Things to Watch

Photos of Cattle Branding in Argentina

Photos of Cattle Branding in Argentina

20 years ago, photographer Marcos Furer decided to move away from his life as a newspaper and magazine journalist in Buenos Aires, Argentina, and to the slower lifestyle of the inner country. His personal work has since focused on the people and lifestyle Furer sees on a daily basis around him.

“Traditions. Landscapes. The people still live like they’re stopped in time,” Furer says. At a local estancia, the ranchers have an annual tradition of gathering all the new cows together for branding.

One of Furer’s photos of this branding showing a dog lunging at a cow was recently selected from among 300,000 entries as one of the 5 winning photos of HIPA, the Hamdan Bin Mohammed Bin Rashid Al Maktoum International Photography Award.

Here are more photos from the same series:

You can find more of Furer’s work on his website.


Source: PetaPixel

Photos of Cattle Branding in Argentina

MAC Cosmetics Takes Over the Nicopanda Runway Show

MAC Cosmetics Takes Over the Nicopanda Runway Show
MAC has proven themselves to have an eye for talent, having partnered countless times with creatives who don’t even directly work in the beauty industry. Past collaborators have included the likes of Lorde, Nicki Minaj, and even the masterminds over at Disney. As of last week, fashion powerhouse and V favorite Nicola Formichetti proved himself to be the makeup brand’s new best friend, launching an exclusive collaboration between them and his self-made fashion brand Nicopanda. The new line was…

Keep on reading: MAC Cosmetics Takes Over the Nicopanda Runway Show
Source: V Magazine

MAC Cosmetics Takes Over the Nicopanda Runway Show

Photos of Car Attack and Refugees Win 2018 Pulitzer Prizes

Photos of Car Attack and Refugees Win 2018 Pulitzer Prizes

The 2018 Pulitzer Prize winners have just been announced. Photographer Ryan Kelly of The Daily Progress in Charlottesville, Virginia, won the Breaking News Photography category for his chilling photo of the moment a car attack slammed into racially-charged protests in his town — an incident that made national headlines.

“A vehicle plows into a group of protesters marching along 4th Street NE at the Downtown Mall in Charlottesville on the day of the Unite the Right rally on Saturday, August 12, 2017,” the caption reads.

The photo “reflected the photographer’s reflexes and concentration,” the Pulitzer Board writes.

Poynter reports that the photo was actually captured on Kelly’s last day in the newsroom before leaving to run social media for a brewery and work as a freelance photographer.

https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js

The prize for the Feature Photography category was awarded to the Photography Staff of Reuters for “shocking photographs that exposed the world to the violence Rohingya refugees faced in fleeing Myanmar” (you can view the full gallery here).

Reuters had originally entered the images in the Breaking News Photography category, but the Pulitzer Board made the decision to move the entry to the Feature Photography category.

https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js

https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js

https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js

https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js

For their wins, Kelly and the Reuters photo staff each receive a $15,000 cash prize and a Pulitzer Prize certificate.


Image credits: Top photo by Ryan Kelly/The Daily Progress. Bottom photos by the Photography Staff of Reuters


Source: PetaPixel

Photos of Car Attack and Refugees Win 2018 Pulitzer Prizes

A Timelapse of the Fastest-Ever Climb of El Capitan in Yosemite

A Timelapse of the Fastest-Ever Climb of El Capitan in Yosemite

On October 2017, rock climbers Brad Gobright and Jim Reynolds broke the record for speed climbing The Nose on El Capitan in Yosemite by making it to the top in 2 hours, 19 minutes, and 44 seconds. Photographer Tristan Greszko witnessed the climb and made this beautiful 7-minute timelapse showing how it went down.

The Nose is a nearly-3,000-foot vertical route for El Capitan, a mountain that was once considered unclimbable. Since the first ascent in 1958, the record time for The Nose had gone from 17 hours and 45 minutes in 1975 to 2 hours, 23 minutes, and 46 seconds for the previous record set by Hans Florine and Alex Honnold in 2012.

Late last year, after 11 previous attempts, Gobright and Reynolds managed to break that standing speed record with their unbelievable time.

“Watching this as it happened was one of the more incredible spectacles I’ve ever witnessed,” Greszko writes. “[A]n amazing display of superhuman mastery unlike anything I’ve seen before…”


Source: PetaPixel

A Timelapse of the Fastest-Ever Climb of El Capitan in Yosemite

Flash vs. Natural Light: Two Pro Portrait Photographers Go Head-to-Head

Flash vs. Natural Light: Two Pro Portrait Photographers Go Head-to-Head

Portrait photographers Manny Ortiz and Jessica Kobeissi just did a shootout that pitted flash against natural light. The two each shot portraits of the same model in a studio, except Ortiz used an off-camera flash as his main light while Kobeissi only used the sunlight bouncing around in the space.

Here are the portraits that resulted for the different outfits chosen:

Outfit #1

Natural light photo by Jessica Kobeissi
Natural light photo by Jessica Kobeissi
Natural light photo by Jessica Kobeissi
Natural light photo by Jessica Kobeissi
Off-camera flash photo by Manny Ortiz
Off-camera flash photo by Manny Ortiz
Off-camera flash photo by Manny Ortiz

Outfit #2

Natural light photo by Jessica Kobeissi
Natural light photo by Jessica Kobeissi
Natural light photo by Jessica Kobeissi
Off-camera flash photo by Manny Ortiz
Off-camera flash photo by Manny Ortiz
Off-camera flash photo by Manny Ortiz
Off-camera flash photo by Manny Ortiz

Outfit #3

Natural light photo by Jessica Kobeissi
Natural light photo by Jessica Kobeissi
Off-camera flash photo by Manny Ortiz
Off-camera flash photo by Manny Ortiz

Kobeissi says that her only challenge was adjusting to the changing sunlight throughout the shoot. Ortiz says his challenge was being constrained in mobility by his lighting setup.


Which photos did you prefer from this shootout?


Source: PetaPixel

Flash vs. Natural Light: Two Pro Portrait Photographers Go Head-to-Head

Ep. 271: The Lens That’s Never Coming Home – and more

Ep. 271: The Lens That’s Never Coming Home – and more



Episode 271 of the PetaPixel Photography Podcast.
Download MP3 –  Subscribe via iTunesGoogle Playemail or RSS!

Featured: Nature photographer, Alex Noriega

In This Episode

If you subscribe to the PetaPixel Photography Podcast in iTunes, please take a moment to rate and review us and help us move up in the rankings so others interested in photography may find us.

Show Opener:
Nature photographer, Alex Noriega opens the show. Thanks Alex!

Sponsors:
– Get FREE SHIPPING at BorrowLenses.com with code FREESHIPPING18
– Get FreshBooks cloud accounting FREE for 30 DAYS by entering PetaPixel in the “How Did You Hear About Us?” section at FreshBooks.com/PetaPixel
– More at LensShark.com/deals.

Stories:
A photographer’s unique lens is stolen and will never be returned. (#)

GoPro may be sold to a surprising buyer. (#)

Luminar’s Jupiter update deliver big speed gains and 300+ improvements. (#)

Why aren’t there more female nature photographers? (#)

Instagram is set to give users something long-wanted. (#)

NASA releases its stunning 4K capture of the moon. (#)

My other podcast with Brian Matiash, the No Name Photo Show.

Connect With Us

Thank you for listening to the PetaPixel Photography Podcast! Connect with me, Sharky James on TwitterInstagram and Facebook (all @LensShark) as we build this community.

We’d love to answer your question on the show. Leave us an audio question through our voicemail widget, comment below or via social media. But audio questions are awesome!

You can also cut a show opener for us to play on the show! As an example: “Hi, this is Matt Smith with Double Heart Photography in Chicago, Illinois, and you’re listening to the PetaPixel Photography Podcast with Sharky James!”


Source: PetaPixel

Ep. 271: The Lens That’s Never Coming Home – and more

Why This One Camera Costs $40,000

Why This One Camera Costs ,000

The Hasselblad H6D-100c is a 100-megapixel medium format DSLR that costs $33,000 without a lens. Throw in a Hasselblad H lens and the resulting camera kit can easily cost over $40,000, or more than the average car. Here’s a 5-minute video by photographer Tyler Stalman that explores why a single camera can be worth this much.

Stalman points out that it’s a very, very small subset of professional photographers that actually need the resolution and image quality of a camera like the Hasselblad H6D-100c. Even for advertising, giant billboards can be effectively shot with far fewer megapixels than you might think since viewers are looking from so far away (Stalman points out that Apple’s Shot on iPhone campaign is successfully done with just 12 megapixels).

“There are diminishing returns as you spend more on your gear,” Stalman says. “A $1,000 camera has most of the important features that you’re going to find in a $5,000 camera.

“But there are always professionals that are pushing the technical requirements of this gear to its extreme, and it’s incredibly expensive to research, develop, and manufacturing that cutting edge of technology.”

You can take a closer look at the sample photos featured in this video in this Flickr album. You can also find more of Stalman’s videos by subscribing to his popular YouTube channel.

(via Tyler Stalman via ISO 1200)


Source: PetaPixel

Why This One Camera Costs ,000

Take a Peek Inside Myles B O’Neal’s Dior Photo Diary

Take a Peek Inside Myles B O’Neal’s Dior Photo Diary
Another day, another amazing Dior party. This time around, the celebration was for their new fragrance, Sauvage Eau de Parfum. The party was held in Joshua Tree, California at the unique Pioneer Town Motel, where some of the VIPs included Tyler, the Creator, Goldlink, Jacob Banks, Skip Marley, 6lack, They, and Black Atlass. The party kicked off before the first Coachella weekend, and model Myles B O’Neal served up some looks accompanied with quips to chronicle the event, exclusively for…

Keep on reading: Take a Peek Inside Myles B O’Neal’s Dior Photo Diary
Source: V Magazine

Take a Peek Inside Myles B O’Neal’s Dior Photo Diary

Photos of Loneliness in New York City

Photos of Loneliness in New York City

Photographer Luc Kordas first moved from Europe to New York City in 2014 after living in six different countries in six different years. Since then, he has made his living as a photographer while doing street photography for himself. And one of the recurring subjects he has captured is the idea of loneliness in a big city.

“Loneliness is New York’s leitmotif,” Kordas tells PetaPixel. “This feeling is palpable everywhere in the city—a place filled with 8 million people, many of whom are immigrants and transplants. I witness the isolation and seclusion every day. There are different shades of it.”

“New York keeps surprising me even after almost 4 years of living here,” Kordas says. “I see it as a marriage of heaven and hell. All walks of life from all over the world walk the same streets of Manhattan – this bizarre Tower of Babel is a true feast for a street photographer.

“The city fascinates me one day and makes me think of leaving the other. I know many New Yorkers feel the same way.”

“Ironically, despite New York’s density, it is not hard to feel alone,” says Kordas. “So many people are focused on money or careers, that’s why they come here, there’s little time left for relationships or hanging out.

“William Klein said of New York it is a monument to the dollar. The dollar is responsible for everything, good or bad. Everybody comes for it, no one can resist it. Everyone’s busy.

“Although it isn’t difficult to find company, many of the interactions we have with each other are shallow. It’s easy to be lonely and anonymous in a city like this.”

This series is part of a larger body of work titled “The New York Chronicles.” You can find more of Kordas’ photos on his website and Instagram.


Image credits: Photographs by Luc Kordas and used with permission


Source: PetaPixel

Photos of Loneliness in New York City

How I Made a ‘Frankencamera’ Digital TLR

How I Made a ‘Frankencamera’ Digital TLR

I really enjoyed reading the Photography: The Definitive Visual History and it got me thinking about blending older forms of photography with newer digital equipment. I became obsessed with TLR (Twin Lens Reflex) cameras — not for their ability to view through one lens while capturing an image through the other, but for the style of photography that this type of camera forces the photographer to adopt.

Generally, you hold a TLR camera at your waist level so you can look down at the viewfinder to compose your image. Also, you need to use a crank on the side of the camera to move the film forward after capturing each image. Life seemed to slow down when I have used this type of camera in the past.

I thought, there must be a digital equivalent to this camera. So I searched the internet and I found a Seagull CM9 camera which was 10 megapixels. To be honest, I didn’t really like the look of the camera and that they were over $1000 on eBay. I even found that Rolleiflex made a Rolleiflex MiniDigi AF 5.0. I tracked one down and it is beautifully made, but the sensor is tiny and the resulting images are not great.

That is when I came across this post on PetaPixel that changed everything. I loved the idea of building my own waist level viewfinder camera using a camera with a foldable viewfinder like the Canon PowerShot N. I knew that I couldn’t make a digital TLR with two lenses, but this was an alternative that would give me a camera which I could look down from above to capture images.

I wondered to myself: instead of building a wooden box around the camera like the author did in his post, maybe I could use an old TLR camera as the frame and somehow insert the digital camera into the body. Before I knew it, I had purchased a less-than-fully-functioning Yashica-Mat TLR camera online and found a used Canon Powershot N2 (a model newer Powershot N used in the post where I got the idea from). Now it was time to see if I could make my idea become a reality.

The first thing I did when I had both cameras was to measure the N2 beside the Yashica-Mat. Ideally, the N2 would be small enough that I could simply fit it on the front of the camera. It looked like it might be too big but I still had to take the front lens off the Yashica-Mat. But before I did that, I took the back and the pop-up shade off the camera.

I had to take off the leather type siding to get to the screws. I wanted to save this siding but it was brittle and flaked off and broke. I didn’t worry about it and figured I would find a solution when I got to the point of putting the camera back together. With the screws exposed, the whole lens system came off quite easily.

It was clear that the N2 wouldn’t fit so I had to make my first big decision – cut into the top of the Yashica-Mat so I could slide the N2 camera into the body of the TLR camera. I talked to John Zobrist, head of Design Tech at UWCSEA East, and he helped me learn how to use the drill press. Before I could make the slots in the camera, I had to take off the sides so that I knew what I was cutting into. I took pictures along the way to help me remember where everything went and I put different sections into separate ziplock bags.

I used the drill press to create a slot in the Yashica-Mat so the N2 could slide in but I had to go back to the drill press to keep cutting and make some adjustments.

I needed to widen the space so that I could add a little felt so the N2 wouldn’t get scratched.

Now came my biggest challenge: to somehow attach one of the two original lenses back onto the TLR camera. I knew I would have to cut the original lens assembly into two separate parts but right away I saw that the bottom lens was way too big to put back on. The N2 wouldn’t fit with that lens underneath it. My plan was to turn the whole lens system upside-down and use the bottom lens instead. I might just have enough room but I still wasn’t sure. I started by taking the lens system apart so I could figure out how to cut it.

I used a hacksaw and tin snips to cut the separate parts of the front lens and make it as small as possible. I didn’t know if I was going to be able to reattach the parts but I felt that I would be able to figure out a way when I started reassembling the camera. I was solving problems as they appeared and I saw possible complications as puzzles to figure out. How could I make this work? What possible approaches could I take?

I eventually figured out a way to reattach the lens to the body that involved reconnecting the focusing system which moved the whole front lens system back and forth. Originally, I hadn’t planned on reattaching it because it would bump into the N2 camera but I decided to use the hacksaw to cut out sections of the metal so the digital camera could fit and I could reattach the one lens I had back onto the front of the camera.

Space was tight and I had to do some sanding of the metal parts but I managed to make it fit. You’ll notice in the photo below that the hole for the lens in the body of the TLR camera doesn’t line up with the lens that I had to reattach.

Then I started to reattach the rest of the parts of the camera. There were a few problems, like the winding mechanism that, if turned, would bump into the N2 digital camera. So I had to go back into the TLR camera and cut out some parts so it would still wind, but not interfere with the N2.

Also, to attach the viewfinder back on, I needed to cut off two metal sheets that slid into the body of the Yashica-Mat otherwise the viewfinder wouldn’t be able to be reattached. This also meant that I couldn’t close the shade of the viewfinder when the N2 was attached to the camera but there was no way around this issue. In addition to this, I took the glass prism out of the viewfinder because it wasn’t needed.

I put the sides back on the camera and the next step was to paint the N2 camera black. I went back to the Design Tech space at UWCSEA and used some matte black paint. Before I painted the camera, I used some fine sandpaper on the white parts of the camera to help the paint adhere better.

If you will remember, I had destroyed the leather siding when I took it off the camera at the beginning of the project when I first exposed the screws to open up the camera. I found a place on eBay that sells replacement siding for my camera and I am eagerly awaiting the arrival of my order so I can finish it off.

I have really enjoyed the process that took me from idea and inspiration to a camera that has the look and feel of an old-school camera with the convenience of a digital camera. I know that I am essentially using a digital point and shoot camera in a frame and I won’t have the quality of a TLR camera but this project is more than that. The next step is to take this camera out into the field and start capturing some images and see if it does change my photography. I am especially interested in capturing images of people from my waist level point of view.

I like the fact that the digital camera gives me options like the choice to shoot square format if I want. I like that I can choose to shoot in black and white too and see what the results will be right in the viewfinder before I even take the photo. I like that the process of capturing photos will probably slow down with this camera.

What is the point other than creating what I think is a pretty cool looking camera? Recently, the World Economic Forum posted a list of the “10 Top Skills That Will Land You a High Paying Job by 2020“. Not that getting a high paying job is the most important thing – but the list of skills is important for anyone, especially the students in our schools.

Numbers one, two, and three on the list of skills are complex problem-solving, critical thinking and creativity. I feel like this project embodied these skills. I wasn’t following a procedure or a manual. I was encountering problems that came up along the way and I had to come up with multiple options or solutions and weigh the pros and cons of each. I had to make decisions (like cutting into the camera) that I couldn’t go back and undo. I had to make sure that I was able to plan ahead and analyze the situation and think logically to complete the project.

And of course, it all started with me using my creativity to create something that was an idea that came to me while reading about one of my favorite subjects.


About the author: David Caleb is a photographer and digital literacy coach at UWCSEA East in Singapore. He’s also the author of The Photographer’s Toolkit and Stories Through the Lens. You can connect with him on Twitter. This article was also published here.


Source: PetaPixel

How I Made a ‘Frankencamera’ Digital TLR