About Chris Hunt

http://www.chrishunt.com

Chris Hunt is a fashion and advertising photographer, based in New York, Los Angeles and Mexico City. Originally from California, he has spent the last 15 years living and working in Europe, Asia, Latin America, Moscow and across the United States. Beginning his career as a photojournalist, Chris then moved into fashion photography after working as a model agent for several years in L.A. He has recently broadened his portfolio into film, directing TV commercials for fashion and lifestyle brands. Chris balances outstanding creative talent with an impressive level of technical expertise, delivering impeccable professionalism and work of the highest quality with a relaxed and friendly attitude. On the rare moments he is not in his studio, Chris can be found pedaling his road bike through Italy, SCUBA diving in the South Pacific or riding a motocross bike in the mountains of California. His advertising clients include Google, TELCEL, Mitsubishi Automobiles, Pond's, Samsung, GNC, Chevrolet, Knorr and Garnier. He also works for fashion and beauty clients such as BCBG Max Azria, Herve Leger, Forever 21, bebe, ALDO, Nine West, Macy's, GAP, Banana Republic, Wet Seal, Arden B., Jockey International, Avon, Liverpool, Skechers, Fox Girls, Billabong, Stila Cosmetics and C&A. His work has been published in international magazines including VOGUE, Marie Claire, Cosmopolitan, Seventeen, Interview, Maxim, Surface, Men's Health, Nylon and InStyle. High profile clients include sports stars Maria Sharapova and Wayne Gretzky and rappers Ludacris, Ice Cube and 50 Cent.

Posts by Chris Hunt:

Don’t Be This Kind of Wildlife Photographer

Don’t Be This Kind of Wildlife Photographer

Wildlife photography in Yellowstone National Park is an incredible opportunity, yet some bad photographers are giving all photographers a bad name by not following the rules. I won’t even get into the plain rudeness of too many “professionals” that further that bad name.

The rules for wildlife viewing in Yellowstone are very simple. You’re required to stay 100 yards away from bears and wolves, and 25 yards away from everything else. If an animal approaches within that distance, you’re supposed to back up or leave. If an animal is outside that distance and changes its behavior because of you, you’re still too close. The ONLY exceptions are when a park ranger is on scene and allows the group to approach closer, or you’re driving by animals in your car.

Too many “photographers” visiting Yellowstone just don’t seem to get it, many of those calling themselves professionals. Even worse, more than a few obviously desperate photographers go as far as purposely harassing wildlife for a photo op.

Although I’m sure many disagree, I see nature photography as photographing nature completely undisturbed. Anything that causes an animal to change its natural behavior is pushing the lines of harassment. Accidentally disturbing an animal is just that – an accident, as long as you remove yourself from the incident. Purposely whistling at, clapping at, chasing or baiting an animal to get your selfish shot is unquestionably unprofessional. You don’t need an animal to look into your camera. You don’t need to be close enough for a full frame head shot with your 300mm lens.

One day this fall, I watched what started as a few people photographing the bull elk on the Madison River quickly escalate into a dangerous scene because of the “monkey-see-monkey-do” syndrome. The four people above appear to be photographing legally, but even the legal 25 yard distance is not safe when a testosterone-filled bull elk is running around.

When a bull elk is bugling directly at you, it’s time to move. Take notice of the man carrying a young child to get his cell phone photo below. A few photographers made it seem okay for everyone else to get as close as they wanted to a dangerous animal.

A closer crop of the photo above showing the father and child.

Even when the bull became very aggressive towards the crowd and was hurrying to gather his cows, a couple of mindless photographers still remained. If a park ranger had been there (I never saw one), he/she would have had a fit.

I’ve driven over 12,000 miles through Yellowstone this year alone, so I’ve seen just about everything short of an actual animal attack. I’ve watched photographers with large lenses chase elk, coyote, fox, bison, and even bears. I’ve seen people with cell phones attempting to get the same photo as the professionals, requiring them to get even closer.

If you see a photographer harassing wildlife, you can try to speak up and get them to leave. If you’re lucky, they’ll know they’ve been caught and move on. If you’re not (usually the case), you’ll get an earful and nothing good will happen. It’s hardly worth trying to intervene, unless they’re disturbing animals you were already photographing.

Very seldom is a park ranger going to be in right place at the right time to be able to see someone violating the wildlife laws. If you feel so inclined, you can film the illegal activity, making sure to get undeniable proof including their license plate. Turn it into a ranger or visitor center, and the NPS will take the appropriate action.

If you’re so desperate to “get the shot” that you have to chase an animal around, please do all photographers a favor and stay home.


About the author: Trent Sizemore is a wildlife photographer, instructor, and tour guide living in West Yellowstone, Montana, just outside Yellowstone Natoinal Park. The opinions in this article are solely those of the author. He has been working and teaching photography as art since 2011, and has had his work published internationally both online and in print. You can find more of Sizemore’s work and writing on his website, Facebook, and Instagram. This article was also published here.


Source: PetaPixel

Don’t Be This Kind of Wildlife Photographer

Shutterstock’s Composition Aware AI Photo Search Uses Deep Learning

Shutterstock’s Composition Aware AI Photo Search Uses Deep Learning

The stock photo service Shutterstock has announced a new powerful photo search tool called Composition Aware Search. It uses advanced deep learning technology to let you search for photos containing certain objects in certain locations.

After typing in one or more search terms for the objects you’d like in the frame, you can specify where in the photo you’d like those objects to appear. Everything is done in a small “layout” box that has circles representing the objects you’re searching for. Move the circles around in the box, and the search automatically updates with new results that better match your layout.

For example, if you’d like to find photos of wine in the upper right corner of the frame, some cheese below it, and some empty space on the left, you can now easily do that.

Here’s a short video showing how the new Composition Aware search works:

“This patent-pending tool uses a combination of machine vision, natural language processing, and state of the art information retrieval techniques to find strong matches against complex spatially aware search criteria,” Shutterstock says.

You can read the company’s white paper about this technology here, and you can try it out for yourself here.

(via Shutterstock via Engadget)


Source: PetaPixel

Shutterstock’s Composition Aware AI Photo Search Uses Deep Learning

This Guy Built a Giant Leica Camera Out of LEGO

This Guy Built a Giant Leica Camera Out of LEGO

Danish designer Milan Madge recently built himself a gigantic Leica III rangefinder camera out of LEGO blocks. The level of detail is impressive.

Here’s a photo of what the Leica IIIa looks like in real life:

The Leica IIIa. Photo © Kameraprojekt Graz 2015 / Wikimedia Commons / CC BY-SA 4.0.

“I’ve always loved the Barnack screw mount Leicas,” Madge tells PetaPixel. “I own a couple of Leica IIIs, they are my go-to cameras for most things.”

A few years ago, Madge made a 1:1 scale model of a Leica III as a joke, but he wasn’t happy with the level of detail. More recently he and some friends began building giant LEGO models of everyday objects, so he decided to revisit his Leica build.

“It seemed natural that the next thing I should build is a massive Leica,” Madge says.

“Cameras are a pretty interesting thing to build in LEGO,” Madge continues. “They are mainly lots of concentric circles, and LEGO bricks are anything but that. So it’s a great challenge, there’s a fair bit of maths involved.

“The hardest part for sure was the lens. Matching the radii and getting the LEGO bricks to line up whilst still staying in the LEGO System and making the thing strong enough to be handled was tough.”

“I thought the most important thing in this model was to ensure that there were no LEGO studs in the lens, that’s what dictated the scale, the element used there,” Madge says. “The part I’m not so happy about is that changing lenses doesn’t work perfectly at the moment. I’m working on a few solutions to make the screw mount.”

With this Leica III build out of the way, Madge has already started working on his next enormous LEGO camera model. You can follow along with his builds on Flickr.

(via Milan CMadge via Leica Rumors)


Source: PetaPixel

This Guy Built a Giant Leica Camera Out of LEGO

This Guy Sliced Off the Viewfinder of His Sony Full Frame Camera

This Guy Sliced Off the Viewfinder of His Sony Full Frame Camera

Here’s one of the more unusual camera modifications we’ve seen: a Chinese photographer over in the Xitek forums posted photos showing how he removed the electronic viewfinder from his Sony a7 full frame mirrorless camera. As you can see, his camera now looks more like a Sony a6500.

The guy, who goes by the name 麦大爷, writes that the viewfinder of the a7 has mixed reviews from photographers and that he decided to express his opinion about it “with action.” It appears he’s not a very big fan.

For his custom modification, he removed the top plate and EVF, carefully sliced off the viewfinder portion, and then fashioned a new plate segment to neatly cover over the gaping holes that remained.

Looking at the resulting camera, most people probably wouldn’t be able to tell such a drastic change had been made.

The camera now offers full-frame photography in a pint-sized body.

You can find more photos of the modding process in the discussion thread on Xitek.

(via Xitek via sonyalpharumors)


Source: PetaPixel

This Guy Sliced Off the Viewfinder of His Sony Full Frame Camera

A Drone Photo of Trees Knocked Down After a Storm

A Drone Photo of Trees Knocked Down After a Storm

Earlier this month, a storm named Xavier pounded Europe and caused extensive damage. A day after the storm, photographer Julian Stratenschulte took his camera drone out and captured this beautiful and slightly disorienting photo showing a row of trees that were knocked down, from a bird’s-eye view.

Stratenschulte, a staff photographer with German Press Agency dpa since 2009 and a drone operator since 2015, set out early that morning before sunrise to capture photos of the damage across Germany — trees had been uprooted across the northern part of the country.

“I drove around by car to find a good spot showing several trees next to each other,” Stratenschulte tells PetaPixel. “On a country lane I found three uprooted trees right next to the street. I thought to myself, ‘Well, maybe this would look interesting from a bird’s-eye view.’”

So Stratenschulte pulled out his DJI Phantom and captured a series of shots. He then edited the photos at the scene and sent them to his picture desk in Berlin. A short time later, the photo above began going viral on the Internet and Stratenschulte’s smartphone began buzzing nonstop with notifications about emails, social media messages, and calls.

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“So many people from all over the world were excited by the photo,” Stratenschulte says. “I was really surprised and didn’t expect that would happen. For me, the shot wasn’t anything more than a normal weather feature photo because I’ve known the scene and the optical illusion of the picture did not work for me.”

After the photo was featured on TV and in newspapers around the world, it came to light that not all of the trees in this country lane had been knocked over by the storm. Some of them had become seriously damaged, and a local farmer had used heavy machinery to bring the trees down, which is why the trees happened to be lying at perfect right angles to the street.

You can find more of Stratenschulte’s work on his website, Facebook, and Twitter.


Image credits: Photograph by Julian Stratenschulte / dpa Deutsche Presse-Agentur used with permission by dpa Picture-Alliance (www.picture-alliance.com/stroh.peter@picture-alliance.com)


Source: PetaPixel

A Drone Photo of Trees Knocked Down After a Storm

Samsung’s New Dual Pixel Sensor to Help Spread ‘Portrait Mode’

Samsung’s New Dual Pixel Sensor to Help Spread ‘Portrait Mode’

First launched in the iPhone 7 Plus, Apple’s ‘Portrait Mode’ uses depth data from dual rear cameras to generate faux blur for a shallow depth-of-field effect. Google’s new Pixel 2 has a similar mode that’s done with a single “dual pixel” sensor. Now Samsung has unveiled a new “dual pixel” sensor that may bring this tech to an even wider audience.

Samsung’s new ISOCELL Fast 2L9 is a 12-megapixel sensor that features “Dual Pixel” technology. What this means is that each “pixel” on the sensor actually consists of 2 separate photodiodes instead of one.

The first benefit of having dual pixels is autofocus speed. Each of the 12 million dual pixels on the sensor can do focus detection, allowing smartphones using the sensor to quickly lock onto small still objects and track moving subjects.

Samsung first unveiled its Dual Pixel smartphone sensor technology last year with a sensor packing 1.4μm pixels. This new sensor builds upon that design with smaller 1.28μm pixels, allowing for bump-less smartphone camera designs.

What’s also different this year is that Samsung is touting its new Dual Pixel sensors as a way to enable a single-module Portrait Mode in smartphones.

“Dual Pixel technology especially allows depth-of-field effect for taking bokeh, or aesthetically out-of-focused photographs, through a traditional single lens camera,” Samsung says.

The benefit of doing Portrait Mode using a single camera module and sensor is that it allows the mode to be used for front-facing cameras, which are often used for selfies that could benefit from the mode.

Here’s a look at Portrait Model in the new Google Pixel 2:

Samsung’s ISOCELL sensors are marketed in 4 different flavors, each focusing on one particular strength in photography: Fast, Slim, Bright, and Dual.

No word yet on when we’ll be seeing the new ISOCELL Fast 2L9 in the wild and which phones it may appear in.


Source: PetaPixel

Samsung’s New Dual Pixel Sensor to Help Spread ‘Portrait Mode’

ERDEM x H&M is Almost Here

ERDEM x H&M is Almost Here
Joining the illustrious list of designers who have collaborated with H&M this year is ERDEM, whose collection with the fast-fashion brand drops this November 2: and now, we finally have a first look at the collection. The designer brought on legendary filmmaker Baz Luhrmann to tease the collection, with a full film to follow.
Known for his exquisitely romantic garments and beautiful florals, which permeate this collection, the Canadian-Turkish designer is also branching out into menswear …

Keep on reading: ERDEM x H&M is Almost Here
Source: V Magazine

ERDEM x H&M is Almost Here

V Edit: Logomania

V Edit: Logomania
Just when you thought logomania was reaching its peak, a new crop of your favorite designers have been steadily churning out their own iterations—giving the graphic trend a new lease of life and proving the fashion fad still has had a lasting impact since it’s initial debut in V7’s Fall 2000 cover issue. While Chanel may have set the precedent by defining their signature interlocking C’s logo, the next wave of street-savvy designers are taking it one step further.
From Off-White’s hard-to…

Keep on reading: V Edit: Logomania
Source: V Magazine

V Edit: Logomania

Metabones Devil’s Speed Booster Can Give Your Pentax Q an f/0.666 Lens

Metabones Devil’s Speed Booster Can Give Your Pentax Q an f/0.666 Lens

Metabones creates a whole host of lens adaptors and Speed Boosters that reduce focal lengths and boost effective apertures of lenses. Now they’ve created a new Devil’s Speed Booster Q666 0.50x for Pentax Q cameras that will turn them into “low light monsters.”

The new speed booster allows you to mount any Nikon F or G mount lenses onto your Pentax Q camera (excluding the Nikon 2.1cm f/4 and 20mm f/2.8 AI-S lenses). Not only that but, if you attach a f/1.2 lens, you’ll end up with a “world-record” f/0.666 equivalent lens to play with (hence the “Devil” in the name). Combined with the back-illuminated sensor of the Pentax Q, that is one good low-light performing setup right there.

The booster is designed with 6 elements in 4 groups and “provides excellent sharpness, even at f/0.666” and only experiences fall-off near the corners.

It will give a magnification of 0.5x and produce a crop factor of 2.8x for Q and Q10 cameras, or a crop of 2.3x for Q7 and Q-S1 cameras. Distortion is extremely low (a maximum of 0.666%) and vignetting is also minimal. It’ll reduce the focal length of your lens by 10.1mm.

The mount provides manual aperture control but is not able to support electronic control. There’s a “long-throw clickless aperture ring” with an 8-stop range that will indicate the number of f-stops.

The Metabones Speed Booster Q666 is available for $490 on the Metabones website.

(via Metabones via DPReview)


Source: PetaPixel

Metabones Devil’s Speed Booster Can Give Your Pentax Q an f/0.666 Lens

A Before and After Look at the Magic of a Photoshop Artist

A Before and After Look at the Magic of a Photoshop Artist

Photographer and visual artist Antti Karppinen has been reimagining photos using Photoshop for over 23 years now. Here’s a before-and-after look at how Karppinen is able to take plain portraits (shot in studios, garages, and outdoors) and turn them into dreamlike images.

A Desert Road

A Rainy Alleyway

Fire in a Rowboat

Jack Sparrow Riding a Turtle

Bazooka in Warzone

The Last Clean Air

A Stormy Relationship

A Warrior from an Action Figure

Assassin at the Gate

A Surreal Seascape

“I have been using a motto ‘imagine anything’ to describe my work since I’m able to create pretty much anything I see in my mind or whatever I need to create,” Karppinen says. “Photography is always the starting point so I feel that I’m definitely also a photographer, but then the creative retoucher kicks in and I’m able to turn those images into something else.”

You can find more of Karppinen’s work on his website and Instagram.


Source: PetaPixel

A Before and After Look at the Magic of a Photoshop Artist