, telling me their story and how strong and brave I was,” Padgett tells BBC News. “They said if I can do it, so can they.”


Image credits: Photographs by Mandi Knepp/Loving Life Photography and used with permission


Source: PetaPixel

A Widowed Bride’s Wedding Photos with Her Groom

Magazine Covers Shot with Phones Ain’t No Thang

Magazine Covers Shot with Phones Ain’t No Thang

Scoring a national magazine cover shoot to prove the greatness of a phone’s camera has become part of the standard PR playbook for manufacturers. TIME featured photos taken by Luisa Dörr using an iPhone for a September 2017 cover story entitled “Firsts” about women changing the world.

One of seventeen TIME covers photographed on iPhone by Luisa Dörr.

And GQ’s November 2018 cover features an image of First Man’s Ryan Gosling shot by Giampaolo Sgura on a Google Pixel 3.

Photo by Giampaolo Sgura shot with a Google Pixel 3.

On the one hand, the quality of smartphone images is a technological marvel of hardware and software that merits mention. While phones and their operating systems have entered a slow-and-steady maturation phase largely devoid of wow factors, the cameras have gotten frighteningly good year after year. In the past 18 months, phones from a variety of manufacturers have showcased the power of computational photography and machine learning – shifting photography away from its optical origins into something much more mathematical with incredible results.

Google Pixel 3 XL

On the other hand, smartphones outnumber dedicated cameras by orders of magnitude in both physical quantity as well as the number of images taken in a given time. A camera phone created in 2018 with sufficient light better be able to create an image that can be used on a magazine cover (and let’s be honest, these images are retouched anyway).

Sgura is a fine celebrity portraitist. Armed with stylists, lighting grips, and um, Ryan Gosling, he’s more than capable of producing a great image whether he’s using a top of the line DSLR or an $800 Pixel 3.

But Google’s bragging rights are moot because the wow factor is no longer there. Consumers expect great images from their expensive, pocketable computers. I’ve never wondered what camera a photographer used to shoot a cover, and phone manufacturers should stop answering the non-existent question.


About the author: Allen Murabayashi is the Chairman and co-founder of PhotoShelter, which regularly publishes resources for photographers. The opinions expressed in this article are solely those of the author. Allen is a graduate of Yale University, and flosses daily. This article was also published here.


Source: PetaPixel

Magazine Covers Shot with Phones Ain’t No Thang

‘Biennale Bitch’ Goes Behind The Scenes of the Art World

‘Biennale Bitch’ Goes Behind The Scenes of the Art World
Obviously, there’s more to the art world than just auctions and appetizers. That’s why arts reporter Nadja Sayej (author of the bestseller The Celebrity Interview Book) decided to finally put her nine years of traveling through the European art scene in writing. Her new book, Biennale Bitch, is composed of 30 short stories behind the art world articles, and off-the-record snapshots of Salma Hayek, Patti Smith, Lady Gaga, Claude Picasso, John Waters, Thom Yorke, the Wu-Tang Clan, and more.

In …

Keep on reading: ‘Biennale Bitch’ Goes Behind The Scenes of the Art World
Source: V Magazine

‘Biennale Bitch’ Goes Behind The Scenes of the Art World

Why You’ll Never Find a Camera That’s Been to the Moon on eBay

Why You’ll Never Find a Camera That’s Been to the Moon on eBay

NASA’s Apollo Program was an audacious mission to send astronauts to the moon — a national goal set by President John F. Kennedy’s in a bold speech in 1961 that was an ongoing part of the Cold War.

NASA’s use of photography aboard spacecraft originated during the Mercury Program when John Glenn carried two cameras during his Mercury-Atlas 6 program: 1) a Leica 1g for ultraviolet spectroscopic photos, and 2) a modified Ansco Autoset (which was a rebadged Minolta Hi-Matic by the Ansco Company) which took the first human-shot, color still photos.

Astronaut Wally Schirra had been using a Hasselblad 500c for his personal photography and suggested medium format to the NASA managers in charge of photographic equipment. NASA engineers modified the camera for space – removing excess weight, modifying the controls to accommodate space suits, and commissioning a custom back to hold more film. The results were so satisfying that NASA contracted Hasselblad to build kits designed specifically for space missions.

Wally Schirra examines the Hasselblad camera alongside Deke Slayton (L), and Gordon Cooper

By the time Apollo 11 made man’s maiden voyage to the lunar surface, as depicted in First Man, Hasselblad had been an important part of the space program. Neil Armstrong carried a Hasselblad 500EL Data Camera with Reseau plate, a glass plate with precise etchings that were exposed onto each shot to allow for photogrammetry. The lens of choice was a Zeiss Biogon 60mm f/5.6 lens which has a field of view roughly equivalent to a 35mm full-frame lens.

This photograph of the Lunar Module at Tranquility Base was taken by Neil Armstrong during the Apollo 11 mission, from the rim of Little West Crater on the lunar surface. Armstrong’s shadow and the shadow of the camera are visible in the foreground. This is the furthest distance from the lunar module traveled by either astronaut while on the moon. Note the cross grid formed by the Reseau plate.
AS11-40-5875 (20 July 1969) — Astronaut Edwin E. Aldrin Jr., lunar module pilot of the first lunar landing mission, poses for a photograph beside the deployed United States flag during an Apollo 11 extravehicular activity (EVA) on the lunar surface. The Lunar Module (LM) is on the left, and the footprints of the astronauts are clearly visible.
Buzz Aldrin moves toward a position to deploy two components of the Early Apollo Scientific Experiments Package (EASEP) on the surface of the moon during the Apollo 11 mission.

Although Schirra’s original Hasselblad sold at auction in 2014 for $275,000 along with its Planar f/2.8 80mm lens, you won’t ever find cameras that have made it to the lunar surface on auction.

The reason? Weight.

According to Hasselblad:

The journeys home from the moon made very special demands on what could return regarding weight, etc. So, having fulfilled their mission, a total of thirteen cameras were deemed as an encumbrance and therefore left behind. Only the film magazines containing the precious latent images were brought back.

Astronaut Alan L. Bean, Lunar Module pilot, pauses near a tool carrier during the Apollo 12 spacewalk on the moon’s surface. Commander Charles Conrad, Jr., who took the black-and-white photo, is reflected in Bean’s helmet visor.

About the author: Allen Murabayashi is the Chairman and co-founder of PhotoShelter, which regularly publishes resources for photographers. The opinions expressed in this article are solely those of the author. Allen is a graduate of Yale University, and flosses daily. This article was also published here.


Source: PetaPixel

Why You’ll Never Find a Camera That’s Been to the Moon on eBay

A Message from a Spider to Arachnophobes

A Message from a Spider to Arachnophobes

Hi, my name is Charlie and I’m a giant house spider. I share my house with a human macro photographer named Maxim Piessen. My roomie loves to take photos of insects and other small organisms. We have always been on the same wavelength.

He’s been able to capture a lot of insects using his camera. I did the same using my web. He shows people the small things in nature. I… I… Euhm… I just scare people? Apparently, I don’t have the best reputation.

With so many people being afraid of me (apparently you humans call them arachnophobes), I thought it was about time to jump from key to key on this laptop’s keyboard and tell you my side of the story. After an intensive brainstorm session with Maxim, we came to the idea of trying to understand why people fear me so much and to counter-argue these misconceptions.

Thus far, you have already read 2 paragraphs. Reading is boring, isn’t it? Even with 8 eyes and reading 4 times as quick as you do, I feel the need for visual imagery. Although I have the privilege to have 7 legs — I lost one during one of many adventures — a camera is just a bit too heavy for me AND as you all know, it’s difficult to take high quality selfies. Luckily, my roomie agreed upon my request to supplement my text with photos.

After Googling “Why are people scared of me?”, I found an interesting Quora thread titled, “Why are people scared of spiders?”.

The most viewed and most up-voted answer: “Because they’re silently creepy, wall-crawling, web-spinning, abundant egg-laying, hell-spawn creatures on Earth.”

I must say, this is a very objective answer full of scientific facts. Let’s try to portray this answer in the following photographs:

Spooky, isn’t it? This could be the poster of the next blockbuster horror movie. I would almost say I’m a (handicapped) hell-spawn creature on Earth. You don’t even see the real me. I’m silently creepy and my shadow will haunt you in your dreams.

I really love how you can add a negative connotation to the word ‘spider’ by using creepy descriptions or special photography techniques. Let’s do another example just for the fun of it.

Imagine seeing this shadow casted on your wall while being home alone. I would s**t my pants too. If only I had pants… Human stores don’t sell 7-legged pants.

Ok, now it’s time to show the real me. Ready for it? Here I am:

Am I still creepy without special effects and terrifying shadows? I can hear you thinking: “UGH, SO MANY HAIRY LEGS!!!! Ö”

Let’s zoom in on that.

Hmm, let’s zoom in a bit more:

Better. Or not really, this is quite messy. I should really see a hair dresser.

Can I ask you, my dear reader, why are you so afraid of this? You to have hair all over your body. It just happens that I have 7 limbs instead of 4. Is that such a big deal? Now you think about it, you shouldn’t be scared of my legs.

So, let’s move on to the next part: My body.

There isn’t much to say about my body. Just like my other roomie, Louis (a dwarf poodle), it’s hairy. Most people would stroke him, but kill me. Can you tell me why? No? Ok, good. That means you’re changing your perception of me. One last thing that might freak you out is my head. Let’s zoom in on that:

As I told you before, I have 8 eyes. It would be cool if humans also had them. This way, they could see the world in a broader perspective (just like I do). Just below my eyes, I have 2 chelicera. Let’s call them teeth. I use them to catch small insects. I don’t use them to bite you. Even if I would want to, I wouldn’t be able to penetrate your skin.

And last but not least, you see these two body parts that are out of focus. They’re called palps and can be used to sense my immediate environment, hold on to my prey and mate. You see: all my body parts have a meaningful function and are not meant to hurt or scare humans.

Oh yeah, one thing I still don’t get is how people can be afraid of me and my homies. We’re soooo small compared to you! I’m the biggest species living in Belgium and I’m still smaller than a pingpong ball. I’m not afraid of an ant, so why would you be afraid of me?

I think it’s time to drop some words from the Quora definition of a spider: “They’re silently creepy, wall-crawling, web-spinning, abundant egg-laying, hell-spawn creatures on Earth.”

I hope our (one sided, as we can’t do much) war can end here. May we live in harmony from now on. To thank you, I will keep your nights mosquito-free, your food fly-free and your sangria wasp-free.

To conclude my manifesto, I would like to show my favourite photo of the shoot with Maxim. I think it truly shows my beauty and elegance.


About the author: Charlie is a house spider. The opinions expressed in this article are solely those of the author. The photos of Charlie are by Maxim Piessen, a self taught macro- and travel photographer and founder of the new photography platform Photrea. Maxim started keeping exotic insects at the age of 10. You can find mor eof his work on his website and Instagram. This article was also published here.


Source: PetaPixel

A Message from a Spider to Arachnophobes

Kodak’s New Digitizing Box is a Simple Way to Bulk Digitize Film and Prints

Kodak’s New Digitizing Box is a Simple Way to Bulk Digitize Film and Prints

Kodak has announced a new service called the Kodak Digitizing Box. It’s designed to help people digitize large collections of old family memories with minimal hassle.

“The KODAK Digitizing Box brings a modern version of Kodak’s yellow envelope back to customer door steps and aims to make the daunting task of digitizing aging media easy,” Kodak says.

To get started, a customer requests one of four box sizes: 3, 10, 20, and 40 piece boxes.

Each piece can be a film roll, an audio tape, or a set of 25 photos. A wide range of media formats can be converted.

Once the box arrives, the customer places all the old photos and analog memories they’d like converted inside the box.

The pre-paid, pre-addressed box is then shipped back to the service.

After every item in the box is professionally digitized over about 5 to 6 weeks, the customer is then sent DVDs, a USB drive, or digital downloads of the files (along with the original items that were sent).

To give customers peace of mind, the box is tracked at every step of the process and 12 email updates are provided along the way.

Kodak Digitizing Box is actually a rebranded version of an existing service called Legacybox, except there are significantly lower prices. While Legacybox charges $88 for a 3 piece box and $1,100 for a 40 piece box, Kodak Digitizing Box is currently priced at $60 for a 3 piece and $560 for a 40 piece.

To learn more or get started with your own box, check out the Kodak Digitizing Box website.

(via Kodak Digitizing Box via Photography Blog)


Source: PetaPixel

Kodak’s New Digitizing Box is a Simple Way to Bulk Digitize Film and Prints