About Chris Hunt

http://www.chrishunt.com

Chris Hunt is a fashion and advertising photographer, based in New York, Los Angeles and Mexico City. Originally from California, he has spent the last 15 years living and working in Europe, Asia, Latin America, Moscow and across the United States. Beginning his career as a photojournalist, Chris then moved into fashion photography after working as a model agent for several years in L.A. He has recently broadened his portfolio into film, directing TV commercials for fashion and lifestyle brands. Chris balances outstanding creative talent with an impressive level of technical expertise, delivering impeccable professionalism and work of the highest quality with a relaxed and friendly attitude. On the rare moments he is not in his studio, Chris can be found pedaling his road bike through Italy, SCUBA diving in the South Pacific or riding a motocross bike in the mountains of California. His advertising clients include Google, TELCEL, Mitsubishi Automobiles, Pond's, Samsung, GNC, Chevrolet, Knorr and Garnier. He also works for fashion and beauty clients such as BCBG Max Azria, Herve Leger, Forever 21, bebe, ALDO, Nine West, Macy's, GAP, Banana Republic, Wet Seal, Arden B., Jockey International, Avon, Liverpool, Skechers, Fox Girls, Billabong, Stila Cosmetics and C&A. His work has been published in international magazines including VOGUE, Marie Claire, Cosmopolitan, Seventeen, Interview, Maxim, Surface, Men's Health, Nylon and InStyle. High profile clients include sports stars Maria Sharapova and Wayne Gretzky and rappers Ludacris, Ice Cube and 50 Cent.

Posts by Chris Hunt:

Huawei P30 Pro is an ISO 409600 Low-Light Monster

Huawei P30 Pro is an ISO 409600 Low-Light Monster

Huawei has just announced its new P30 and P30 Pro flagship smartphones, and one of the biggest things Huawei focused on was smartphone quality. Both phones are low-light monsters, and the P30 Pro has a sensitivity that goes up to a staggering ISO 409600.

The back of the P30 Pro features a quad-camera setup with a 20MP 16mm f/2.2 ultra-wide camera, a 40MP 27mm f/1.6 OIS main camera, an 8MP 125mm f/3.4 OIS telephoto camera, and a time-of-flight (TOF) camera for depth sensing. The camera system uses a periscope design to provide 10x of near-lossless zoom. On the front of the phone is a 32MP selfie camera.

At its highly-anticipated unveiling event in Paris today, Huawei spent a considerable amount of time boasting that the P30 Pro has the highest light sensitivity found on the market today.

Huawei notes that while the P20 Pro unveiled in 2018 has a max ISO of 102400 that matches the Canon 5D Mark IV in sensitivity, the P30 Pro blows both of those devices out of the water with ISO 409600.

“It’s unbelievable,” says Huawei business group CEO Richard Yu, who says that the phone is able to capture photos in near darkness with just 1 lux of illumination — by comparison, DxOMark’s low light test only takes cameras down to 5 lux. Huawei says its 1/1.7-inch SuperSensing RYYB sensor that uses yellow instead of green can collect 40% more light than traditional RGB sensors.

At 1 lux, while the iPhone XS MAX and Samsung Galaxy S10+ both capture black frames and when the human eye can’t see anything, the P30 Pro can capture bright, vivid colors.

Yu says the P30 Pro can shoot photos of the starry night sky with a single non-long-exposure shot, showing an example of a f/1.6, 0.85s, ISO 102400 photo:

And the low-light capabilities are useful for parents who wish to capture precious moments of their kids at night — during bedtime, for example:

Turn on Handheld Night Mode, and you can shoot photos of auroras without a tripod:

And in Long Exposure mode, even more creative possibilities are opened up:

Huawei has earned a bad reputation of using misleading photos in its marketing again and again, but DxOMark tested the smartphone and gave it a best-ever overall score of 112.

“The zoom on its own will make the new Huawei an extremely tempting option for many mobile photographers, but the camera performs very well in almost all other areas as well,” DxOMark writes in its review. “The bokeh mode is the best we have seen; image detail and noise levels are excellent across all light levels; and the camera records high-quality footage in video mode.

“There is still some room for improvement in terms of color and artifacts, but these are relatively minor shortcomings that most users will be able to easily live with. [T]he P30 Pro is easily the most versatile mobile imaging tool to date, allowing you to cover a wider range of photographic situations than any other smartphone.”

Other photography features include a 50x digital zoom (that combines OIS and AI), an LED flash, and HDR.

On the video front, the P30 Pro can shoot 2160p at 30fps, 1080p at 60fps, and 720p at 960fps.

Other non-imaging features and specs of the P30 Pro include a 6.47-inch AMOLED display with a resolution of 2,340×1,080, Android 9.0 Pie, 128GB/256GB/512GB storage, a Kirin 980 processor, 8GB RAM, Bluetooth 5.0, USB-C, an in-display fingerprint sensor, IP68 water resistance, and a 4,200mAh battery.

The Huawei P30 Pro is available today over in Europe (in blue, white, amber, aurora, and black) and costs €999 (~$1,127) for 128GB of storage, €1,099 (~$1,240) for 256GB, and €1,249 (~$1,409) for 512GB.


Source: PetaPixel

Huawei P30 Pro is an ISO 409600 Low-Light Monster

Techno Queen, Nicole Moudaber at SXM Festival: A VMag Exclusive

Techno Queen, Nicole Moudaber at SXM Festival: A VMag Exclusive
Nicole Moudaber, “La Reina de Techno,” is one of the headliners at the SXM festival in Sint Marteen – a bifurcated but very much bipartisan Dutch and French territory where the motto is “be nice” and everyone chimes in with the national joke, “that will be x-dollars,” followed by a chuckle and “just kidding.” Who isn’t kidding? The reigning queen – she isn’t kidding when she says she doesn’t care for the label, “female DJ,” or fellow house, techno, and dance music…

Keep on reading: Techno Queen, Nicole Moudaber at SXM Festival: A VMag Exclusive
Source: V Magazine

Techno Queen, Nicole Moudaber at SXM Festival: A VMag Exclusive

‘Tonight Show’ Shot an Entire Episode on the Samsung Galaxy S10+

‘Tonight Show’ Shot an Entire Episode on the Samsung Galaxy S10+

Smartphone camera quality continues to hit new heights, and here’s another example of how far we’ve come: NBC will air an episode of “The Tonight Show” shot entirely on the Samsung Galaxy S10+.

Variety reports that tonight’s episode will be an unusual one that diverges from the show’s standard recipe of an opening monologue and sit-down with guests.

Host Jimmy Fallon will reportedly open the episode by informing viewers that it was shot entirely with the smartphone, and the episode will go on to feature some of Fallon’s favorite spots in New York:

“Tonight” viewers will see Fallon, announcer Steve Higgins and house band The Roots dining at Rao’s; Fallon delivering meatballs to New York firefighters; and Fallon and The Roots visit New York jazz club The Django. Fallon will sing with Conor McGregor at New York Irish pub. He will also interview Michael Che at the Comedy Cellar and show comic Rachel Feinstein performing a set there. Fallon and The Roots will also be spotted crooning doo-wop against a New York City backdrop.

As you’ve probably guessed, it’s part of a big marketing effort and an advertising deal that NBCUniversal signed with Samsung.

The $1,000 Samsung Galaxy S10+ was announced in February, and it features a 6.4-inch screen, dual cameras on the front, and a triple camera system on the back.

(via Variety via Engadget)


Source: PetaPixel

‘Tonight Show’ Shot an Entire Episode on the Samsung Galaxy S10+

GuruShots Raises $5M for Its Crowd-Based Photo Game

GuruShots Raises M for Its Crowd-Based Photo Game

The Tel Aviv, Israel-based startup GuruShots has raised $5 million in Series A funding for its crowd-based real-world photography game, which gamifies photography for enthusiasts around the world.

The funding, led by Altair Capital, Buran Venture Capital, and Ervington Investments Limited, brings GuruShots’ total funding to $6.5 million and will help the company accelerate its growth.

GuruShots is designed to turn photography into a fun, interactive, global online competition through the Web and mobile devices.

Users can submit photos to daily themed challenges (e.g. “Black and White” and “Beards”) and have their work rated through crowdsourced voting. The highest ranked photos are surfaced, and users receive real-time feedback.

Winners of these mini competitions can win prizes, from in-game power-ups to photography gear to gift cards to spots in international photo exhibitions.

GuruShots hots five photo exhibitions each month around the world.

Since launching back in 2015, GuruShots how boasts over 4 billion votes per month across over 500 challenges, and over $600,000 in prizes has been awarded. About 5,000 members are recognized for their achievements each month, and tens of thousands of photos have already been exhibited.

“GuruShots, one of the world’s largest image ranking platforms using UGC [user-generated content], is easy and fun enough for anyone to start, and challenging enough for everyone to get hooked,” GuruShots says. “As users level up in the game, they find themselves improving their photo-taking skills, too.”

If you’d like to give GuruShots a shot, you can participate through the website and by downloading the app through the iTunes App Store and Google Play.


Source: PetaPixel

GuruShots Raises M for Its Crowd-Based Photo Game

Wet Plate Collodion Passport Photos with a Polaroid Miniportrait Camera

Wet Plate Collodion Passport Photos with a Polaroid Miniportrait Camera

Passport photos on wet plate collodion aren’t legally compliant, but you’re guaranteed to have fun making them. I shot wet plate collodion passport photos using a Polaroid Miniportrait camera.

The funny thing about this camera is that it has fixed-focus lenses. You have to sit 1.2 meters (3.94 feet) away. To be sure you are sitting at the right spot, there is a tape measure integrated into the Polaroid camera. You can see a little metal thingy underneath the lens without the lens cap on.

The f/8 lenses of the Polaroid Miniportrait camera combined with a photosensitivity of about ISO 0.5 of the wet plate were a bigger challenge than expected.

The full power of the Hensel Tria 6000 generator with the Grand Mini 85 was just enough to ensure a correct exposure. For lots of people, it sounds shocking since 6000 watts doesn’t seem to be nearly enough, but when you do the math it makes sense. ISO 0.5, f/8, and a softbox.

My Sekonic light meter showed aperture 18 at ISO 3 (unfortunately you can not set a smaller value). So that’s 2 1/3 stops more than f/8, which brings me to about 0.5.

To hold the wet plate better in position, I used the empty plastic box of the Fuji FP-100C film. A fellow wet plater, Jim Kost, told me he did it a similar way. I used the original plastic box and used the foam that is already in that box to hold the wet plate in position.

Then I put the Fuji plastic box with the wet plate inside into the film holder. It’s very easy to do, and the whole project was finished in 90 minutes.

Fortunately, in the closet is a Hensel Tria 3000, so the next passport photo should be more creative.


About the author: Markus Hofstaetter is a photographer who enjoys life and meeting people around the world. You can connect with him and find more of his work on his website, blog, Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram. This article was also published here.


Source: PetaPixel

Wet Plate Collodion Passport Photos with a Polaroid Miniportrait Camera

Process: A Short Film About a Large Format Photographer

Process: A Short Film About a Large Format Photographer

“Process” is a 3-minute short film by director Will Campbell that looks into the mind of a large format photographer.

“It’s a stylish, sensorial exploration into the process and motivation of a large format photographer,” Campbell tells PetaPixel. “The modern digital camera allows us to easily shoot hundreds of frames, edit them, and upload our favorites to the internet within minutes. This is a very different experience to that of the large format photographer.

“For them the process is arduous, analog, and anything but instant. So what pushes large format photographers on? Scott Folsom is a deep well of wisdom and knowledge when it comes to analog photography, large format, and development processes. This film answers the question of why some people would rather have it slow.”


Source: PetaPixel

Process: A Short Film About a Large Format Photographer

GCDS Drops Streetwear For Dogs

GCDS Drops Streetwear For Dogs
Edgy streetwear is going to the dogs. Teaming up with V.I.P (Very Important Puppies), Italian brand GCDS has released a streetwear-inflected collection for canines. While keeping with core brand values re: graphic apparel and accessories, the collection is tailored to various dog sizes and gaits, keeping your four-legged friend’s comfort in mind. And while he or she may be colorblind and illiterate, the pink palette and catchy phrases like “J’Adore GCDS” add human-friendly touches. Perhaps best…

Keep on reading: GCDS Drops Streetwear For Dogs
Source: V Magazine

GCDS Drops Streetwear For Dogs

This is How Photorealistic Video Game Engines Are Now

This is How Photorealistic Video Game Engines Are Now

The asset library Quixel has released this new 2.5-minute cinematic short film titled “Rebirth.” It’s an eye-opening look at how photorealistic real-time rendering in video game engines is now.

To prepare for the project, Quixel spent a month in cold and wet locations in Iceland, scanning all kinds of objects found in the natural environment using. The team returned with over 1,000 scans that captured the details of the landscape.

Examples of Quixel photogrammetry scans. Screenshots by TechSpot.

Using the scans — a part of Quixel’s Megascans library — a team of three artists at Quixel created the 1:45 cinematic film in real-time using the power of the Unreal Engine 4 game engine.

“The high fidelity of the physically-based scans delivers results that are remarkably photorealistic,” Unreal Engine writes.

Here are some still frames from the short film:

Part of the realism was due to the use of a physical camera rig that allowed the creators to “film” in virtual reality.

“With UE 4.21 at the heart of the real-time pipeline, Quixel’s artists were able to iterate on the go, eliminating the need for previsualization or post-production,” Unreal says. “The team also built a physical camera rig that was able to capture movements in-engine using virtual reality, adding an enhanced dimension of realism to the short. All post-processing and color grading was completed directly within Unreal.”

The result of all this work and technology is a real-time film that rivals the photorealism of offline renders.

(via Unreal Engine via DPReview)


Source: PetaPixel

This is How Photorealistic Video Game Engines Are Now

5 Quick Headshot Tips in 3 Minutes by Photographer Peter Hurley

5 Quick Headshot Tips in 3 Minutes by Photographer Peter Hurley

Want to up your portrait game? Here’s a video by B&H in which Naew York City-based portrait photographer Peter Hurley shares 5 headshot tips in about 3 minutes.

Here’s a rundown of the tips covered:

1. Keep it Simple

2. Keep a Consistent Portfolio

3. Get the Jawline Out

4. It’s All About the Squinch

5. Confidence and Approachability

Watch the video at the top for Hurley’s explanation of each of these tips and how they can result in better headshots for your business.


Source: PetaPixel

5 Quick Headshot Tips in 3 Minutes by Photographer Peter Hurley

Class of 2019: IMG Models

Class of 2019: IMG Models
This spread appears in the pages of V118 our Spring I issue!
They say fashion is like high school. This model-off (dress code: SS19) puts theory into practice. In V118, 7 IMG fierce faces Lily, Eliseu, Akiima, Nana, Mads, Noah, and Valentine redefine tailoring while striking a “power suiting” pose.

Keep on reading: Class of 2019: IMG Models
Source: V Magazine

Class of 2019: IMG Models