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Ep. 291: Adobe Photoshop to Be More Mobile – and more

Ep. 291: Adobe Photoshop to Be More Mobile – and more



Episode 291 of the PetaPixel Photography Podcast.
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Featured: Nomadic landscape photographer, Mandy Lea

In This Episode

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Show Opener:
Nomadic landscape photographer, Mandy Lea opens the show. Thanks Mandy!

Sponsors:
– Get 20% off at PhottixUS.com with offer code PetaPixel20
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Stories:
Adobe’s mobile plan for Photoshop. (#)

Nikon’s upcoming smaller, lighter, less-expensive 500. (#)

Rumors of the sensor in Canon’s first mirrorless body. (#)

How Homeland Security wants the public to view photography . (#)

Future Nikon bodies and lenses might read you…and save lives. (#)

Blackmagic Design and Apple team up, but is their eGPU for you? (#)

Apple’s upgrades to its line of MacBook Pro laptops. (#)

Outtake

My other podcast with Brian Matiash, the No Name Photo Show.

Connect With Us

Thank you for listening to the PetaPixel Photography Podcast! Connect with me, Sharky James on TwitterInstagram and Facebook (all @LensShark) as we build this community.

We’d love to answer your question on the show. Leave us an audio question through our voicemail widget, comment below or via social media. But audio questions are awesome!

You can also cut a show opener for us to play on the show! As an example: “Hi, this is Matt Smith with Double Heart Photography in Chicago, Illinois, and you’re listening to the PetaPixel Photography Podcast with Sharky James!”


Source: PetaPixel

Ep. 291: Adobe Photoshop to Be More Mobile – and more

Guy Proposes to His Photographer Girlfriend with a Camera Tattoo

Guy Proposes to His Photographer Girlfriend with a Camera Tattoo

Charlene Trickey is a professional photographer based in Florida and the owner of Trickey Photography. When her boyfriend Travis Durham proposed to Charlene yesterday, he did it with a large tattoo on his thigh with a vintage camera and the words: “Can’t Picture Myself Without You. WYMM?”

Note: The videos below contain some strong language.

A box next to “WYMM” was left empty for Charlene to check if/when she accepted the proposal.

“Travis called me to come pick him up, and when I came in the [tattoo] shop he went to show me his “new tattoo” on his arm, but there was nothing there,” Charlene tells PetaPixel. “That’s when he reveals the actual tattoo. He gets down on one knee and asks. I say yes.”

Here’s a video of how the proposal went down:

After accepting Travis’ proposal, Charlene was then invited to check the box to complete the tattoo. Here’s a video of her inking the checkmark:

Now that’s a sign of true love for a photographer who has a true love for photography.


Image credits: Photograph and videos by Brandon of Old Glory Tattoo. Courtesy Charlene Trickey.


Source: PetaPixel

Guy Proposes to His Photographer Girlfriend with a Camera Tattoo

Metabones Degrades the Edge Image Quality of Wide-Angle Lenses

Metabones Degrades the Edge Image Quality of Wide-Angle Lenses

With the popularity of mirrorless cameras from Sony, Fuji, Panasonic among others, more and more Canon users are either changing systems or wanting to try these new cameras. That in turn, is making adapting lenses more popular than ever, especially as autofocus performance continues to improve and includes many native features like Continous Eye AF (in the case of Sony cameras).

While I was never a Canon DSLR owner, I have purchased Canon EF lenses before to use with my Sony camera because either there was no native option at the time or the Canon offering was superior in image quality for my needs.

My experience has been that results vary from great to terrible depending on the particular lens, camera body, and firmware being used.

But one question did remain after using adapters: do they affect image quality even though they do not have any glass elements?

While using the Metabones IV before, I did notice problems with image sharpness on the edges of my wide angle lenses, but I thought it was just a particular lens defect of my copy or the fact that it was not designed for the mirrorless sensor of my Sony cameras.

After getting the $399 Metabones V and $249 Sigma MC-11 adapter, I was using them with my different lenses randomly until I started noticing a pattern. While the Metabones was giving me results similar to IV, the MC-11 was always giving me much better sharpness across the frame from my wide lenses.

So, I decided to test this and also added a Canon 5D Mark IV for reference. I even added my Sony 12-24mm f/4 as well for another reference.

The lens being tested is the widest I could find in other to really put this theory to the test: the Canon EF 11-24mm f/4.

The main setup for this comparison: a Canon 11-24mm f/4L lens adapted for a Sony a7R III using a Metabones V and a Sigma MC-11.

For every adapter or lens, 10 photos were taken to make sure my results were consistent and not based on a few bad photos. You can also download the RAW files so you can inspect them on your end if you so desire.

Test #1

Sony FE 12-24mm on a Sony a7R III
Canon 11-24mm f/4L on a Sony a7R III using a Metabones V.
Canon 11-24mm f/4L on a Sony a7R III using a Sigma MC-11.

On these 100% left side crops you can clearly see how much more detailed the MC-11 sample looks:

100% left side crop. Sony FE 12-24mm on a Sony a7R III.
100% left side crop. Canon 11-24mm f/4L on a Sony a7R III using a Metabones V.
100% left side crop. Canon 11-24mm f/4L on a Sony a7R III using a Sigma MC-11.

The sign where it says Welcome to ED’s Place, for example, is a lot sharper with the MC-11 than with the Metabones.

Once again, remember that for every adapter or lens I took 10 photos not just 1, so what you are seeing here is not a single bad photo of the Metabones but the consistent results I got from it during the tests.

The FE 12-24mm does very nice on the left side too.

Here are 100% right side crops:

100% right side crop. Sony FE 12-24mm on a Sony a7R III.
100% right side crop. Canon 11-24mm f/4L on a Sony a7R III using a Metabones V.
100% right side crop. Canon 11-24mm f/4L on a Sony a7R III using a Sigma MC-11.

On the 100% right side crops once again you can see the superior sharpness offered by the MC-11 like on the power lines and post near the top right corner. The Metabones looks blurry and seems to be affected by vignetting as well.

My FE 12-24mm has a weak right side which you can see on the drop in sharpness compared to the left side test.

Test #2

For test 2, I decided to include the Canon 5D Mark IV as well for reference.

Canon 11-24mm f/4L on a Canon 5D Mark IV.
Sony FE 12-24mm on a Sony a7R III
Canon 11-24mm f/4L on a Sony a7R III using a Metabones V.
Canon 11-24mm f/4L on a Sony a7R III using a Sigma MC-11.

For comparing 100% crops of the left side of the frame, I reduced the size of the a7R III images to match the resolution of the Canon 5D IV. This makes the comparison between the MC-11 and Metabones look a bit closer in performance than it really was. Feel free to download the full-size photos so you can compare on your end as well.

100% left side crop. Canon 11-24mm f/4L on a Canon 5D Mark IV.
100% left side crop. Sony FE 12-24mm on a Sony a7R III
100% left side crop. Canon 11-24mm f/4L on a Sony a7R III using a Metabones V.
100% left side crop. Canon 11-24mm f/4L on a Sony a7R III using a Sigma MC-11.

You can see that the MC-11 shows the 45 parking sign with more detail than the Metabones. Also, the Bestway sign is sharper as well.

The FE 12-24mm does very well on this left side with great detail while the Canon image lacks detail in comparison to the others.

For the right side 100% crop samples, I did not resize the a7R III images to match the Canon.

100% right side crop. Canon 11-24mm f/4L on a Canon 5D Mark IV.
100% right side crop. Sony FE 12-24mm on a Sony a7R III
100% right side crop. Canon 11-24mm f/4L on a Sony a7R III using a Metabones V.
100% right side crop. Canon 11-24mm f/4L on a Sony a7R III using a Sigma MC-11.

Once again the weak right side of my FE 12-24mm shows in the blurry sign “Classic Cars”. The Canon 5D, as on the previous crop, lacks the details to compete with the other samples.

And like in all other previous comparisons, the MC-11 easily beats the Metabones in detail with the best detail on that “Classic Cars” sign. It really is like comparing different lenses when looking at the MC-11 and Metabones images with this particular lens!

In Conclusion

In summary, from my tests, all I can say is that the Sigma MC-11 is my choice for adapting wide angle lenses as it gives the best performance across the frame.

Please note that for different lenses, autofocus performance may vary depending on the adapter and camera you are using so do not take this article as a recommendation to always pick one adapter over the other in terms of autofocus. This test was specifically about sharpness across the frame for wide angle lenses.

While my experience with the Metabones V is similar to what I saw with my previous Metabones IV, I still decided to contact Metabones support about this to see if they want to provide another adapter for re-test or can offer an explanation for this behavior. I have read about users shimming their adapters to correct for similar issues, so is this a manufacturing problem with some Metabones adapters or a design issue with all of them?

I am hoping to hear from their tech support soon so I can update the article, but in the meantime, I will stick to the MC-11 for wide angle lenses.


About the author: Luis Gabriel Gerena is a Utah-based portrait photographer. The opinions expressed in this article are solely those of the author. You can find more of his work on his website, YouTube, Facebook, and Instagram.


Source: PetaPixel

Metabones Degrades the Edge Image Quality of Wide-Angle Lenses

Fujifilm 33mm f/1.0 Set to Be the First Mirrorless f/1.0 Autofocus Lens

Fujifilm 33mm f/1.0 Set to Be the First Mirrorless f/1.0 Autofocus Lens

In addition to its two new lenses announced yesterday, the 200mm f/2 and the 8-16mm f/2.8, Fujifilm has also revealed three upcoming lenses that are now on its roadmap: the 16mm f/2.8, 16-80mm f/4 OIS, and 33mm f/1. The 35mm lens is the first confirmed f/1.0 autofocusing lens in the world of mirrorless cameras.

The 35mm lens will be the equivalent of a 50mm f/1.0 lens in 35mm terms. Fujifilm’s current fastest lens is the 56mm f/1.2, which costs $999.

Fujifilm is planning to launch the 35mm f/1 sometime in 2020, which is still pretty far off, and quite a bit could change in the camera industry between now and then.

Nikon is reportedly planning to announce two full frame mirrorless cameras in the coming weeks, and it’s known that Nikon recently filed a trademark in the EU for the word “Noct,” which the company historically used for ultra-fast lenses. In 2017, Nikon also patented a 52mm f/0.9 full frame mirrorless lens.

But unless another camera brand does beat Fujifilm to the punch, the newly revealed 33mm f/1.0 currently “stands to be the first mirrorless lens with a maximum aperture of F1.0 with AF capability,” Fujifilm says.

The 16mm f/2.8 and 16-80mm f/4 OIS

Fujifilm’s other two nearly revealed lenses, the 16mm f/2.8 and 16-80mm f/4 OIS, will launch a year earlier in 2019.

The Fujifilm XF 16mm f/2.8 R WR is a compact prime lens that is equivalent to a 24mm lens in 35mm terms, “making it the perfect choice for landscape and travel photography,” Fujifilm says.

The Fujifilm XF 16-80mm f/4 R OIS WR is equivalent to a 24-122mm lens in 35mm terms, and it’s intended to serve as a versatile lens that can cover a wide range of subjects and scenes.

The Latest Fujifilm Lens Roadmap

With the addition of these three upcoming lenses, here’s what the new Fujifilm lens roadmap looks like:


Source: PetaPixel

Fujifilm 33mm f/1.0 Set to Be the First Mirrorless f/1.0 Autofocus Lens

Making her Mark: Feng Chen Wang

Making her Mark: Feng Chen Wang
Feng Chen Wang’s  VFILES biography reads “translating the anatomical into the sartorial.” Just about anyone who bears witness to anything from the designer’s tangible collections to her intangible vibrant disposition can attest to the validity of this statement.  Luckily for V, we got to experience both. “Feng,” and she refers to herself, produces works inherently anecdotal, but that also somehow convey the themes and motifs pertaining to humanity at large: Her most recent Spring 2019…

Keep on reading: Making her Mark: Feng Chen Wang
Source: V Magazine

Making her Mark: Feng Chen Wang

Taylor Swift Is Back In The Studio

Taylor Swift Is Back In The Studio
It’s been a busy week for Taylor Swift. The pop superstar, who has been staying in New York in between shows on her Reputation Stadium Tour, was photographed leaving a recording studio on Wednesday night. After waiting three years for the Reputation album, the next TS era may be sooner than we think. Earlier this year, Taylor revealed that she’ll be releasing another album before she turns 30 next year. Although she’s still headlining the Reputation tour until November, the busy singer’s sure…

Keep on reading: Taylor Swift Is Back In The Studio
Source: V Magazine

Taylor Swift Is Back In The Studio

Coal Mining Photographed with a 100-Megapixel Camera

Coal Mining Photographed with a 100-Megapixel Camera

After reading about how mining-related injuries and deaths are systematically covered up by many authorities, Swedish photographer Sebastian Sardi began a project in 2008 called Black Diamond that focuses on miners and mines.

The photographer, who splits his time between Denmark and Sweden, has spent the past several years photographing the burning coalfields of Jharkhand in East India, first with a film camera and subsequently with a 100-megapixel Phase One XF 100MP camera.

“I don’t think anyone has ever taken a 100 MP camera out from the studio and down to dirty mines such as these,” Sardi tells PetaPixel. “The mines are apocalyptic, the people are hardworking, and the landscape is completely destroyed.”

Here is Sardi’s project statement:

It is an apocalyptic landscape. There are huge man-made craters everywhere that make up the visible landscape, the ground is burning, and a vast area is oozing with toxic gases, fire, and smoke. Amongst all of this, there are people digging in the soil with their bare hands. Coal is mined everywhere in Jharkhand, India, and large parts of it are sorted by hand.

The locals call it; ”Black Diamond”.
Energy produced by the burning of coal is the single biggest contributor to the man-generated carbon dioxide emissions. Coal is a major part in the issue of global warming. Many people have been forced away from these areas when companies and authorities recognized the richness that hides in the ground. Underground fires force people to relocate.

The mining companies claim they are unable to put out the fires, while the locals blame the companies for letting the fires burn so the coal can be reached and excavated from underneath their villages.

There is a fragile balance between nature and mankind. A sense of discomfort is felt in the slow but seemingly unavoidable struggle towards the collapse of nature. The human inability to break patterns is painstakingly visible in these photographs, as we knowingly keep on extracting the ground beneath our own feet.

Black Diamond is a close (self-)portrait of the people who work with extracting coal from the ground, as well as an exploration of our dualistic human nature and how oneself relates to the outside world while being a part of it.

Sardi is planning to publish his project as a hardcover photo book with the German publisher Kehrer, and the photographer is currently raising funds through Kickstarter to do so.


Image credits: Photographs by Sebastian Sardi and used with permission


Source: PetaPixel

Coal Mining Photographed with a 100-Megapixel Camera

Photog Dog-Piled by Croatia at World Cup Given 7-Day Croatia Vacation

Photog Dog-Piled by Croatia at World Cup Given 7-Day Croatia Vacation

The photographer who was dog-piled by celebrating Croatian soccer players at the World Cup — and who gained worldwide fame by continuing to shoot as it happened — has been given a 7-day vacation to Croatia by the country.

The Croatian National Tourist Board extended the invitation to Cortez, who’s the Chief Photographer of AFP Mexico:

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You can see how Cortez found himself at the middle of the Croatian soccer team’s goal celebration in this clip by FOX Soccer:

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Here are photos Cortez captured from beneath the dog-pile, including several previously unpublished views:

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Al Dia reports that Cortez received an email from the Croatian National Tourist Board with the offer of the all-expense-paid vacation. It stated: “Just make sure to bring your good humor and your camera. Please specify the conditions under you would like to visit Croatia.”

Cortez accepted the offer and is planning to visit Croatia in late August or early September.

“I think I will have the opportunity to see [the Croatian players] closely again,” Cortez tells AFP. “Not on top of me, but close.”


Source: PetaPixel

Photog Dog-Piled by Croatia at World Cup Given 7-Day Croatia Vacation

The World’s Highest Street Photo

The World’s Highest Street Photo

This is a tale of friendship, family, photography, and travel. Forgive me if I stray from the narrative of cameras and the like, but photography does not exist on an island. My claim to have captured the Highest Street Photo in the World admittedly relies on a relatively restrictive definition of what this genre entails. However, I will leave the nit-picking of definitions to others.

I believe a street photo usually has to be taken from a street (duh) and in an urban environment. Komic, a small village in the Himalayan Mountains, fits this definition as it is the highest village in the world accessible by road, sitting at 4587m above sea level.

The Journey

Before getting ahead of myself, we need to address the journey. The first stop is generally Manali, a town heaving with tourists keen to escape the heat of India during the summer months. The town has no airport, and to get there, you must take a 12-hour journey by overnight bus or taxi.

My taxi arrived at 4 in the morning, dropping my family in the deserted Streets of Old Manali. Old Manali is the where most of the backpackers end up, it is cheap and has a more authentic feel than the new town.

It is easy to see how many people fail to progress from this destination: marijuana grows in abundance. My son was a little surprised to see salt, pepper and a large bowl of weed sitting on the dinner table. It is perhaps this laid-back lifestyle that meant there was little street photography to be captured around sunrise.

The second stage of the journey took me through the Spiti Valley, to the small town of Kaza. To reach Kaza, you can take a local bus, a taxi or a motorbike. My arse was plonked firmly on a 500cc Royal Enfield Bullet. The journey includes some of the most famous (and dangerous) stretches of road in the world. Taeko, my son, sat on the back while my wife Faye followed in a jeep, driven by my good friend Sandeep. Having a backup vehicle is essential if you are on a bike as there are no gas stations or mechanics on the road. There is also no wifi, 4G or phone connectivity; you are on your own. Having a backup vehicle also meant I did not have to carry my gear, and this includes my cameras!

The journey was tough (Photo by Taeko Page)

For this journey, I took my Olympus E-M5 II, with the excellent 12-40mm Pro lens. This is a weatherproof setup, something I would need as the climate in the Himalayas is less than predictable. As a backup lens, I carried the Olympus 17mm f/1.8 prime, which ended up staying in the bag most of the time.

My second camera was the Sony RX100 IV. The RX100 IV is small and light, making it a perfect for when I wanted something to slip into my pocket. However, I do not believe this camera is sturdy enough for any serious travel, and the mechanisms of the lens have given me constant trouble. If I made this journey again, I would look at investing in one of the many ‘tough’ camera models out there.

A Happy Lama

Kaza is the central town of the Spiti region, it is small and bustling with far fewer tourists than Manali. The people were friendly and did not mind being photographed. However, Kaza sits at 4000m above sea level, and at this altitude things became tough.

While both cameras worked fine at this height, my brain did not. With oxygen levels seriously depleted, my mind functioned like a clockwork mouse in a honey jar. Issues such as too fast/slow a shutter speed or a wonky looking histogram, usually solved with an automatic flick of the fingers, became a seriously complex issue. For this reason, the Sony RX100 was the perfect camera, as it is a challenge to use anything but auto settings anyway! However, as I grew used to the altitude (puking, headache, shortness of breath), I soon ventured out with my Olympus. Finally, I was ready to head out by motorbike to Komic.

Lamas (Komic/ 4585m above sea level)

Komic comprises a monastery, a couple of houses, a homestay and a restaurant. Not a lot. Fortune was with me, and the day of my visit coincided with the full moon, an auspicious date for local Buddhists. A large group of locals had gathered from the nearby villages and were having a feast next to the monastery. Monks and Lama’s were dressed in traditional orange robes, topped with less traditional North Face fleeces. Women were in traditional dress and had been preparing food since the early hours. There was little chance of a candid approach, as I stood out like a leg of mutton in a vegan café.

In no time at all, I was approached by a lady in traditional dress who spoke perfect English. Despite her nomadic look, it turned out she had worked in Southampton; a town just 30miles West of where I attended university.

I soon found myself sat down among locals eating rice, dhal and veggie curry all washed down with sweet white tea. As is always the case, when you don’t ‘fit in,’ by far the best approach is to just hang out until you become part of the wallpaper. By the time I had left this unique place in the world I had captured a few portraits of Lamas and explored the monastery, coming away with some definite ‘keepers’.

Are they the best street photography pics in the world? Probably not. However, they are the highest!


A big thank you to my friend Sandeep for helping to organize and run such a wonderful trip. Also to my traveling partners: Faye, Taeko, Simon, and Debbie.


About the author: Chris Page is a street and travel photographer currently based in Bangalore, India. The opinions expressed in this article are solely those of the author. You can find more of his work on his website and Instagram. This article was also published here.


Image credits: Header photo by Taeko Page


Source: PetaPixel

The World’s Highest Street Photo

Ciara Debuts New Music Video for “Level Up”

Ciara Debuts New Music Video for “Level Up”
Ciara’s back, and as per usual, she’s not here to play any games.

Following up on her last release over three years ago, the queen of 2000s hip-hop and R&B is finally back on the scene with new single, “Level Up”, and an electrifying music video in tandem. After teasing the single on social media, the songstress who’s responsible for major hits like “Goodies”, “One, Two Step”, and “Body Party” finally dropped the music video yesterday.

 

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Keep on reading: Ciara Debuts New Music Video for “Level Up”
Source: V Magazine

Ciara Debuts New Music Video for “Level Up”