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Nobuyoshi Araki Accused of Abuse and Exploitation by Long-Time Model KaoRi

Nobuyoshi Araki Accused of Abuse and Exploitation by Long-Time Model KaoRi

Inspired by the #MeToo movement, Nobuyoshi Araki’s long-time model KaoRi has publicly accused the renowned Japanese photographer of misleading her into working without a contract, distributing pictures of her around the world without her knowledge or consent, and failing to compensate her fairly for her time or for her her role in Araki’s work.

KaoRi modeled from 2001 to 2016 for Araki, who mythologized her as a favorite muse. On April 1, a Japanese blog published her detailed first-person account of her working relationship with Araki, including her accusations against him. KaoRi’s piece was translated with permission by Alisa Yamasaki and re-posted on Medium on May 1.

Noting that her relationship with Araki was “only photographer and model; we were never lovers,” KaoRi says she naively believe “someone so famous would never treat me poorly…I sacrificed myself by being polite.” She also says she was initially caught up in the photographer-muse narrative promoted by Araki and his acolytes: “I felt like I was contributing to his art,” she says.

But KaoRi says she ended up being objectified and exploited. “[H]e would tell made up stories about me in TV and magazine interviews, create and sell one book after the other without me knowing, give them titles like ‘KaoRi Sex Diary’ without my consent, make me pose in extreme ways in front of audiences, take all the credit for my performances,” she writes. Because of the stories he told about her, she says, “I was constantly hurt by daily harassment and stalking, fake videos of me disseminated on the internet, and friends who believed in the lies.”

KaoRi worried that the mental and financial stress she was under would result in serious illness. But when she asked Araki for better working conditions, he by turns ignored her, blamed her for her predicament, and bullied her.

Their relationship ended acrimoniously in 2016, at which point KaoRi was so caught up in the myth of the tragic muse that she was on the brink of suicide. When the #MeToo campaign began in the US, “I realized that I didn’t need to devote myself to his lies anymore.” She adds, “I don’t want any more models hiding behind the mask of art, hurting in the shadows.”

KaoRi offers an apology at the beginning of her piece to Araki’s fans: “If I end up destroying the dreams of photography fans, I’m sorry. Whether you believe my story or not, regardless of the Me Too movement, if you use my story as one perspective to view his art, that’s enough for me.”

Related:
Report: Terry Richardson Under NYPD Investigation for Sexual Assault
Second Model Accuses Bruce Weber of Sexual Harassment
Sexism in the Photo Industry: Can’t We Do Better?

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Nobuyoshi Araki Accused of Abuse and Exploitation by Long-Time Model KaoRi

AFP Photographer Shah Marai Among Dead in Kabul Suicide Bombing

AFP Photographer Shah Marai Among Dead in Kabul Suicide Bombing

Shah Marai, a photographer for Agence France-Presse (AFP), was killed today by a suicide bomber in Kabul, Afghanistan, the agency has confirmed.

According to reports, two suicide bombers detonated bombs in Kabul, killing more than 21 people and wounding 27. Marai was killed in the second blast, which targeted journalists who rushed to the scene to report on the first bomb, AFP said on its Twitter feed.

Marai was AFP’s chief photographer in Afghanistan.

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AFP Photographer Shah Marai Among Dead in Kabul Suicide Bombing

Obituary: Photographer Nitin Vadukul, 52

Obituary: Photographer Nitin Vadukul, 52

Nitin Vadukul, music, Ozzy OsbournePhotographer Nitin Vadukul, who created surreal and eerie images for commercial, editorial and music clients, died February 17 in New York City, according to The New York Times. His brother, photographer Max Vadukul, told The Times the cause of death was colorectal cancer.

Born Nitin Shantilal Vadukul in Nairobi in 1965 to parents of Indian heritage, he grew up in a suburb of London and began shooting photos as a teenager. He began his photography career working in a London special effects studio in the 1980s. Much of his early commercial work for clients such as Wace and BNP featured composites—created first using Paintbox and then, in the 1990s, with Photoshop. “Effects just for effects aren’t interesting,” he told PDN in 1993. “I use them in unconventional ways to get ideas across.”

He moved from London to Paris in 1990, and shot for international advertising clients. In the mid-1990s, he moved to New York, and brought his flamboyant, surreal conceptual style to portraits of actors and music industry icons he photographed for magazines such as Details, Rolling Stone, The Source and New York magazine, and for record labels. His subjects included Ozzy Osbourne, Rick Rubin, Dr. Dre and Eminem. Some of his music photos were included in Hip Hop Immortals, published in 2003 and in the 2012 exhibition “Who Shot Rock & Roll” at the Annenberg Space for Photography in Los Angeles.

After 20 years in New York City, he moved to Los Angeles in 2015.

According to The Times, he is survived by his brother and sister, his mother, and two children.

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Obituary: Photographer Nitin Vadukul, 52

Josué Rivas Wins 2018 FotoEvidence Book Award

Josué Rivas Wins 2018 FotoEvidence Book Award

First Nation photojournalist Josué Rivas has won the 2018 FotoEvidence Book Award with World Press Photo for “Standing Strong,” a project about the spiritual awakening that took hold among people resisting the Dakota Access pipeline in 2016. Finalists for the award were Zackary Canepari for “Flint Is a Place,” about the challenges of life in Flint, Michigan; and Danielle Villasana for “The Light Inside,” about the lives of trans women in Peru.

FotoEvidence, which announced the award yesterday, will publish a book of Rivas’s work this spring. The work of all three photographers will also be shown as part of the World Press Photo exhibition in Amsterdam in April, and at the FotoEvidence Book Award exhibit at the Bronx Documentary Center (New York) in June.

World Press Photo joined as a co-sponsor of the FotoEvidence Book Award last summer. The award, launched in 2011, recognizes a documentary photographer whose project demonstrates courage and commitment in addressing a violation of human rights, a significant injustice or an assault on human dignity. See FotoEvidence website for more information. Previous winners include Daniella Zalcman, Marcus Bleasdale and Majid Saeedi.

Related:

Standing at Standing Rock (PDN Photo of the Day Featuring Riva’s “Standing Strong” work)

Working as an Outsider: Danielle Villasana on Capturing Portraits of Transgender Women

FotoEvidence Teams Up with World Press Photo for New Photography Award

Photographers Explain Their Approaches to Covering Sensitive Subjects

Winning Gold in Flint

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Josué Rivas Wins 2018 FotoEvidence Book Award

Getty Licensing Deal with Google Suggests Thawing of Relations

Getty Licensing Deal with Google Suggests Thawing of Relations

Getty Images has announced a partnership with Google that includes a multi-year deal licensing deal. In a statement released by Getty on Friday, the two companies exchanged pleasantries, but offered few details about the deal. The “collaborative relationship” between the companies, said Getty CEO Dawn Airey, will allow Getty to work “closely with [Google] to improve attribution of our contributors’ work and thereby [grow] the ecosystem.”

The announcement comes almost two years after Getty Images filed an unfair competition complaint against Google in the European Union, claiming the search engine had cut into the agency’s licensing business. The new agreement suggests the two companies may have reached a détente, at least for now. An email to Getty contributors suggested that Getty had withdrawn its unfair competition complaint against Google. “After working cooperatively with Google over the past months, our concerns are being recognized and we have withdrawn our complaint,” the email said.

Getty had filed the complaint against Google, Inc. to protest changes made in 2013 to Google Images, which had not only “impacted Getty Images’ image licensing business, but content creators around the world, by creating captivating galleries of high-resolution, copyrighted content.” Google Images went from displaying thumbnails that linked to image sources such as Getty, to displaying galleries of large images that kept search users (and their behavioral data) in the Google ecosystem.

“They’re the ones monetizing all of that [image search] traffic and user engagement,” Getty General Counsel, Yoko Miyashita told PDN in an interview shortly after the company filed its EU complaint. “We’re a competing images search engine. Search engines thrive on queries, follow-on queries and all of that engagement data to continue to improve and smarten up the algorithms. We have customers who pay us significant licensing fees to have the rights to display these images. They’re wholly dependent on that traffic to generate the advertising revenue that’s required to pay for the images they license from us. To me, its an underlying fairness issue. All of these publishers pay for the rights to display these picture galleries and Google has done it for free. It’s really hard to compete against a zero-cost competitor.”

According to Getty’s email to contributors, Google will change the structure of its Image search platform, eliminating the “View Image” button that allowed Google Images users to view a high resolution image, and will also display copyright and credit information more prominently.

Related: Getty Files Complaint Against Google in Europe
Too Big to Sue: Why Getty Images Isn’t Pursuing a Copyright Case Against Google in the U.S.

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Getty Licensing Deal with Google Suggests Thawing of Relations

Alex Potter Wins First $10K James W. Foley Fellowship

Alex Potter Wins First K James W. Foley Fellowship

Photographer Alex Potter (right) has won the inaugural James W. Foley Fellowship for young journalists, fellowship administrator The GroundTruth Project announced last week. Potter will use the $10,000 fellowship to pursue a project about the effects of conflict on children in the Middle East.

“I am delighted that she will be continuing Jim’s legacy of moral courage and commitment to the truth,” said Diane Foley, Jim Foley’s mother and the founder and executive director of the James W. Foley Foundation. Foley was captured by ISIS while reporting on the Syrian civil war and murdered in 2014.

Potter, who is a trained nurse, has worked in the Middle East as both a journalist and caregiver. She was one of 250 applicants—including 100 photographers—for the fellowship. “Alex’s application stood out from the rest,” says Kevin D. Grant, co-founder and executive editor of The GroundTruth Project. “Her personal investment in public service is very much in keeping with Jim Foley’s model of journalism as public service…[and her] proposal resonated with the selection committee for its thoughtful approach and its focus on the victims of the fighting, particularly children, and how they are recovering.”

Applicants were asked to submit proposals about “education, health, culture, art, food, faith and other expressions of life in a region where too often reporters cover only conflict,” according to GroundTruth’s call for applications in October.

Funding for the fellowship is provided by the James W. Foley Foundation, with additional funding provided by New Yorke-based Correspondents’ Fund, a non-profit that provides funding and emergency relief for journalists in the US and abroad.

Related:
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Alex Potter Wins First K James W. Foley Fellowship

Steidl Ordered to Pay Photog $77K for 49 Lost Prints

Steidl Ordered to Pay Photog K for 49 Lost Prints

A German court has ordered the book publisher Steidl to pay photographer Lawrence Schwartzwald €65,000 ($77,392) in damages for accidentally discarding or destroying 49 portfolio prints, according to an Artnet News report.

Schwartzwald’s collection of candid photographs showed New Yorkers reading. He sent the 49 prints to Steidl in 2014 hoping to have them published as a book. According to Schwartwald, Steidl notified him in 2015 that the work wouldn’t be published. He told Artnet News that he asked Steidl to “please return my portfolio prints.”

They never arrived, so Schwartzwald sued the publisher in 2016. He valued the prints at $1,200 each.

Gerhard Steidl, publisher and company founder, told Artnet News that he didn’t reject Schwartzwald’s book; he just couldn’t publish it quickly enough, so Schwartzwald asked Steidl to return the prints.

But Steidl admitted that he had lost Schwartzwald’s work. “It just couldn’t be found,” he told Artnet News. “I didn’t sell it, auction it, or put it under my bed, it’s just not there anymore.”

Steidl’s lawyers told Artnet News that the prints were “most likely shredded according to the usual office procedures, as senders do not typically ask for the return of portfolio proofs.” (In 2013, Steidl told PDN that he receives 1,200 unsolicited book proposals per year.)

The lawyers called the situation “regrettable.”

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Steidl Ordered to Pay Photog K for 49 Lost Prints

Léonard Pongo Wins $5000 Visura Grant for Work on Congo

Léonard Pongo Wins 00 Visura Grant for Work on Congo

Léonard Pongo has won the 2017 Visura Grant for Outstanding Personal Project, for his long-term project “The Uncanny,” about daily life in the Democratic Republic of Congo. Pongo, a member of Noor who was named a PDN’s 30 photographer in 2016, will receive a $5000 cash prize and a 90-minute consultation with editor and curator Scott Thode.

Juan Arredondo was named the finalist for this year’s grant. His project “Everybody Needs a Good Neighbor” looks at the challenges facing former child soldiers in Colombia.

Visura hosts portfolios, builds websites and “connects professional individuals and organizations worldwide in the photography, film, and media industry.” The jury for this year’s grant was Gina Martin of National Geographic; Myles Little, former photo editor at TIME; Yukiko Yamagata of Open Society Foundations; Michael D. Davis of the Newhouse School of Communications at Syracuse University; and freelance photo editor and curator Monica Allende.
The jurors chose 20 honorable mentions. The list of honorable mentions and their personal projects can be found on the Visura website.

Previous winners of Visura grants include Justin Maxon and Jared Moosy; and Souvid Datta, whose honors (including PDN’s 30) were withdrawn after he admitted to plagiarizing work by other photographers.

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Justin Maxon and Jared Moossy Win $5K Visura Multimedia Grant

Leonard Pongo: PDN’s 30 2016

 

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Léonard Pongo Wins 00 Visura Grant for Work on Congo

Second Model Accuses Bruce Weber of Sexual Harassment

Second Model Accuses Bruce Weber of Sexual Harassment

Days after a model filed a sexual harassment lawsuit against photographer Bruce Weber, a second model has stepped forward with sex harassment accusations against the photographer, according to a USA Today report.

Model Jason Boyce filed a lawsuit against Weber last week, claiming he was sexually harassed by the photographer at a 2014 photo shoot.

Yesterday, model Mark Ricketson held a press conference and described how Weber made him feel “ashamed and embarrassed” at a 2005 casting call in Weber’s office. Ricketson said Weber told him at that shoot that he “looked tense,” then guided the model’s hand “lower and lower” toward Ricketson’s genitals. Ricketson’s account of Weber’s actions was similar to that of Boyce.

Ricketson cannot sue for sexual harassment because the incident happened too long ago. But he has offered to testify in Boyce’s case as a corroborating witness, according to a Huffington Post report.

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Second Model Accuses Bruce Weber of Sexual Harassment

Getty Images Announces Instagram Grant Winners

Getty Images Announces Instagram Grant Winners

Getty Images and Instagram have awarded $10,000 grants to three emerging photographers who use the social media platform to share stories of underrepresented communities:

Nina Robinson (@arkansasfamilyalbum) photographers her family and their community in rural Arkansas.

Saumya Khandelwal’s (@khandelwal_saumya) images follow the daily lives of young girls in Uttar Pradesh, India who are forced into early marriages.

Isadora Kosofsky (@isadorakosofsky) has explored social issues in America, including the impact of substance abuse, poverty, mental health and mass incarceration on American families.

The grants are provided to help photographers pay for expenses for the production of new work. The judges for the grant were photojournalist Adriana Zehbrauskas (a previous winner of the grant); artist Eleanor MacNair; Nicolas Jimenez, director of photography at Le Monde; filmmaker and photographer Jeff Frost; and Azu Nwagbogu, director of the Lagos Photo Festival. Entrants were nominated by photo editors and art directors throughout the photo industry.

Work by the winners will be exhibited at the Getty Images gallery in London, and promoted through Getty Images’ website and social media channels,

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Getty Images Announces Instagram Grant Winners (2016)

 

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Getty Images Announces Instagram Grant Winners