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Photograph Ads of Yore: Situation Critical

Photograph Ads of Yore: Situation Critical

The first issue of PDN was published in 1980. It was a simpler time, when the world worried about nuclear annihilation, MTV was a year away from showing its first music video and Instagram’s founder had yet to be born.

To reconnect with our history and the history of our industry, we descended into the dusty catacombs of the PDN archives, brushed away the cobwebs* and found some of those early issues to bring you a look at what was considered cutting edge at the time. You can browse the growing collection of old photography ads here.

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This installment dates back to March, 1985 and tells the tale of Advertising Photographers of America President Bill Stettner’s unorthodox attempt to woo photographers into the APA fold.

*In truth, most of our old issues are neatly arranged on a shelf in a brightly-lit conference room.

 

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Photograph Ads of Yore: Situation Critical

In Monkey Selfie Case, Appeals Court Says Animals Can’t Sue for Copyright

In Monkey Selfie Case, Appeals Court Says Animals Can’t Sue for Copyright

A federal appeals court has affirmed a lower court’s dismissal of the infamous monkey selfie case, on the grounds that “the Copyright Act does not expressly authorize animals to file copyright infringement claims under the statute.”

The US Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit, which is located in San Francisco, handed down the ruling yesterday in Naruto V. Slater, a case that pitted a macaque monkey named Naruto against a photographer named David Slater. The monkey allegedly grabbed Slater’s camera in 2011 when the photographer left it unattended, and shot a selfie that Slater later distributed.

People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA) sued Slater for copyright infringement in 2015 on behalf of the monkey. A federal district court in California dismissed the claim in 2016, on the grounds that animals have no standing under the Copyright Act to make infringement claims. PETA appealed the lower court ruling.

Slater reached a settlement agreement with PETA last summer, a month after they argued the case in front of the appeals court. Slater and PETA then filed a joint motion asking the court to dismiss their appeal. But the appeals court refused to dismiss, indicating that it didn’t want the parties settling a case that had already been argued just to manipulate legal precedent or avoid an adverse decision.

By refusing to dismiss, the court was sent a message aimed mostly at PETA, which was trying to establish a legal precedent for animals. During oral arguments last July, PETA faced tough, skeptical questioning from the appeals court judges.

The appeals court said in its ruling yesterday that while Naruto has legal standing in court under Article III of the US Constitution, he has no standing to claim copyright infringement in particular because the Copyright Act authorizes people to sue, but not animals. One of the appeals court judges called PETA’s lawsuit “frivolous.”

In addition to rejecting PETA’s claim on behalf of Naruto, the appeals court ruled that PETA must pay Slater’s attorney’s fees and costs for the appeal. The case was remanded to the lower court to determine those fees and costs.

Related:
PETA Giving Up on Monkey Selfie Copyright Claim?
Appeals Court Skeptical of “Monkey Selfie” Copyright Claim
Selfie Copyright Battle: Monkey See, Monkey Sue

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In Monkey Selfie Case, Appeals Court Says Animals Can’t Sue for Copyright

Obituary: Photographer Barry O’Rourke, APA President and Stock Agency Founder, 84

Obituary: Photographer Barry O’Rourke, APA President and Stock Agency Founder, 84

Photographer Barry O’Rourke, a past president of the Advertising Photographers of America and co-founder of The Stock Market stock photo agency, died April 17 in hospice care in Brookfield, Connecticut. The cause of death was complications from Alzheimer’s, according to his son, Randy. He was 84.

Born James Barry O’Rourke in Providence, Rhode Island, 1933, he served in the Navy and enrolled in the Navy Photography School in Pensacola, Florida. In 1959, he graduated from the Art Center School of Design in Hollywood, California, and began sending story proposals to magazines. Playboy accepted one of his pitches, and then offered him a job as staff photographer. He shot 17 covers for the magazine.

In 1967, he moved his family from Chicago to Connecticut and opened a studio in New York City with his brother Gene. His photos of celebrities including Frank Sinatra, Dustin Hoffman, Arthur Ashe and Martha Stewart appeared in Time and Newsweek. In 1986 he published a book on glamour photography.

In 1981, O’Rourke and two other photographers opened an agency to license stock photos they called The Stock Market. They sold the business to Corbis in 2000.

He was elected president of APA, the photography trade association now called American Photographic Artists, in 1990.

O’Rourke is survived by his wife, Carol; his two daughters and his son; and three grandchildren.

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Obituary: Photographer Barry O’Rourke, APA President and Stock Agency Founder, 84

Is Ryan Kelly’s Pulitzer Prize-winning Photograph an American ‘Guernica’?

Is Ryan Kelly’s Pulitzer Prize-winning Photograph an American ‘Guernica’?

Jennifer Wenzel, Columbia University

On Aug. 12, 2017, Charlottesville Daily Progress photographer Ryan M. Kelly captured the moment that Nazi sympathizer James Alex Fields, Jr. drove his Dodge Challenger into a crowd of counterprotesters, injuring 19 and killing 32-year-old Heather Heyer. It’s probably the most enduring image to emerge from the weekend of “Unite the Right” rallies in Charlottesville, Va.

Eight months later, Kelly’s iconic photograph from that tragic day has earned him the Pulitzer Prize for Breaking News Photography.

At first glance, the photograph is nearly impossible to make sense of visually or politically. Cars are not supposed to drive into pedestrians; fellow citizens are not supposed to kill each other over political differences. And there’s so much in the frame of the image – so many figures and forms crowded together, most only partially visible – that you can’t take it in all at once.

Pablo Picasso’s 1937 iconic mural “Guernica” might teach us how to interpret this image more closely, and why it is important to do so. Like Kelly’s photograph, “Guernica” conveys a moment of terror through a jumble of forms and fragments that seem to make no sense.

In April 1937, a different sort of “Unite the Right” moment took place in fascist Europe during the destruction of Guernica. At the request of General Franco, the leader of nationalist insurgents in the Spanish Civil War, German and Italian warplanes bombarded the Basque town in northern Spain. Terror rained from the sky: Hundreds of civilians were killed, while military targets were left unscathed.

Days later, as May Day protesters filled the streets of Paris, Pablo Picasso began what would become an anti-war masterpiece.

Pablo Picasso, ‘Guernica’ (1937).
Reina Sofia

There are uncanny echoes of Picasso’s “Guernica” in Kelly’s photograph. Picasso used the Cubist techniques of fragmentation and collage to create a visual cry of anguish at the destruction wrought by men at the controls of war machines.

To make sense of the painting, you must do the work of reassembling what has been rendered apart. Yet you will never make sense of such destruction. You cannot merely glance at this massive painting or take it in all at once; you must stand and look and witness. There is nothing beautiful about it. It refuses to console. However, in the painting’s abstraction – its matte shades of gray, its distorted figures that stand in for the wounded and the dead – there is a kind of mercy toward its viewers and these victims.

If there is any mercy of abstraction in Kelly’s photograph, it is that of time. The image captures the moment in medias res – when the bodies of the men near its center still evoke the beauty of the human form in its wholeness.

Ryan M. Kelly/The Daily Progress

Yet we know the victims are not whole; that is why it hurts to look. The contorted positions of the man in red and white sneakers and the man somersaulting above him make sense only in the realm of sports photography. But this is not a game.

Elsewhere the photograph captures only fragments: arms and hands, legs and feet, heads and faces. Empty shoes on the ground. Sunglasses. A cellphone in midair.

You will never make sense of this image because it makes no sense. (Or, rather, it makes as much sense as racism itself.) Yet to look away risks turning away from the truths it tells. A heavy aspect of our national tragedy is that we seem to lack a president – such as Abraham Lincoln – whose heart might break to see such carnage.

As he kept reworking “Guernica,” Picasso painted over a raised fist he had initially drawn near the center of the canvas. Then – as now – the raised fist is a symbol of solidarity against fascism. It makes an eerie reappearance on two posters in the top third of Kelly’s photograph.

“Guernica” includes small lines resembling newsprint. The Charlottesville photojournalist’s image is also crowded with text; some of it implicates the driver, while other words are a call to action.

Clear as day, there’s the incriminating license plate. No one can deny that this car drove into this crowd, as the colluding European fascists did when they claimed that Guernica had been bombed by Spanish Republican forces.

Then there’s the collage of protest signs and street signs that the neo-Nazi at the wheel didn’t heed: Peace/Black Lives Matter. Solidarity. STOP. LOVE. BLACK LIVES. STOP.

Kelly’s photograph redirects these injunctions to the viewer, who’s left to wonder whether this is what our democracy – or the state of our union – looks like.


The ConversationThis is an updated version of an article originally published on Aug. 17, 2017.

Jennifer Wenzel, Associate Professor of English and Comparative Literature and Middle Eastern, South Asian, and African Studies, Columbia University

This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.

 

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Is Ryan Kelly’s Pulitzer Prize-winning Photograph an American ‘Guernica’?

Photography Ads of Yore: Capitalist Pig

Photography Ads of Yore: Capitalist Pig

The first issue of PDN was published in 1980. It was a simpler time, when the world worried about nuclear annihilation, MTV was a year away from showing its first music video and Instagram’s founder had yet to be born.

To reconnect with our history and the history of our industry, we descended into the dusty catacombs of the PDN archives, brushed away the cobwebs* and found some of those early issues to bring you a look at what was considered cutting edge at the time. You can browse the growing collection of old photography ads here.

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This installment dates back to January, 1985, a time when photographers were evidently coming to terms with the fact that they were capitalists (but the good kind).

*In truth, most of our old issues are neatly arranged on a shelf in a brightly-lit conference room.

 

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Photography Ads of Yore: Capitalist Pig

Andrea Bruce Wins $20K 2018 Anja Niedringhaus Award

Andrea Bruce Wins K 2018 Anja Niedringhaus Award

Photographer Andrea Bruce has won the 2018 Anja Niedringhaus Courage in Photojournalism Award, the International Women’s Media Foundation (IWMF) announced on Saturday. The award comes with a $20,000 prize. Two other photographers—Amber Bracken and Rebecca Conway—won honorable mentions.

Chosen from 136 nominees, Bruce won for her work focusing on people living in the aftermath of war, particularly in Iraq and Afghanistan, the IWMF said in its announcement. “Andrea was selected for her empathy, her emotional connection with subject, and for the dignity that shines through in her portfolio, which also includes images from Syria, Russia, Bahrain, India and Haiti,” the IWMF said.

Bruce recently won a $30,000 Catchlight Fellowship for her current work about democracy in the U.S.

Bracken was recognized for her work documenting the 2016 protests initiated by the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe against the Dakota Access Pipeline. Conway, who is now a photo editor for Agence France-Presse, was recognized for her work documenting the conflict in Kashmir.

The Anja Niedringhaus Award recognizes women journalists who “document crucial stories in challenging environments,” the IWMF says. It was created to honor the life and work of Pulitzer Prize-winning photographer Anja Niedringhaus, who was killed in 2014 while covering elections in Afghanistan.

Related:
Andrea Bruce, Aida Muluneh, Carlos Javier Ortiz Win $30K Catchlight Fellowships

Sinclair Wins $20K 2017 Anja Niedringhaus Award

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Andrea Bruce Wins K 2018 Anja Niedringhaus Award

Christopher Burkett’s Looming Deadline

Christopher Burkett’s Looming Deadline

Christopher Burkett has spent four decades photographing landscapes with a large format film camera. It’s no easy feat. Burkett has to lug the large camera around, struggle with depth of field and battle motion blur.

But Burkett’s biggest challenge is a looming deadline: the moment he runs out of his 10 year supply of Cibachrome paper.

The NewsHour documents Burkett’s work, his printing process and the bittersweet reality that he will soon be closing the lights in his darkroom for the last time.

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Christopher Burkett’s Looming Deadline

Filmmaker/Photographer Graham Dickie Wins 2018 Alexia Student Grant

Filmmaker/Photographer Graham Dickie Wins 2018 Alexia Student Grant

Graham Dickie of Tsinghua University (Beijing)and the University of Texas at Austin has won the 2018 Alexia Student Grant for “How Life Is: Rap in Rural Southeast Louisiana,” a project combining a film and a photo series. The Alexia Foundation announced the news today.

“For the first time, a film received top honors in the student category and that entry also included strong still images. That’s a reflection of how the profession is moving and one we’re proud to reflect,” said jury moderator and Syracuse University photojournalism professor Mike Davis in a prepared statement.

Dickie’s project focuses on hip-hop artists and culture to explore social conditions and build understanding across class and race lines. “Rap is profoundly entwined with life in rural Southeast Louisiana and helps express what it means to be young and black in the South today,” he explained in his grant application.

Dickie, who is pursuing a master’s degree at Tsinghua University, will receive funding for a semester of study at Syracuse University, plus a $1,000 cash grant.

Alexia Student Grant Awards of Excellence went to Jordan Gale of the University of Iowa, Jiang Nan of the London College of Communication, Swastik Pal of Jadavpur Univeristy, and Gabriel Scarlett of Western Kentucky University. Each will receive a $500 cash grant and a $1,500 tuition voucher to attend a workshop at Syracuse University.

Jurors included Washington Post director of photography MaryAnne Golon, photographer Zun Lee, and Visura CEO Adriana Teresa Letorney.

Earlier this week, the jurors award the $20,000 Alexia 2018 Professional Grant to photographer Rena Effendi for her “Spirit Lake” project.

The Alexia Foundation supports photographers working on projects to expose social injustice and affect change.

Related:
Rena Effendi Wins $20K Alexia 2018 Professional Grant

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Filmmaker/Photographer Graham Dickie Wins 2018 Alexia Student Grant

Photography Ads of Yore: Old Hands, New Tricks

Photography Ads of Yore: Old Hands, New Tricks

The first issue of PDN was published in 1980. It was a simpler time, when the world worried about nuclear annihilation, MTV was a year away from showing its first music video and Instagram’s founder had yet to be born.

To reconnect with our history and the history of our photographic tools, we descended into the dusty catacombs of the PDN archives, brushed away the cobwebs* and found some of those early issues to bring you a look at what was considered cutting edge at the time. Our scans make for an interesting and, we hope, entertaining look at older photo technology and the marketing thereof.  You can browse the growing collection of old photography ads here.

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This installment dates back to February 1985, a time when breaking hand habits was frowned upon.

*In truth, most of our old issues are neatly arranged on a shelf in a brightly-lit conference room.

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Photography Ads of Yore: Old Hands, New Tricks

Rena Effendi Wins $20K Alexia 2018 Professional Grant

Rena Effendi Wins K Alexia 2018 Professional Grant

Photographer Rena Effendi has won the $20,000 Alexia 2018 Professional Grant to support her “Spirit Lake” project, the Alexia Foundation announced today. Effendi’s project examines the effects of trauma from recurrent sexual abuse at the Spirit Lake reservation in North Dakota, and community efforts to help victims through traditional healing.

“I feel so very privileged to be offered this opportunity to go back and continue uncovering these important stories buried under layers of stigma,” Effendi told The Washington Post after she won the grant.

Effendi’s project was chosen from among 309 applications for the 2018 grant. Jurors included Washington Post director of photography MaryAnne Golon, photographer Zun Lee, and Visura CEO Adriana Teresa Letorney. Syracuse University Alexia Chair Mike Davis moderated the judging.

The Alexia Foundation was founded to support photographers working on projects to expose social injustice and affect change. Winners of the 2018 Alexia Student Grants will be announced later this week.

Related:
Sarah Blesener Wins $20K Alexia Foundation Professional Grant
Secrets of Successful Grant Writing: Mary F. Calvert
Stephanie Sinclair on Writing Grant Proposals with Personal Appeal

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Rena Effendi Wins K Alexia 2018 Professional Grant

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