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Yunghi Kim Announces Winners of Her $1,000 Yunghi Grants

Yunghi Kim Announces Winners of Her ,000 Yunghi Grants

Ten photojournalists have won $1,000 grants from photographer Yunghi Kim, the founder and sponsor of the Yunghi Grant competition. The winners include:

Amber Bracken, for her work about Canada’s indigenous people.

Andreea Campeanu, for her project about the sex trade in Romania.

Mikala Compton, for a project about a pagan community in Missouri.

Marko Drobnjakovic, for a project called “The Last Yugoslavs.”

Brendan Hoffman, for “Webster City,” about small town life in middle America.

Lauren Justice, for a project called “Voices of Violence.”

Leo Novel, for “Breaking the Glass Ceiling,” about feminist activists in France.

Michael Santiago, for his ongoing project about black farmers in the US.

Andrew Seng, for a project called “Interracial Intimacy.”

Ines Della Valle, for “Spiritual Path of Ancient Egypt,” about the foundations of western spirituality.

This year’s winners were selected by Yunghi Kim and Contact Press Images director Jeffrey Smith. Applications were up more than 30 percent this year to 83, including 33 applications from women, Kim says.

“It was a challenge to narrow it to ten,” she said in a statement announcing the winners. “I am immensely proud of all the entrants of this grant: all are committed photographers who are part of our photojournalism community, all attempting meaningful work as best as they can manage, often under difficult circumstances.”

The grants are intended to help photographers “start, further or finish a project,” or to help cover “everyday life expenses,” according to the competition rules. To apply, photographers must be members of the Photojournalists Cooperative, a Facebook group for professional photographers only.

Kim initiated the grant two years ago to emphasize to photographers the importance of copyright registration, and to give back to the photo community, she says. She funds the grants with money she collects for unauthorized use of her work.

“YES it makes a difference if you copyright register your work and everyone should make a practice of it in your workflow. Thing of it as digital teeth brushing,” she says on the Yunghi Grant website.

Related:
Ten Photojournalists Win $1K Grants from Yunghi Kim (2016)

Hirve, Agusti and Demczuk Win $2,500 Each in Inaugural Wome Photograph + ONA Grants

Danielle Villasana’s Advice on Applying for Grants and Awards

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Yunghi Kim Announces Winners of Her ,000 Yunghi Grants

How to Keep Client Contacts Up-to-Date and Organized

How to Keep Client Contacts Up-to-Date and Organized

To keep track of photo editors and creatives as they move to new jobs, Emiliano Granado relies on social media to see if they post news. “I’ll take a screen shot of that to remind myself or ask [an assistant] to update their mailing address,” he says. Photographers Ricky Rhodes says he uses Instagram to keep track of art buyers and photo editors he knows. “People tend to move around a lot in this industry and I find this the easiest way to keep up with everyone that I’ve met.”

Rhodes also creates “simple Word documents full of notes” from in-person meetings. “After a few years of meetings across the country, it gets hard to keep track of everyone you’ve met, what clients they are working with, and what you talked about when you met,” he explains. He categorizes his notes by city, so he can reference them when he travels back to a place. “The notes that I keep really help me remember minute details that I may otherwise forget.” See more in our story “How to Build and Organize Your Marketing Database.”

Related:
How Rolling Stone.com Finds and Hires Photographers
Ilise Benun on Creating a Marketing Plan That Works for You
Selin Maitreya on Having a Product to Sell, and Marketing It with Consistency
WIRED Magazine’s Maria Lokke: Who I’ve Hired

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How to Keep Client Contacts Up-to-Date and Organized

How to Improve Creative Collaborations with Clients

How to Improve Creative Collaborations with Clients

Influential food stylist Victoria Granof says the basic the ingredient of a good creative collaborations is good communication. She says she’s lately been working with a “brand therapist,” who outlines three steps to productive collaboration: acknowledging the original idea, affirming its worth and then enhancing and expanding on it.

The first step, Granof explains, means articulating the concept. For example: “I hear that you want this steak to look rustic on a wooden background.” The second step—affirmation—means saying: “I think that’s a great idea. I understand that you want it to look like it came straight from the ranch.” In the third step, the concept can be built on or expanded, with both parties contributing ideas based on their understanding of the intended direction and the end goal.

That three-step approach builds rapport, and can be helpful when working with clients who are not sure what they want. Granof says it’s not unusual in a pre-production meeting for a client to tell her she has free reign, but then decide that the concepts she comes up with are “way off brand.” Using the three-step approach, she can tease out what the client really wants.

From “What Makes Creative Collaborations Successful”

Related:
How to Make the Most of a Creative Call and Write a Successful Treatment
10 Questions to Ask Before You Bid on an Assignment
On Creative Calls, Be Confident, Not Cockey

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How to Improve Creative Collaborations with Clients

How to Pass a Creative Call Audition

How to Pass a Creative Call Audition

Creative calls are part of the bidding process for advertising work. They give creatives a chance to assess their chemistry with a photographer, and they give photographers a chance to show their ideas—and their enthusiasm—for a particular job. When we asked Jason Lau, art and content producer at creative agency 180LA what advice he had for photographers about how to present themselves on a creative call, here’s what he told us:

“Sound engaged. Don’t go overboard and sound overly happy. We want to hear your ideas. This is a collaborative process. The work is what gets you in the door, but the steps that follow are about how you engage with us and how you collaborate. If you need maybe 20 minutes to have a Zen moment and pull yourself together [before the call], take that 20 minutes. In the 13 years I’ve been doing this, I can probably count on one hand the number of bad phone calls I’ve had. The agent will say: ‘How did that go? I’ll say: ‘To be honest, that was bad. You may need to pick it up in the treatment,’ or maybe we won’t even move forward with that person.”

Related:
How to Make the Most of a Creative Call and Write a Successful Treatment
Estimating 2.0: How to Price Ad Jobs for Print, Web and Social Media
Reps and Creative on the Importance of Treatments in Winning Commercial Jobs
John Keatley on Preparation and Client Relationships

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How to Pass a Creative Call Audition

Alex Potter Wins First $10K James W. Foley Fellowship

Alex Potter Wins First K James W. Foley Fellowship

Photographer Alex Potter (right) has won the inaugural James W. Foley Fellowship for young journalists, fellowship administrator The GroundTruth Project announced last week. Potter will use the $10,000 fellowship to pursue a project about the effects of conflict on children in the Middle East.

“I am delighted that she will be continuing Jim’s legacy of moral courage and commitment to the truth,” said Diane Foley, Jim Foley’s mother and the founder and executive director of the James W. Foley Foundation. Foley was captured by ISIS while reporting on the Syrian civil war and murdered in 2014.

Potter, who is a trained nurse, has worked in the Middle East as both a journalist and caregiver. She was one of 250 applicants—including 100 photographers—for the fellowship. “Alex’s application stood out from the rest,” says Kevin D. Grant, co-founder and executive editor of The GroundTruth Project. “Her personal investment in public service is very much in keeping with Jim Foley’s model of journalism as public service…[and her] proposal resonated with the selection committee for its thoughtful approach and its focus on the victims of the fighting, particularly children, and how they are recovering.”

Applicants were asked to submit proposals about “education, health, culture, art, food, faith and other expressions of life in a region where too often reporters cover only conflict,” according to GroundTruth’s call for applications in October.

Funding for the fellowship is provided by the James W. Foley Foundation, with additional funding provided by New Yorke-based Correspondents’ Fund, a non-profit that provides funding and emergency relief for journalists in the US and abroad.

Related:
Danish Photojournalist Released in Syria after 13 Months in Captivity
Photographer Kamaran Najm’s Friends Break Silence on His 2014 Kidnapping

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Alex Potter Wins First K James W. Foley Fellowship

How to Get Better Work from Your Retoucher

How to Get Better Work from Your Retoucher

“Often times, the dialogue that happens between a retoucher and photographer before the shoot can result in a strategy or new idea that can significantly improve the final product,” says retoucher Zach Vitale. He often advises photographers on how to shoot elements for a composite and what variations and exposures he’ll need for post-production to put all the elements together in a believable way. The communication should then continue. If a client asks for a last minute change, keep your retoucher informed, Vitale advises. If the changes are complex, he says, “I set extra time aside for post-production, communicate any potential scheduling issues as a result of it, and bring up any budget issues that might arise due to the extra work. It ends up saving a ton of headaches later on.”

See: “How To Make Your Retoucher Happy

Related:
14 Great Image Editing Programs for Photographers
Is the Future Unretouched?

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How to Get Better Work from Your Retoucher

Steidl Ordered to Pay Photog $77K for 49 Lost Prints

Steidl Ordered to Pay Photog K for 49 Lost Prints

A German court has ordered the book publisher Steidl to pay photographer Lawrence Schwartzwald €65,000 ($77,392) in damages for accidentally discarding or destroying 49 portfolio prints, according to an Artnet News report.

Schwartzwald’s collection of candid photographs showed New Yorkers reading. He sent the 49 prints to Steidl in 2014 hoping to have them published as a book. According to Schwartwald, Steidl notified him in 2015 that the work wouldn’t be published. He told Artnet News that he asked Steidl to “please return my portfolio prints.”

They never arrived, so Schwartzwald sued the publisher in 2016. He valued the prints at $1,200 each.

Gerhard Steidl, publisher and company founder, told Artnet News that he didn’t reject Schwartzwald’s book; he just couldn’t publish it quickly enough, so Schwartzwald asked Steidl to return the prints.

But Steidl admitted that he had lost Schwartzwald’s work. “It just couldn’t be found,” he told Artnet News. “I didn’t sell it, auction it, or put it under my bed, it’s just not there anymore.”

Steidl’s lawyers told Artnet News that the prints were “most likely shredded according to the usual office procedures, as senders do not typically ask for the return of portfolio proofs.” (In 2013, Steidl told PDN that he receives 1,200 unsolicited book proposals per year.)

The lawyers called the situation “regrettable.”

Related Articles
Why Gerhard Steidl is a Book Publishing Master

How to Submit a Book Proposal to Gerhard Steidl

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Steidl Ordered to Pay Photog K for 49 Lost Prints

Elinor Carucci on Photographing a Bad (but Fascinating) Kiss

Elinor Carucci on Photographing a Bad (but Fascinating) Kiss

The December 11 issue of The New Yorker features Elinor Carucci’s arresting close-up photograph of a kiss, shot on assignment to accompany a short story by Kristen Roupenian. The story, about the self-deceptions and self-abnegation of a young woman who goes on a couple of dates with an older man, has drawn a lot of attention, at least in part, one could argue, because Carucci’s photo is such an inducement to read it. The photograph, which is deceptively simple, manages to capture a “grisly imbalance of desire,” as New Yorker staff writer Amanda Petrusich explains in an interview with Carucci about how the image was created—with a real-life couple as her models.

Here’s a short excerpt of that interview. The full interview, available on The New Yorker’s Photo Booth blog, is well worth reading.

Amanda Petrusich: Did you know you wanted his mouth to be open and hers to be closed?
Elinor Carucci: In the story, [the protagonist-narrator] talks about how aggressive and overwhelming his kiss is. He’s doing too much. His tongue is in her throat. I wanted to try and get something that would feel like she’s gentle and he’s just doing too much. With every photo shoot, I have an idea of what I want to get, but then when you’re there, with people, they’re who they are—and there’s a dynamism to their feel, their physicality, their smell, what they’re doing, and I have to follow that.

AP: The blackness between his lips feels really purposeful.
EC: The kisses were so alive. They were happening right in front of me. But we did play with almost-kissing, kissing, slow-motion kissing. I tried to work with who they were, but also to direct them in a way that would allow me to take pictures. Some of it was also about—I don’t want to sound too poetic—but it was about the conceptual space between a couple, any couple. Even if you’ve been married for 20 years, there’s something that’s always there, between two people. With the composition, I wanted to create that space.

Related:
PDN Photo of the Day: Elinor Carucci, “Eye,” 1996
PDN Photo of the Day: Elinor Carucci (2008)

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Elinor Carucci on Photographing a Bad (but Fascinating) Kiss

European Press Agencies to Google, Facebook: Pay Up

European Press Agencies to Google, Facebook: Pay Up

Nine European press agencies on Wednesday published an op-ed in Le Monde arguing that Google and Facebook should be required to pay copyright royalties on the third-party news and information they distribute and profit from. The article was published as the European Parliament is debating new legislation that would, according to Agence France-Presse, “make Facebook, Google, Twitter and other major players pay for the millions of news articles they use or link to.” The arguments laid out in the statement should have photojournalists, editorial photographers and anyone who cares about the fate of media organizations in the digital age, nodding in unison.

Despite earning the majority of dollars spent on digital advertising, Google and Facebook, the agencies wrote, “do not have journalists in Syria risking their lives, nor a bureau in Zimbabwe investigating Mugabe’s departure, nor editors to check and verify information sent in by reporters on the ground.” Reporting costs someone money, in other words, and if news and information are so essential to the user experience on Google, Facebook and other digital platforms, those companies should pay for that content.

“Access to free information is supposedly one of the great victories of the internet. But it is a myth,” the agencies wrote.

They also argued that the tech giants’ hoarding of ad dollars was a threat to democracy. “Free and reliable newsgathering is now threatened because the media will simply no longer be able to pay for it,” they said.

The coalition that authored the op-ed includes French agency AFP; Dutch agency ANP; Italian agency Ansa; Austria’s APA; Belgium’s Belga; German agency DPA; Spanish agency EFE; Britain’s Press Association; and Swedish agency TT.

Over the summer, Facebook announced they were working on a way to drive subscriptions for publishers who use their Instant Articles feature, which allows Facebook users to read news stories without leaving the Facebook platform. A group of publishers also announced in July that they were seeking collective bargaining rights so they could better negotiate with Facebook, Google and other online platforms that distribute news and information.

Related:

WHAT TO DO IF SOMEONE STEALS YOUR PHOTOGRAPHY

CONGRESS TAKES UP COPYRIGHT REFORM—AND WHAT IT COULD MEAN FOR YOU

IF WE SPEND $25K ON A PHOTO ESSAY, READERS SHOULD PAY TO SEE IT, SAYS HARPER’S PUBLISHER

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European Press Agencies to Google, Facebook: Pay Up

Celebrity Photographer Jesse Dittmar’s Advice to Assistants

Celebrity Photographer Jesse Dittmar’s Advice to Assistants

There are assistants who get a lot of work, and assistants who don’t.  Celebrity photographer Jesse Dittmar sheds light on the difference, explaining how assistants can please the photographers who hire them, and get called back for more work:

Livelihoods and a lot of money are at stake on photo shoots, he says. “It’s not play time, it’s not, hey, I get to meet all these cool celebrities. It’s real work.

“Your job is to do everything in your power to make the shoot easier, and help the photographer you’re working for make the pictures better.” He goes on to explain that you can’t do those things if you’re on set taking pictures behind the scenes, posting to Instagram, texting your friends, flirting with models, looking over the client’s shoulder, or engaging in any other tempting distractions. He says, “A lot of [young assistants] are looking more than doing, and that gets old quick.”

For young assistants, it is especially tempting to look over the digital tech’s shoulder. “A lot of people want to see Polaroids and I was one of those guys. You see the lights around you, and you’re like, ‘Oh my god, what does that look like [in the picture]? It’s a natural desire to have, especially if you’re trying to learn,” Dittmar says. “Looking over the digital tech’s and the photographer’s shoulders to make a decision about how to change the lighting–that’s not your job. You’re not working if you’re looking at the images.”

For more tips from Dittmar and other photographers, see: 9 Tips for Getting Hired (and Re-Hired) As a Photo Assistant

Related:
From Assistant to Photographer: How Jesse Dittmar Launched His Portrait Photography Career
What Paul Costello Learned Assisting Ellen von Unwerth
Art Streiber on Why Sharing Knowledge and Techniques Openly Benefits Him—and Photography
PhotoPlus Expo: Getting Your Career Off the Ground

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Celebrity Photographer Jesse Dittmar’s Advice to Assistants