About Chris Hunt

http://www.chrishunt.com

Chris Hunt is a fashion and advertising photographer, based in New York, Los Angeles and Mexico City. Originally from California, he has spent the last 15 years living and working in Europe, Asia, Latin America, Moscow and across the United States. Beginning his career as a photojournalist, Chris then moved into fashion photography after working as a model agent for several years in L.A. He has recently broadened his portfolio into film, directing TV commercials for fashion and lifestyle brands. Chris balances outstanding creative talent with an impressive level of technical expertise, delivering impeccable professionalism and work of the highest quality with a relaxed and friendly attitude. On the rare moments he is not in his studio, Chris can be found pedaling his road bike through Italy, SCUBA diving in the South Pacific or riding a motocross bike in the mountains of California. His advertising clients include Google, TELCEL, Mitsubishi Automobiles, Pond's, Samsung, GNC, Chevrolet, Knorr and Garnier. He also works for fashion and beauty clients such as BCBG Max Azria, Herve Leger, Forever 21, bebe, ALDO, Nine West, Macy's, GAP, Banana Republic, Wet Seal, Arden B., Jockey International, Avon, Liverpool, Skechers, Fox Girls, Billabong, Stila Cosmetics and C&A. His work has been published in international magazines including VOGUE, Marie Claire, Cosmopolitan, Seventeen, Interview, Maxim, Surface, Men's Health, Nylon and InStyle. High profile clients include sports stars Maria Sharapova and Wayne Gretzky and rappers Ludacris, Ice Cube and 50 Cent.

Posts by Chris Hunt:

Photography Ads of Yore: Capitalist Pig

Photography Ads of Yore: Capitalist Pig

The first issue of PDN was published in 1980. It was a simpler time, when the world worried about nuclear annihilation, MTV was a year away from showing its first music video and Instagram’s founder had yet to be born.

To reconnect with our history and the history of our industry, we descended into the dusty catacombs of the PDN archives, brushed away the cobwebs* and found some of those early issues to bring you a look at what was considered cutting edge at the time. You can browse the growing collection of old photography ads here.

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This installment dates back to January, 1985, a time when photographers were evidently coming to terms with the fact that they were capitalists (but the good kind).

*In truth, most of our old issues are neatly arranged on a shelf in a brightly-lit conference room.

 

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The post Photography Ads of Yore: Capitalist Pig appeared first on PDNPulse.

Source: PDN Pulse

Photography Ads of Yore: Capitalist Pig

Court Refuses to Toss Lawsuit Between Monkey and Photographer

Court Refuses to Toss Lawsuit Between Monkey and Photographer

Photographer David Slater’s legal nightmare surrounding that monkey selfie snapped in 2011 isn’t over. A US court has decided not to toss the copyright lawsuit filed against Slater by PETA on the monkey’s behalf, despite Slater and PETA reaching a settlement last year.

Digital Trends reports that in an order filed last week, the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals denied Slater’s and PETA’s motion to dismiss the case.

Even if both parties in a lawsuit wish to have the case dismissed, it’s ultimately up to the court to grant or deny the request.

“The grant of a voluntary dismissal is not mandatory, and sometimes neither is it advisable,” the decision reads. “Our sister circuits have found a number of circumstances in which it is appropriate for the court to deny requests for voluntary dismissal and vacatur. We believe the rationale of those cases applies here.”

Basically, sometimes courts can decide that a legal battle should proceed in order to resolve issues that may again pop up in the future — the goal is to set a legal precedent for similar future cases to be guided by.

Slater’s case is certainly unusual in a number of ways. PETA originally sued Slater in 2015 on the monkey’s behalf to have the copyright to the selfie assigned to Naruto instead of Slater. The US Copyright Office stated in 2014 that it can’t assign copyrights to monkeys, and a judge ruled in 2016 that a monkey cannot own the copyright to photos.

Still, the case dragged on, eventually causing Slater to go broke due to the financial burden of fighting the bizarre battle in court.

In September 2017, Slater settled with PETA to have the case dropped, agreeing to donate 25% of all future profits from the photo to registered charities to protect the monkey.

But the court is now saying that it’s in the best interest of the US legal system to have this case come to a verdict.

“[T]his case has been fully briefed and argued by both sides, and the court has expended considerable resources to come to a resolution,” the decision states. “Denying the motion to dismiss ensures that ‘the investment of public resources already devoted to this litigation will have some return.”

The decision is also to prevent PETA from manipulating legal precedent in a way that suits its own interests.

“[D]enying the motion to dismiss and declining to vacate the lower court judgment prevents the parties from manipulating precedent in a way that suits their institutional preferences,” the court writes.


Source: PetaPixel

Court Refuses to Toss Lawsuit Between Monkey and Photographer

This Single Take in a Japanese School Was Shot with a Tiny Camera Drone

This Single Take in a Japanese School Was Shot with a Tiny Camera Drone

Want to see some impressive camera drone piloting? Check out this 1.5-minute video featuring the Japanese group Onnanocos. It was shot in one single, continuous take using a tiny drone that can squeeze through tight gaps.

Drone pilot Katsu FPV says the footage was shot with a 1.6-inch drone and the $80 RunCam Split Mini FPV camera, and that stabilization was applied in post.

(via Katsu FPV via Fstoppers)


Source: PetaPixel

This Single Take in a Japanese School Was Shot with a Tiny Camera Drone

Photos of Cattle Branding in Argentina

Photos of Cattle Branding in Argentina

20 years ago, photographer Marcos Furer decided to move away from his life as a newspaper and magazine journalist in Buenos Aires, Argentina, and to the slower lifestyle of the inner country. His personal work has since focused on the people and lifestyle Furer sees on a daily basis around him.

“Traditions. Landscapes. The people still live like they’re stopped in time,” Furer says. At a local estancia, the ranchers have an annual tradition of gathering all the new cows together for branding.

One of Furer’s photos of this branding showing a dog lunging at a cow was recently selected from among 300,000 entries as one of the 5 winning photos of HIPA, the Hamdan Bin Mohammed Bin Rashid Al Maktoum International Photography Award.

Here are more photos from the same series:

You can find more of Furer’s work on his website.


Source: PetaPixel

Photos of Cattle Branding in Argentina

Andrea Bruce Wins $20K 2018 Anja Niedringhaus Award

Andrea Bruce Wins K 2018 Anja Niedringhaus Award

Photographer Andrea Bruce has won the 2018 Anja Niedringhaus Courage in Photojournalism Award, the International Women’s Media Foundation (IWMF) announced on Saturday. The award comes with a $20,000 prize. Two other photographers—Amber Bracken and Rebecca Conway—won honorable mentions.

Chosen from 136 nominees, Bruce won for her work focusing on people living in the aftermath of war, particularly in Iraq and Afghanistan, the IWMF said in its announcement. “Andrea was selected for her empathy, her emotional connection with subject, and for the dignity that shines through in her portfolio, which also includes images from Syria, Russia, Bahrain, India and Haiti,” the IWMF said.

Bruce recently won a $30,000 Catchlight Fellowship for her current work about democracy in the U.S.

Bracken was recognized for her work documenting the 2016 protests initiated by the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe against the Dakota Access Pipeline. Conway, who is now a photo editor for Agence France-Presse, was recognized for her work documenting the conflict in Kashmir.

The Anja Niedringhaus Award recognizes women journalists who “document crucial stories in challenging environments,” the IWMF says. It was created to honor the life and work of Pulitzer Prize-winning photographer Anja Niedringhaus, who was killed in 2014 while covering elections in Afghanistan.

Related:
Andrea Bruce, Aida Muluneh, Carlos Javier Ortiz Win $30K Catchlight Fellowships

Sinclair Wins $20K 2017 Anja Niedringhaus Award

The post Andrea Bruce Wins $20K 2018 Anja Niedringhaus Award appeared first on PDNPulse.

Source: PDN Pulse

Andrea Bruce Wins K 2018 Anja Niedringhaus Award

MAC Cosmetics Takes Over the Nicopanda Runway Show

MAC Cosmetics Takes Over the Nicopanda Runway Show
MAC has proven themselves to have an eye for talent, having partnered countless times with creatives who don’t even directly work in the beauty industry. Past collaborators have included the likes of Lorde, Nicki Minaj, and even the masterminds over at Disney. As of last week, fashion powerhouse and V favorite Nicola Formichetti proved himself to be the makeup brand’s new best friend, launching an exclusive collaboration between them and his self-made fashion brand Nicopanda. The new line was…

Keep on reading: MAC Cosmetics Takes Over the Nicopanda Runway Show
Source: V Magazine

MAC Cosmetics Takes Over the Nicopanda Runway Show

Photos of Car Attack and Refugees Win 2018 Pulitzer Prizes

Photos of Car Attack and Refugees Win 2018 Pulitzer Prizes

The 2018 Pulitzer Prize winners have just been announced. Photographer Ryan Kelly of The Daily Progress in Charlottesville, Virginia, won the Breaking News Photography category for his chilling photo of the moment a car attack slammed into racially-charged protests in his town — an incident that made national headlines.

“A vehicle plows into a group of protesters marching along 4th Street NE at the Downtown Mall in Charlottesville on the day of the Unite the Right rally on Saturday, August 12, 2017,” the caption reads.

The photo “reflected the photographer’s reflexes and concentration,” the Pulitzer Board writes.

Poynter reports that the photo was actually captured on Kelly’s last day in the newsroom before leaving to run social media for a brewery and work as a freelance photographer.

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The prize for the Feature Photography category was awarded to the Photography Staff of Reuters for “shocking photographs that exposed the world to the violence Rohingya refugees faced in fleeing Myanmar” (you can view the full gallery here).

Reuters had originally entered the images in the Breaking News Photography category, but the Pulitzer Board made the decision to move the entry to the Feature Photography category.

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For their wins, Kelly and the Reuters photo staff each receive a $15,000 cash prize and a Pulitzer Prize certificate.


Image credits: Top photo by Ryan Kelly/The Daily Progress. Bottom photos by the Photography Staff of Reuters


Source: PetaPixel

Photos of Car Attack and Refugees Win 2018 Pulitzer Prizes

A Timelapse of the Fastest-Ever Climb of El Capitan in Yosemite

A Timelapse of the Fastest-Ever Climb of El Capitan in Yosemite

On October 2017, rock climbers Brad Gobright and Jim Reynolds broke the record for speed climbing The Nose on El Capitan in Yosemite by making it to the top in 2 hours, 19 minutes, and 44 seconds. Photographer Tristan Greszko witnessed the climb and made this beautiful 7-minute timelapse showing how it went down.

The Nose is a nearly-3,000-foot vertical route for El Capitan, a mountain that was once considered unclimbable. Since the first ascent in 1958, the record time for The Nose had gone from 17 hours and 45 minutes in 1975 to 2 hours, 23 minutes, and 46 seconds for the previous record set by Hans Florine and Alex Honnold in 2012.

Late last year, after 11 previous attempts, Gobright and Reynolds managed to break that standing speed record with their unbelievable time.

“Watching this as it happened was one of the more incredible spectacles I’ve ever witnessed,” Greszko writes. “[A]n amazing display of superhuman mastery unlike anything I’ve seen before…”


Source: PetaPixel

A Timelapse of the Fastest-Ever Climb of El Capitan in Yosemite

Flash vs. Natural Light: Two Pro Portrait Photographers Go Head-to-Head

Flash vs. Natural Light: Two Pro Portrait Photographers Go Head-to-Head

Portrait photographers Manny Ortiz and Jessica Kobeissi just did a shootout that pitted flash against natural light. The two each shot portraits of the same model in a studio, except Ortiz used an off-camera flash as his main light while Kobeissi only used the sunlight bouncing around in the space.

Here are the portraits that resulted for the different outfits chosen:

Outfit #1

Natural light photo by Jessica Kobeissi
Natural light photo by Jessica Kobeissi
Natural light photo by Jessica Kobeissi
Natural light photo by Jessica Kobeissi
Off-camera flash photo by Manny Ortiz
Off-camera flash photo by Manny Ortiz
Off-camera flash photo by Manny Ortiz

Outfit #2

Natural light photo by Jessica Kobeissi
Natural light photo by Jessica Kobeissi
Natural light photo by Jessica Kobeissi
Off-camera flash photo by Manny Ortiz
Off-camera flash photo by Manny Ortiz
Off-camera flash photo by Manny Ortiz
Off-camera flash photo by Manny Ortiz

Outfit #3

Natural light photo by Jessica Kobeissi
Natural light photo by Jessica Kobeissi
Off-camera flash photo by Manny Ortiz
Off-camera flash photo by Manny Ortiz

Kobeissi says that her only challenge was adjusting to the changing sunlight throughout the shoot. Ortiz says his challenge was being constrained in mobility by his lighting setup.


Which photos did you prefer from this shootout?


Source: PetaPixel

Flash vs. Natural Light: Two Pro Portrait Photographers Go Head-to-Head