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Sony Unveils the HVL-F60RM Flagship Flash with Guide Number 60

Sony Unveils the HVL-F60RM Flagship Flash with Guide Number 60

Sony just announced HVL-F60RM, the company’s new flagship flash with guide number 60. It’s a flash that “combines continuous flash performance with advanced operability and wireless control,” Sony says.

The HVL-F60RM covers illumination angles from 20mm (down to 14mm with the wide panel) up to 200mm with “uniform wide-range zoom coverage without shading.” The unit can fire off 220 flashes with a single charge of the Ni-MH rechargeable batteries, and the recycle time between flashes has been dropped to 1.7 seconds (down from 3.5 seconds). Attach the new Sony FA-EBA1 External Battery Adapter and the recycle time is further reduced to 0.6 seconds.

The flash succeeds the HVL-F60M and is up to 4 times more resistant to heat than that predecessor thanks to new algorithms and heat-resistant materials.

Quick Shift Bounce on the flash lets you switch the lens from horizontal to vertical orientation (90 degrees left/right, 150 degrees upward, and 8 degrees downward).

The flash’s functions can be assigned to the four-way controller, center button, and control wheel to put your desired adjustments at your fingertips. In manual mode, the flash can memorize and recall TTL flash output.

Wireless radio communication in the HVL-F60RM is non-directional and allows the flash to be placed anywhere within 98 feet (30 meters) of the camera. The HVL-F60RM mounted on a camera can be paired as a transmitter with up to 15 flashes assigned to 5 groups as receivers.

Other features include independent output level (-/+) buttons, a comprehensive display, a dust and moisture resistant design, an LED light and AF illuminator, and a durable redesigned metal foot.

Here’s a 1-minute video that introduces the Sony HVL-F60RM:

The Sony HVL-F60RM will be available starting in April 2018 with a price tag of $600.


Source: PetaPixel

Sony Unveils the HVL-F60RM Flagship Flash with Guide Number 60

Pentax K-1 Mark II Offers ISO 819200 and Handheld Pixel Shift

Pentax K-1 Mark II Offers ISO 819200 and Handheld Pixel Shift

Ricoh has just announced the Pentax K-1 Mark II, a successor to the original K-1 that was unveiled in February 2016. The latest camera promises better image quality and enhanced performance for shooting in difficult environments.

The K-1 Mark II shares many of its core features and specs with the original K-1. You’ll still find the exact same 36.4-megapixel CMOS that eschews an anti-aliasing filter for maximum sharpness.

But Ricoh has added a new accelerator unit that helps shooting high-res photos with minimal noise in low-light situations. While the original K-1 had a maximum ISO of 204800, the K-1 II can go up to 819200. For video, the camera can shoot at ISO 25600.

“This makes the new camera ideal for low-light photography where higher shutter speeds are required,” Ricoh says.

The camera features a 5-axis image stabilization system, and the image sensor is able to tilt in all directions, which opens the door to additional features. These include auto level compensation, image-composition fine-adjustment, and Astro Tracer (for capturing sharp photos of the night sky).

The K-1 II also has a new Pixel Shift Resolution System II. The system still captures 4 rapid-fire photos and combines them into a super-high-resolution composite image, but this new version also captures RGB color data that helps create resulting photos that have even finer details and truer colors.

Pixel Shift Resolution System II also has a Dynamic Pixel Shift Resolution mode that lets you capture Pixel Shift ultra-high-res photos while shooting handheld. It “works together with the camera’s shake-reduction mechanism, by synthesizing the composite images while detecting the slight fluctuations of the subject’s position during the capture process,” Ricoh says.

On the back of the dust-proof and water-resistant camera body is an optical viewfinder with a near-100% field of view. Underneath it is a 3.2-inch, 1.037-million-dot LCD screen with a 3:2 aspect ratio and the ability to tilt horizontally (35 degrees), vertically (44 degrees), and diagonally.

The LCD has an air-gapless design that provides reduced reflections and improved visibility when shooting outdoors.

Other specs and features of the Pentax K-1 Mark II include a SAFOX 12 AF system with 33 AF sensors (25 cross-type), an improved AF Tracking algorithm for better photos of fast-moving subjects, a 86,000-pixel RGB metering sensor, AI-powered real-time scene analysis, 4.4fps continuous shooting (and a buffer that holds up to 17 RAW or 70 JPEG shots), an APS-C Crop mode with 6.4fps shooting (50 RAW or 100 JPEG photos), a shutter rated for 300,000 actuations, 1080p video recording, stereo mic and headphone jacks, built-in GPS, Wi-Fi, HDR, and dual SD card slots.

Here are some official sample photos captured with the Pentax K-1 Mark II:

Shot with Pentax K-1 Mark II and HD PENTAX-D-FA 28-105mm lens
Shot with Pentax K-1 MARKII with HD PENTAX-D FA 28-105MM lens
Shot with Pentax K-1 Mark II and HD PENTAX-D-FA 28-105mm lens
Shot with Pentax K-1 Mark II and HD PENTAX-D-FA 70-200mm lens
Shot with Pentax K-1 Mark II and HD PENTAX-D FA 150-450mm lens
Shot with Pentax K-1 Mark II and HD PENTAX-D-FA 24-70mm lens

The Pentax K-1 Mark II will be available in April 2018 with a price tag of $2,000. It’ll also be sold bundled with an HD PENTAX-D FA 28-105mm F3.5-5.6 ED DC WR zoom lens for $2,400.


Source: PetaPixel

Pentax K-1 Mark II Offers ISO 819200 and Handheld Pixel Shift

Christopher Kane Delivers the Party Dresses Of FW18

Christopher Kane Delivers the Party Dresses Of FW18
Christopher Kane’s FW18 collection is a fusion of intricate lace and beading, as well as elegant velvet with an edge. Kane, a designer who continues to evolve his already established aesthetic each season, further fuels his narrative with a collection that embraces the power of the ultimate party dress. 

The strength of this collection is displayed most in Kane’s dresses. Mixed materials, varietal lengths, and poised styling and silhouettes compliment each complex garment and their multi…

Keep on reading: Christopher Kane Delivers the Party Dresses Of FW18
Source: V Magazine

Christopher Kane Delivers the Party Dresses Of FW18

RED and Foxconn Team Up to Make 8K Cameras at 1/3 the Price

RED and Foxconn Team Up to Make 8K Cameras at 1/3 the Price

Cinema camera maker RED and Foxconn (best known for manufacturing the iPhone) have announced that they’re teaming up to create affordable professional-grade cinema cameras for the general public.

Nikkei reports that the two companies are aiming to slash both price tags and the physical size of cameras.

“We will make cameras that will shoot professional-quality films in 8K resolution but at only a third of current prices and a third of current camera sizes,” says Foxconn Chairman Terry Gou. RED’s cameras are popular in the filmmaking industry but cost upwards of $30,000.

Foxconn manufactured an estimated 40% of all consumer electronics sold worldwide in 2012, and in addition to the iPhone, it manufactures well-known products like the Kindle, Nintendo 3DS, Wii, PlayStation, and Xbox. Apple’s products account for over half of its sales, though, and Foxconn is working to reduce its dependence on Apple by branching out to new segments, Nikkei reports.

In addition to teaming up with RED, Foxconn is also expanding into the manufacturing of camera semiconductors, putting the company in competition with Sony and its market-leading core business.


Source: PetaPixel

RED and Foxconn Team Up to Make 8K Cameras at 1/3 the Price

Drone Causes Aircraft Crash for First Time in the US: Report

Drone Causes Aircraft Crash for First Time in the US: Report

After numerous reports of illegally flown drones interfering dangerously with airplanes and even denting a US Army helicopter rotor over the past few years, a drone may have just caused an aircraft crash for the first time the United States.

Bloomberg reports that the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) has opened an investigation into a helicopter crash that occurred on Daniel Island in South Carolina on Wednesday.

A student pilot and instructor were flying the Robinson Helicopter Co. R22 helicopter at around 2 pm when “a white ‘DJI Phantom quad-copter drone” appeared and flew into their airspace, says a Charleston Police Department report. The instructor grabbed the controls and attempted to avoid the drone, but the tail of the helicopter clipped a tree, causing a crash landing on its side.

Both the student and the pilot escaped the incident without injuries, but the helicopter’s tail was “significantly damaged” and the aircraft was totaled, The Post and Courier reports.

“The NTSB is aware of the pilot’s report that he was maneuvering to avoid a drone, but the NTSB has not yet been able to independently verify that information,” says NTSB spokesman Chris O’Neil.

“DJI is trying to learn more about this incident and stands ready to assist investigators,” DJI says in a statement. “While we cannot comment on what may have happened here, DJI is the industry leader in developing educational and technological solutions to help drone pilots steer clear of traditional aircraft.”

Authorities have not been able to locate the drone or identify its owner.


Image credits: Header illustration based on photo by Jitze Couperus and licensed under CC BY 2.0


Source: PetaPixel

Drone Causes Aircraft Crash for First Time in the US: Report

Instagram is Now Alerting Users When People Screenshot Stories

Instagram is Now Alerting Users When People Screenshot Stories

Instagram is testing out a new feature that Snapchat helped make famous: users are being notified when other people shoot screenshots of photos and videos in Instagram Stories.

Some users have begun seeing advance notices from Instagram saying that the next time they shoot a screenshot or screen recording of a story, the owner of the story will be notified:

https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js

The small percentage of users who have the warning feature activated during this test can see everyone who screenshotted their story by opening up the list of story viewers and looking for the new camera shutter icon next to usernames.

https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js

TechCrunch confirmed the existence of this new feature being tested with Instagram, which stated that, “we are always testing ways to improve the experience on Instagram and make it easier to share any moment with the people who matter to you.”

“To be clear, creators won’t get a specific notification when someone takes a screenshot of their story, it will only show up in their list of story viewers,” TechCrunch writes. “Instagram is likely using this test to see if the feature has any noticeable impact on engagement, before deciding whether or not they’ll roll it out to all users.”

Instagram also currently notifies all users when someone snaps a screenshot of a private direct message.


Source: PetaPixel

Instagram is Now Alerting Users When People Screenshot Stories

Sies Marjan’s FW18 Collection Is A Lucid Kaleidoscope

Sies Marjan’s FW18 Collection Is A Lucid Kaleidoscope
Sies Marjan’s FW18 collection is an neon kaleidoscope, bright enough to reinvent the fall season as we know it. The satisfying and very successful palette designer Sander Lak has curated for this collection serves as a witness to his unique ability to execute his vision in full.

A plethora of geometric layers makes up most of the styling within this collection. Some ensembles are perfectly dyed with a beautiful ombre technique producing a colorful cosmic effect. Lak has also stepped away fr…

Keep on reading: Sies Marjan’s FW18 Collection Is A Lucid Kaleidoscope
Source: V Magazine

Sies Marjan’s FW18 Collection Is A Lucid Kaleidoscope

Fujifilm X-H1 Photos and Specs Leaked: In-Body Stabilization Arrives

Fujifilm X-H1 Photos and Specs Leaked: In-Body Stabilization Arrives

Fujifilm’s upcoming X-H1 mirrorless camera has been leaked. It’s the first X Series camera with in-body image stabilization (IBIS), and it’s filled with features lacking in the X-T2.

Rumors of Fujifilm bringing IBIS to the X Series have been swirling for months, and the X-H1 will turn those rumors into reality. The details about the camera were leaked in separate posts by FujiRumors, Digicam-info, and Nokishita. The camera is designed for pros and features 4K video recording, a rugged build, and much more.

Here are the main specs of the camera, according to a leaked press release translated by FujiRumors:

  • 24.3 MP, X-Trans CMOS III sensor
  • X-Processor PRO
  • ISO 200-12800 (extendable to 100-51200)
  • 5-axis in-body stabilization of 5.5 stops
  • Electronic front curtain shutter, electronic shutter
  • Rugged magnesium alloy body
  • EVF with 3.69M dots, 100 fps, and 0.005s response time
  • 3-inch 1.04M-dot tilting touchscreen LCD
  • ETERNA Film Simulation
  • 4K at 24fps and 30fps
  • 120fps slow motion in 1080p
  • F-log (can be recorded on F-Log directly to SD card at 4K)
  • Video bit rate up to 200 Mbps
  • Built-in high-performance microphone
  • Improvement of AF algorithm
  • Dual memory card slots
  • Wi-fi and Bluetooth
  • 139.8×97.3×85.5mm dimensions
  • Weight 623g (673g with battery)

FujiRumors has also published a chart that compares the feature differences between the X-H1 and X-T2. Features found in the X-H1 and not in the X-T2 include Bluetooth, a touchscreen, Flicker Reduction Mode, electronic 1st curtain shutter, internal F log, 4K face detection, and SD relay recording.

Fujifilm will reportedly be officially announcing the X-H1 on February 15th, and the camera is said to have a price tag of $1,899 (the X-T2 costs $1,599).


Source: PetaPixel

Fujifilm X-H1 Photos and Specs Leaked: In-Body Stabilization Arrives

Instagram ‘Regram’ Test Lets Others Use Your Photos in Their Stories

Instagram ‘Regram’ Test Lets Others Use Your Photos in Their Stories

We reported in November 2017 that Instagram had begun testing a “Regram” feature similar to Facebook’s Share feature, which lets people repost your content on their pages with full attribution. Now Instagram is reportedly testing the ability to Regram other people’s photos in the Stories you create.

TechCrunch reports that the feature is currently being tested on a small percentage of Instagram users, so there’s a good chance you won’t see the feature active in your app.

“Instagram purposefully lacks a ‘Regram’ button to promote original sharing, but it’s easing up on that philosophy when it comes to Stories,” TechCrunch writes. “Instagram now confirms to TechCrunch that it’s testing an option that lets you share public feed posts from other users to your Story.

Screenshot via TechCrunch.

“This could let you add commentary and overlaid stickers to a meme, celebrity post or even a friend’s photo. For users whose lives aren’t so interesting, resharing could give them something to post.”

Here’s a short video by Zachary Shakked showing how the feature works:

After adding someone else’s post to your story, you can resize, rotate, and reposition the photo in your Story. There are also apparently two different display styles for how the Post appears in your Story.

If you’re not comfortable with the idea of your photos being shared in other people’s pages and Stories, Instagram will apparently allow you to opt-out of the “Regram” system. You’ll find an “Allow Others to Reshare” toggle after hitting the Menu icon on your Profile and scrolling through the available options.

Screenshot via TechCrunch.

No word on if or when we’ll see Regram for Stories appear as a feature for all Instagram users. Regram for Posts appears to have gone silent, so perhaps Instagram has decided to not allow official reposting in main feeds for now.

(via TechCrunch via DPReview)


Source: PetaPixel

Instagram ‘Regram’ Test Lets Others Use Your Photos in Their Stories

Sony’s Camera Firmware Updater is a Major Security Risk, Expert Warns

Sony’s Camera Firmware Updater is a Major Security Risk, Expert Warns

If you use Sony cameras, here’s something you should be aware of: a computer security expert is warning that Sony’s camera firmware update process has serious security risks that could put your computer and data in danger.

Photography and software expert Lloyd Chambers of diglloyd first reported on the issue back in October 2017. Chambers says that while companies like Nikon and Canon use safe in-camera firmware update processes, Sony uses a desktop-based updater that requires “administrative root access” to function — when given these permissions to your computer, the software could theoretically do just about anything.

“That means it can install things like a keyboard sniffer, transmitting everything you type to some hacker in Belarus, so to speak,” Chambers says. “Thus all your accounts, all your money, your identity, etc is placed at risk.”

Apple has been tightening up security in macOS, and Sony warned late last year that the latest security system in macOS 10.13 High Sierra may cause Sony’s firmware updater for cameras such as the a7R III to not work.

“Approaches that in essence require operating system kernel access are incredibly badly designed given the security risks,” Chambers says.

In January 2018, Sony unveiled its solution to the problem of its updater not working in High Sierra… but instead of responding to Apple’s stricter security with a safer firmware update system, Sony posted a tutorial teaching camera owners how to install the kernel extension and grant permissions in High Sierra.

A screenshot from Sony’s tutorial showing photographers how to grant permissions in macOS.

“The Sony kernel extension is (quite appropriately) blocked by macOS because it is a very very bad idea,” Chambers says. “In this day and age, requiring a kernel extension to install a firmware update for a camera shows gross ignorance of the security risks and in my view, is incompetence.”

Here’s what Chambers tells PetaPixel about how things currently stand:

The current status of the Sony firmware updater is unacceptable because it requires the user to assume that Sony software is free of malware. That the software is signed only guarantees that something was signed by Sony, not that it is free of any infection (infection could have occurred prior to signing).

If Sony software is ever compromised (including at the source code level!), that malware would have unfettered root/kernel access to the system until the system were wiped out (assuming such an infection did not overwrite firmware in various places, in that case the machine becomes dumpster material).

Since Sony Pictures with highly valuble intellectual property was hacked a few years ago (taking the company down for weeks), no user should ever trust what could become a “root kit” firmware updater for hackers.

The ONLY acceptable solution is an in-camera firmware updater. Even that is not risk free (the download process), but it does not directly expose the computer at the kernel level, or even admin level.

That there is risk is self-evident in Sony’s need to bypass what Apple now considers core security prohibitions. Indeed, the Sony kernel extension cannot just be installed but requires explicit enabling by the user after installation, that is, on the new iMac Pro with its secure enclave and much more locked down boot security.

If you’d rather not trust Sony and place the security of your computer in the company’s hands, Chambers recommends that you install the firmware update using a temporary virtual machine and then delete the VM afterward.

PetaPixel and Chambers have both reached out to Sony for comment on this security issue, but the company has yet to respond to our multiple requests.


Source: PetaPixel

Sony’s Camera Firmware Updater is a Major Security Risk, Expert Warns