advertising

Nobuyoshi Araki Accused of Abuse and Exploitation by Long-Time Model KaoRi

Nobuyoshi Araki Accused of Abuse and Exploitation by Long-Time Model KaoRi

Inspired by the #MeToo movement, Nobuyoshi Araki’s long-time model KaoRi has publicly accused the renowned Japanese photographer of misleading her into working without a contract, distributing pictures of her around the world without her knowledge or consent, and failing to compensate her fairly for her time or for her her role in Araki’s work.

KaoRi modeled from 2001 to 2016 for Araki, who mythologized her as a favorite muse. On April 1, a Japanese blog published her detailed first-person account of her working relationship with Araki, including her accusations against him. KaoRi’s piece was translated with permission by Alisa Yamasaki and re-posted on Medium on May 1.

Noting that her relationship with Araki was “only photographer and model; we were never lovers,” KaoRi says she naively believe “someone so famous would never treat me poorly…I sacrificed myself by being polite.” She also says she was initially caught up in the photographer-muse narrative promoted by Araki and his acolytes: “I felt like I was contributing to his art,” she says.

But KaoRi says she ended up being objectified and exploited. “[H]e would tell made up stories about me in TV and magazine interviews, create and sell one book after the other without me knowing, give them titles like ‘KaoRi Sex Diary’ without my consent, make me pose in extreme ways in front of audiences, take all the credit for my performances,” she writes. Because of the stories he told about her, she says, “I was constantly hurt by daily harassment and stalking, fake videos of me disseminated on the internet, and friends who believed in the lies.”

KaoRi worried that the mental and financial stress she was under would result in serious illness. But when she asked Araki for better working conditions, he by turns ignored her, blamed her for her predicament, and bullied her.

Their relationship ended acrimoniously in 2016, at which point KaoRi was so caught up in the myth of the tragic muse that she was on the brink of suicide. When the #MeToo campaign began in the US, “I realized that I didn’t need to devote myself to his lies anymore.” She adds, “I don’t want any more models hiding behind the mask of art, hurting in the shadows.”

KaoRi offers an apology at the beginning of her piece to Araki’s fans: “If I end up destroying the dreams of photography fans, I’m sorry. Whether you believe my story or not, regardless of the Me Too movement, if you use my story as one perspective to view his art, that’s enough for me.”

Related:
Report: Terry Richardson Under NYPD Investigation for Sexual Assault
Second Model Accuses Bruce Weber of Sexual Harassment
Sexism in the Photo Industry: Can’t We Do Better?

The post Nobuyoshi Araki Accused of Abuse and Exploitation by Long-Time Model KaoRi appeared first on PDNPulse.

Source: PDN Pulse

Nobuyoshi Araki Accused of Abuse and Exploitation by Long-Time Model KaoRi

Photography Ads of Yore: Now You Can Own an Epson Computer with Kodak Diskettes!

Photography Ads of Yore: Now You Can Own an Epson Computer with Kodak Diskettes!

The first issue of PDN was published in 1980. It was a simpler time, when the world worried about nuclear annihilation, MTV was a year away from showing its first music video and Instagram’s founder had yet to be born.

To reconnect with our history and the history of our industry, we descended into the dusty catacombs of the PDN archives, brushed away the cobwebs* and found some of those early issues to bring you a look at what was considered cutting edge at the time. You can browse the growing collection of old photography ads here.

****

This installment dates back to January, 1985. Nearly 16 years after the U.S. successfully deposited humans on the Moon and photographers could finally get their hands on an… Epson computer (yes, they made them). With Kodak diskettes no less. What a time to be alive.

 

 

*In truth, most of our old issues are neatly arranged on a shelf in a brightly-lit conference room.

 

//z-na.amazon-adsystem.com/widgets/onejs?MarketPlace=US&adInstanceId=038d2681-fee4-48f6-a399-9b09df863f32

The post Photography Ads of Yore: Now You Can Own an Epson Computer with Kodak Diskettes! appeared first on PDNPulse.

Source: PDN Pulse

Photography Ads of Yore: Now You Can Own an Epson Computer with Kodak Diskettes!

Ego Is the Enemy: Detach Your Ego From Social Media

Ego Is the Enemy: Detach Your Ego From Social Media

By Pat Kay

Growth.

Real, personal, soul-fulfilling, butterflies in the belly-inducing growth. That’s the key to my happiness; my personal metric for success. It doesn’t matter what I achieve or how much of it I attained. I define myself as successful simply in the process of progress.

Lately, I haven’t been doing much growing. Neither in my personal career, nor in my photography career. It’s made me step back and really take stock over what defines my growth and what inhibits it – the people, scenarios and behavior that help or hinder me.

One thing that comes up time and time again is the notion of ego. Of elitism. Of a self-importance falsely perpetuated through a small ‘influence’, accompanied by a bunch of likes and a bunch of follows packaged up in a neat little box. Especially if you have a following, social media has a tendency to inflate your sense of self-worth, self-righteousness and level of perceived skill at an accelerated rate.

Of course, ego isn’t something we can all ‘do away’ with completely. As a basic human characteristic, it’s something we’ll all indulge in every once in awhile. But the problem manifests itself when we start to lose our humility, giving way to the gradual onset of surreptitious tactics the ego employs to grow itself and thus nefariously influence our actions.

In the act of breaking down my own behaviors and observing the behavior of others, I’ve found that it’s the micro interactions of everyday life that are by far the most toxic – because you don’t know they’re causing you harm and unconsciously poisoning your perspective.

With thousands of likes on any given post, it’s hard to feel invalidated about your own work. With so many people agreeing with what you do, surely it’s the right thing to do, right? But the catch is that it never really goes backwards – the more you feed the hamster wheel, the faster it turns. Eventually, your ego starts tying your ‘skill’ and your ‘creativity’ – you start tying the value of your work – to your engagement. You end up doing what the algorithm wants you to do. You stay consistent. You stay in your lane. It’s safe. It’s warm. It’s also so easy to become emotionally invested and infatuated with your own work.

But then, your creative flair burns out. You can only do the one thing for so long without it being soul destroying.

The very thing you become known for becomes the very thing that prevents you from doing any more of it.

The deeper down the rabbit hole you go, the more you start to inflict your own ego on others. Judging, criticising. Comparing their work to your own and seeing only flaws. Engaging in seemingly harmless banter destroying the work and success of others without stopping to consider the positive perspective to every story.

At first, it’s benign. It’s progressive. It’s slow. It’s creeps up on you. But it’s insanely toxic.

Your real, personal growth grinds to a halt, and you realize that you don’t want the company of misery any longer.

And after a long while of suffering through the pain, the weight of doing nothing eventually grows heavier than that of action, and so, you do something about it.

At the root of it all rests a little white lie; social media presence, influence, celebrity status, low or high, these socially constructed statuses are fake and should have no real bearing on your own sense of self-worth. Because once you take them away, you are but human. You are but the rest of us.

Having an audience means you have an avenue with which to share your work to enrich the lives of others. Nothing more. You have a responsibility to them, but not them to you. It should be a one-way street. Give your art to the world unconditionally and expect nothing in return. Not fame, not fortune, most certainly not ego.

By putting social media in its place – by detaching its importance from your life – you regain the perspective of reality. That you are not god’s gift to humanity or that you are not too important to endure the mundanity of everyday life.

Rather, return to the basic. That we are humans, sharing art with one another because it enriches our lives by provoking emotion and thought and love. That the more important attributes to personally strive for are humility, diligence and self-awareness.

The ego is the enemy. It always has been. Detachment is the answer, so remove it where you can.


Pat Kay is a freelance photographer and content creator based in Sydney, Australia. This post has been republished with permission.

The post Ego Is the Enemy: Detach Your Ego From Social Media appeared first on PDNPulse.

Source: PDN Pulse

Ego Is the Enemy: Detach Your Ego From Social Media

More Staged Nature Photos Discovered

More Staged Nature Photos Discovered

The world of nature and landscape photography was rocked by scandal last month when it was discovered that Marcio Cabral’s image of an ant eater approaching a glowing anthill had been staged (the ant eater in question was actually stuffed and placed into position).

Unfortunately, the scandal doesn’t stop there. There are, in fact, many more staged nature photos in circulation than one would initially expect, as researchers at Team Coco have uncovered.

The post More Staged Nature Photos Discovered appeared first on PDNPulse.

Source: PDN Pulse

More Staged Nature Photos Discovered

Photography Ads of Yore: Cut the Cord

Photography Ads of Yore: Cut the Cord

The first issue of PDN was published in 1980. It was a simpler time, when the world worried about nuclear annihilation, MTV was a year away from showing its first music video and Instagram’s founder had yet to be born.

To reconnect with our history and the history of our industry, we descended into the dusty catacombs of the PDN archives, brushed away the cobwebs* and found some of those early issues to bring you a look at what was considered cutting edge at the time. You can browse the growing collection of old photography ads here.

****

This installment dates back to January, 1985, when “cord cutting” had nothing to do with Netflix or dropping your landline.

*In truth, most of our old issues are neatly arranged on a shelf in a brightly-lit conference room.

 

//z-na.amazon-adsystem.com/widgets/onejs?MarketPlace=US&adInstanceId=6476c0b1-029e-495e-9db0-69cbac7c0f26

The post Photography Ads of Yore: Cut the Cord appeared first on PDNPulse.

Source: PDN Pulse

Photography Ads of Yore: Cut the Cord

Here’s What’s New at Instagram

Here’s What’s New at Instagram

Facebook is a bit embattled these days (maybe you’ve heard) but that didn’t stop Mark Zuckerberg from putting on his game face and introducing a number of new features for Instagram at the company’s annual F8 developer’s conference today.

Here’s what’s new for Instagram:

Share to Instagram Stories from other apps. Several apps, including GoPro and Spotify to start, will send content directly to Instagram’s camera where you can edit and add to your story or send it via Direct. You don’t have to connect your Instagram account to other apps in order to share to Stories.

Third party camera effects. Instagram will let third party developers create camera effects that users can try for themselves. If you see an effect you like in Stories from an account you follow and want to try it yourself, just tap “Try it on” and the tool will be added to your tray.

Video chats. You’ll notice a new camera icon at the top of a Direct thread–tap it, and you’ll be brought into a video chat. You can chat one-on-one or with a small group. This is currently in the testing phase and Instagram promises a global rollout “soon.”

Topic channels in Explore. The Explore tab is being reorganized to focus on content channels.

The company is also rolling out a bullying filter intended to cut down on online harassment.The new filter hides comments “containing attacks on a person’s appearance or character, as well as threats to a person’s well-being or health,” the company said. The filter is on by default but can be disabled in the Comment Controls center in the app.

Don’t Miss: Is Posting to Instagram Just Like Working for Free?

//z-na.amazon-adsystem.com/widgets/onejs?MarketPlace=US&adInstanceId=64bfdbfe-fb04-4075-b3f9-2677b0991372

The post Here’s What’s New at Instagram appeared first on PDNPulse.

Source: PDN Pulse

Here’s What’s New at Instagram

Quick Tip: Get the Right Insurance (It Could Save You)

Quick Tip: Get the Right Insurance (It Could Save You)

To save money, photographers cut all sorts of corners, especially when they’re starting out. Photographer Christa Renee emphasizes the importance of carrying proper insurance from the start.

“There have been a couple jobs recently where I would not have even been able to do the job if I didn’t have insurance,” she says. “Two different agencies needed to make sure I had insurance to cover the cost of the entire job if something [went wrong]. I have great insurance, as do my producers, but it was the first time I’ve had that come up as a hard line for the job. I had a horrible incident early on in my career where a shoot ended with a few of the talent in the hospital, just a total freak accident that was no one’s fault. I’m so happy I had good insurance, even though in the end it ended up being covered by the client’s insurance. But it was a big one: medical bills, plastic surgery. I was really scared. I had just had a baby. I remember calling Tom Pickard [insurance agency] in tears asking if I was going to be OK. All was fine in the end, but I will never not have insurance after that.”

There are various types of insurance for photographers, including liability, workers’ comp, disability, and other categories. To help PDN readers navigate insurance options and requirements, here are some helpful articles from our archives:

Insurance: What Coverage You Need

Crew Injury on Set: How to Protect Yourself

How to Figure Out the Employment Status of Your Crew—and Why It Matters (a story about workers’ comp rules and insurance coverage)

How to Pay the Bills If You’re Too Sick or Injured to Work

Related:
Financial Advice for Photographers from Photographers

The post Quick Tip: Get the Right Insurance (It Could Save You) appeared first on PDNPulse.

Source: PDN Pulse

Quick Tip: Get the Right Insurance (It Could Save You)

Fund Your Work: Upcoming Deadlines for Documentary, Fine-Art Grants and Prizes

Fund Your Work: Upcoming Deadlines for Documentary, Fine-Art Grants and Prizes

Deadlines for grant applications and submissions for several photo prizes are due in the weeks ahead. These grants and prizes support ongoing and new personal projects, photojournalism and news photography, and include photo grants specifically designed to support the work of photographers who identify as female.

Getty Images Women Photograph Grant
Sponsored by Getty Images and Women Photograph, this $10,000 grant supports a photographer who identifies as a woman, has already completed a substantial amount of work on a project and has “a clear vision of what further work is needed to complete the project.” Applications are due May 15.

MFON Legacy Grant
The goal of this grant is to support emerging and mid-career women photographers of the African diaspora. The $1,000 can be used to continue an ongoing fine-art or documentary project. The deadline is May 31.

(See also “How a Book About Black Women Photographers was Created, Funded and Published.”

W. Eugene Smith Grant for Student Photographers
The W. Eugene Smith Memorial Fund, which offers an annual grant of $35,000 and a fellowship of $5,000 to professional photographers, has launched a new grant for student photographers. The $4,000 grant is designed to encourage and support students whose work renews the tradition of W. Eugene Smith’s humanistic and compassionate photography. Applications for both the professional and student grants are due May 31.

Le Prix Bayeux Calvados-Normandie
Le Prix Bayeux Calvado-Normandie honors war correspondents for their documentary work on a conflict or its impact on civilians, or on news concerning the defense of freedom and democracy. Sponsored by Fondation Carmignac, the Prize includes a 7,000 Euro cash award for winners in each category: photography, television, radio and print reporting. The work must have been done between June 1, 2017 and May 31, 2018. Applications are due June 8.

The ICRC Humanitarian Visa D’Or Award
Supported by the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC), this juried prize is given to a photographer who has documented urban warfare, displacement and other consequences of conflict in densely populated areas. The work must have been shot within the past two years. The prize comes with an award of 8,000 Euros, and is open to both independent photojournalists and photojournalists working for press agencies or media outlets. Applications must be submitted before June 11.

Pierre & Alexandra Boulat Award
Named for one of the founding members of VII Photo and her photojournalist father, this award promotes the creation of documentary work with a social purpose, and is open to photographers of any age, sex or nationality who plan to produce a story in a journalistic manner. It comes with a prize of 8,000 Euros. Applications are due June 15.

IWMF Howard G. Buffett Fund for Women Journalists
The International Women’s Media Foundation’s Howard G. Buffett Fund for Women Journalists supports the production of “ambitious projects and underreported, globally important stories.” It makes a total of $230,000 worth of grants a year, and has two rounds of funding. The second round is open for applications from June 19 through August 7.

For more information on photo grants, check out our last “Fund Your Work” report, which included information on some photo grants due in May and June.

Want the latest news from PDN? Click here to sign up for our email newsletter and get the week’s top stories delivered straight to your inbox.

Related Articles
Daniel Castro Garcia Explains How He Won the 2017 W. Eugene Smith Grant

Hirve, Agusti and Demczuk Win $2,500 in Inaugural Women Photograph + ONA Grants

7 Grant-Writing Tips from 2017 Getting Editorial Grant Juror Chelsea Matiash

The post Fund Your Work: Upcoming Deadlines for Documentary, Fine-Art Grants and Prizes appeared first on PDNPulse.

Source: PDN Pulse

Fund Your Work: Upcoming Deadlines for Documentary, Fine-Art Grants and Prizes

AFP Photographer Shah Marai Among Dead in Kabul Suicide Bombing

AFP Photographer Shah Marai Among Dead in Kabul Suicide Bombing

Shah Marai, a photographer for Agence France-Presse (AFP), was killed today by a suicide bomber in Kabul, Afghanistan, the agency has confirmed.

According to reports, two suicide bombers detonated bombs in Kabul, killing more than 21 people and wounding 27. Marai was killed in the second blast, which targeted journalists who rushed to the scene to report on the first bomb, AFP said on its Twitter feed.

Marai was AFP’s chief photographer in Afghanistan.

The post AFP Photographer Shah Marai Among Dead in Kabul Suicide Bombing appeared first on PDNPulse.

Source: PDN Pulse

AFP Photographer Shah Marai Among Dead in Kabul Suicide Bombing

Sim Chi Yin Wins 2018 Getty Images and Chris Hondros Fund Award

Sim Chi Yin Wins 2018 Getty Images and Chris Hondros Fund Award

Beijing-based photographer Sim Chi Yin has been named the winner of the Getty Images and Chris Hondros Fund Award, which comes with a grant of $20,000. The board of the Chris Hondros Fund (CHF) announced the news today.

Now in its seventh year, the award supports photographers whose work shines a light on the shared human experience. The award was created in memory of Chris Hondros, the Getty Images photographer killed April 20, 2011 in Misrata, Libya. Previous winners have included Meridith Kohut, Bryan Denton, Diana Markosian and Daniel Berehulak.

In announcing this year’s prize winner, CHF board president Christina Piaia noted the “intelligence and rigor” of Sim’s documentary work. Born in Singapore, Sim has created both photographs and films, and been published in TIME, The New York Times, Le Monde and other international publications. Chosen for PDN’s 30 in 2013, she was recently named the Nobel Peace Prize photographer, and commissioned to create an exhibition about the effort to contain nuclear weapons.

In a statement, Sim noted that the Hondros Fund Award comes at a challenging point in her career. After recovering from a hand injury she sustained while covering a labor dispute in China in 2015, she had to rethink both how she uses her camera and the kinds of projects she wants to pursue. “I’m grateful for this injection of encouragement during a point in time when I’m at a crossroads in my life and my work as an independent photographer. This grant allows me to take more time to think about why I want to produce imagery and distribute them to consumers all over the world.”

This year’s Getty Images and Chris Hondros Fund Award will be presented at a reception on May 3 at the Aperture Gallery in New York City. An auction to benefit CHF and its fellowships is going on now.

Related Articles:
Do the Right Thing: Sim Chi Yin on Ethical Choices

Sim Chi Yin: A Case Study in Intervening in a Story

Kevin Frayer Wins Fourth Annual Getty Images & Chris Hondros Fund Award

Tim Hetherington, Chris Hondros: Remembering Them as They Lived

The post Sim Chi Yin Wins 2018 Getty Images and Chris Hondros Fund Award appeared first on PDNPulse.

Source: PDN Pulse

Sim Chi Yin Wins 2018 Getty Images and Chris Hondros Fund Award