photography

This Photography Jacket Was Inspired by the US Military’s M-65 Field Jacket

This Photography Jacket Was Inspired by the US Military’s M-65 Field Jacket

The camera bag brand Langly has unveiled a new weatherproof jacket designed for professional photographers called The Langly Field Jacket. The design was inspired by the US military’s iconic M-1965 (AKA M-65) field jacket.

“Originally developed by the military to function in any climate, the M-65 keeps cool on hot days, warm on cold nights, and dry during monsoons,” Langly says.

The US Military’s M65 field jacket (available at Army Surplus World), the inspiration for the Langly Field Jacket.

The Langly Field Jacket features a wind- and water-resistant outer shell, weatherproof tape-sealed seams, and an adjustable wireframe hood and cuffs.

In designing the jacket, Langly prioritized mobility and comfort: the materials protect you from the elements while still allowing your body to breathe, and the sleeve design provides an unrestricted range of motion without bunching up.

There are also zippered vents under the arms to further increase breathability when things get warm.

In addition to the four reinforced snap-flap pockets on the front, the jacket also features a large number of spaces to store camera gear and accessories. Here’s what it can carry:

Pass-through channels throughout the jacket allow you to snake cables (e.g. headphone and battery charger) between exterior and interior pockets.

The pockets in the jacket are lined with an RFID-blocking material, providing security for your passport, credit cards, and travel documents.

The Langly Field Jacket will be available in three color options (Graphite Black, Dark Forest, and Geo Yellow) and in two configurations: Traveler (the base model with fewer add-ons) and Photographer (which provides the full range of storage features shown above).

Langly has started a new Kickstarter campaign to launch its new jacket, and early supporters can receive one at a discounted price (assuming the project successfully delivers).

The Traveler and Photographer jackets can be “pre-ordered” for $289 and $310 through Kickstarter (the full retail prices will be $399 and $435, respectively) with an estimated delivery date in December 2018.


Source: PetaPixel

This Photography Jacket Was Inspired by the US Military’s M-65 Field Jacket

Perspective Distortion, Or: Why Lens Compression Doesn’t Exist

Perspective Distortion, Or: Why Lens Compression Doesn’t Exist

Here’s an enlightening 7-minute video by Fstoppers that explains why “lens compression” is a misconception that’s actually “perspective distortion”.

Basically, the reason a camera can “add 10 pounds” to a person isn’t due to the focal length of the lens used but rather the distance from the camera to the subject. But since that distance is largely dependent on how large the subject needs to appear in the frame, distortions are often explained as “lens compression.”

“These noticeable differences lead most photographers to believe that wide angle lenses are distorting a scene while telephoto lenses are compressing a scene, but they are overlooking what is actually happening: the camera is moving,” photographer Lee Morris says in the video. “In reality, the distance from the camera to the subject is what is creating these distortions.”

To demonstrate this, Morris shoots two portraits of the same subject, one with a 70mm lens and one with a 15mm lens but cropped to have the same field of view as the 70mm. The two photos have virtually identical perspective distortion.

If you bring the 15mm closer to the subject instead of cropping, the face becomes distorted due to the change in distance.


Source: PetaPixel

Perspective Distortion, Or: Why Lens Compression Doesn’t Exist

People Magazine Once Paid $10,000 for a Photo It Didn’t Even Want

People Magazine Once Paid ,000 for a Photo It Didn’t Even Want

Photographers often reminisce about the glory days of magazines, when they were given huge budgets, freedoms, and paychecks to create images. Here’s one crazy example of what things were like then: People magazine once paid $10,000 for exclusive rights to a photo it didn’t even want… just to keep it away from competitors.

The New York Times has published a fascinating oral history documenting the last days of Time Inc. before the “pre-eminent media organization of the 20th century ended up on the scrap heap.”

Former People assistant managing editor Albert Kim shares how publications would get into crazy bidding wars over celebrity photos, sometimes paying tens of thousands of dollars for them, and sparking tabloid and paparazzi culture.

“Not long into my tenure, there was that famous set of pictures that had Ben Affleck and Jennifer Lopez kissing in a convertible — the first affirmation that they were a couple,” says Kim, who was responsible for approving photo department expenses. “We got into a bidding war with Us Weekly over those pictures and we ended up buying them for $50,000. That’s what triggered everything in tabloid culture and the paparazzi.”

After that $50,000 spend, Kim began spending tens of thousands of dollars every single week to license exclusive celebrity photos from photographers.

“A lot of times I was buying pictures I knew we weren’t going to run, just to keep them out of the hands of our competitors,” Kim says. “I once spent $10,000 on a photo of Eminem and his daughter knowing we wouldn’t use it, but knowing no one else could, either.”

Former Life and TIME editor Dan Okrent says that magazines spent money so loosely simply because they were earning so much, perhaps similar to some ultra-profitable Silicon Valley companies today.

“It seemed as if no one was paying attention to the money that was going out, because there was so much coming in,” Okrent says.

But as advertising dollars moved from print to the Internet, budgets for photography have shriveled up as well.


Source: PetaPixel

People Magazine Once Paid ,000 for a Photo It Didn’t Even Want

Sony Investing $9B in Image Sensors, Aims to Be Top Camera Brand by 2021

Sony Investing B in Image Sensors, Aims to Be Top Camera Brand by 2021

Sony has unveiled a new three-year plan for its business segments under new CEO Kenichiro Yoshida, and it’s clear that one of the company’s primary goals is to dominate digital photography.

The company, already the clear-cut leader in image sensors with a reported 50% market share, is planning to invest 1 trillion yen (~$9 billion) into mostly image sensors over the next three years as companies like Samsung and (now) Canon have begun ramping up their own sensor businesses.

And in a presentation given at Sony IR Day 2018, Sony also stated that one of its mid-range initiatives over the next three years is to “be the top brand in the overall camera market.”

Canon and Nikon are still the heavyweights in the camera industry when it comes to market share, but Sony has made huge inroads in recent years with cameras such as the Sony a9, which just won “Camera of the Year” in Japan.

Now Sony is hoping to overtake the likes of Canon and Nikon by March 31, 2021 as the industry’s “top camera brand,” but it’s unclear what standard Sony is measuring “top” by.

The company also observes that there has been a “revitalization of the mirrorless camera market” — thanks in part to its technological advancements — and that one of the trends in the camera industry is that its competitors are becoming “more aggressive in the market.” Canon and Nikon are both reportedly planning to launch their first full-frame mirrorless cameras within the year.

Sony has experience in making ambitious plans and then achieving those goals. After being hammered by massive losses back in 2012, then-CEO Kazuo Hirai unveiled a “Ony Sony” initiative that aimed to trim unprofitable businesses while focusing on three core “pillar” businesses: digital imaging, gaming, and mobile. Fast forward five years, and Sony announced record profits in late 2017. A few months later, Hirai stepped down as CEO and handed the reins to Yoshida, having accomplished his goals of righting the ship.

(via Sony via sonyalpharumors)


Source: PetaPixel

Sony Investing B in Image Sensors, Aims to Be Top Camera Brand by 2021

Photographer Has Close Encounters with Huge Manta Rays

Photographer Has Close Encounters with Huge Manta Rays

Photographer William Drumm of Denver, Colorado, has been traveling to Socorro Island over the past two years in hopes of swimming and capturing images of the world’s largest manta rays. This 2-minute video shows some of the beautiful encounters Drumm has had.

Caters Clips writes that the shots were captured between October 2017 and April 2018.

The largest manta rays on Earth can reach a whopping 23 feet (7m) in width, or about the length of four humans lined up head to toe.

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Drumm has more photos and videos of manta rays on his Instagram page, and you can also find more of his fantastic photography on his website.

(via Caters Clips via Laughing Squid)


Source: PetaPixel

Photographer Has Close Encounters with Huge Manta Rays

Royal Wedding Photographer Reveals How Viral Photo Was Shot

Royal Wedding Photographer Reveals How Viral Photo Was Shot

The royal wedding of Prince Harry and Meghan Markle captured the world’s attention this past weekend, and one particular photo received a huge amount of praise and viral popularity. Now the photographer has revealed details of how the picture came to be.

The photo above shows Prince Harry, Duke of Sussex and his new bride, the Duchess of Sussex, holding hands in a carriage during a procession after their wedding ceremony.

Shortly after it emerged, it began going wildly viral online:

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Photojournalist Yui Mok, a Press Association (PA) staff photographer, soon identified himself as the person responsible for the image. Drones weren’t allowed anywhere near the wedding celebrations, so for this “aerial” shot, Mok actually positioned himself on the roof of a gateway at Windsor Castle to photograph the couple as they passed below.

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Mok was using a Canon 1D X Mark II DSLR and a Canon 70-200mm lens.

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Observers noticed that the couple forms a heart shape in the frame, but Mok says this was purely coincidental and not something he noticed while shooting.

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Mok also credited the photo editors at the PA picture desk for cropping and tidying up the raw photo that he rushed over.

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Mok says he never expected the photo to become so popular, that it has been shared widely on the Internet without credit, and that he gets paid a salary by PA regardless of how viral his photos get.

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Mok is getting his fair share of attention now as his photo goes viral, and it will go down as one of the memorable images made of a wedding watched by millions upon millions of people around the world.


Image credits: Header photo by Yui Mok — WPA Pool/Getty Images


Source: PetaPixel

Royal Wedding Photographer Reveals How Viral Photo Was Shot

A $5 Shower Curtain Does Wonders for Diffusing Light

A Shower Curtain Does Wonders for Diffusing Light

Here’s a 6-minute educational video by Shutterstock in which filmmaker Todd Blankenship discusses the basics of diffusing light and introduces three cheap options for doing so… including a $5 shower curtain.

“A common misconception about diffusion is that all you need to do is slap [diffusion] onto the front of your light source,” Blankenship says. But if you do this, the results may not show much of a difference — the light may still be nearly just as harsh without improved quality.

But the trick is to make your light source as big as possible in relation to your subject, Blankenship says.

The three diffusion products suggested are a $180 Fotodiox Pro-Studio Solutions 4×4 Frame, a $110 roll of Opal Frost Diffusion, a $5 shower curtain.

“You’ll be pretty amazed by how beautiful a quality of light you can get using a shower curtain diffusion,” Blankenship says, noting that it’s one of his favorite ways to diffuse light.

(via Shutterstock Tutorials via ISO 1200)


Source: PetaPixel

A Shower Curtain Does Wonders for Diffusing Light

Tornado Forms in Front of a Timelapse Photographer’s Camera

Tornado Forms in Front of a Timelapse Photographer’s Camera

It’s extremely difficult to predict when and where a tornado will form and touch down, so stormchasing photographers rely on long days of chasing and waiting for luck. But luck is exactly what Mike Olbinski met with recently: he captured a tornado forming and touching down while shooting a timelapse.

The 1-minute video above, titled “The Tescott Tornado,” shows Olbinski’s lucky break.

“The 2018 storm chasing season has been a tough one… long days with not much reward,” Olbinski writes. But on May 1st, that all changed.

While chasing supercells in the plains of Kansas, Olbinski set up his camera gear (two Canon 5DS R DSLRs with a Canon 11-24mm f/4 and 50mm f/1.2) near Culver City to get a nice view of the storm’s structure before it got too close.

“But as we sat there…tornado sirens went off in town (which is what you hear at the start of the video),” the photographer writes. “We noticed a wall cloud forming… and then a cone tornado dropped right before our eyes. I couldn’t believe my luck with time-lapsing it before it ever started.

“And then the tornado disappeared into the rain, only to come back out as a full wedge tornado that was later rated EF3. Watching it sping across the horizon was a moment I won’t soon forget.”

The massive tornado was about half-a-mile wide, but it missed hitting a city. Thankfully, despite destroying some structures, the tornado didn’t cause any injuries or deaths.

“It was an amazing moment, I somehow was lucky enough to capture the entire tornado lifecycle, from wall cloud to cone, to wedge and then fading into rain where I believe it did die out at some point,” Olbinski says. “Best tornado footage I’ve captured on time-lapse and it’s the highlight of the spring so far!”


Source: PetaPixel

Tornado Forms in Front of a Timelapse Photographer’s Camera

The 5 Best Nikon Full Frame Lenses: Kai Wong’s Picks

The 5 Best Nikon Full Frame Lenses: Kai Wong’s Picks

Here’s a 16-minute video in which Kai Wong shares his latest list of the 5 best full frame lenses worth investing in if you’re a Nikon DSLR shooter.

Here’s the list of Wong’s picks (watch the video to hear his intro and explanation for each choice):

#1. Nikon 70-200mm f/2.8 FL — $4,000

#2. Nikon 58mm f/1.4 — $1,600

#3. Nikon 85mm f/1.4G — $1,600

#4. Nikon 105mm f/1.4 E — $2,200

#5. Nikon 180-400mm f/4 E TC — $12,400

As a set, this group of 5 lenses would cost you a grand total of about $21,800. Shooting with some of the best lenses Nikon has to offer definitely doesn’t come cheap.


Source: PetaPixel

The 5 Best Nikon Full Frame Lenses: Kai Wong’s Picks

Mom’s Multi-Million Lawsuit: Photog Posted Indecent Photo of Girl at Dance

Mom’s Multi-Million Lawsuit: Photog Posted Indecent Photo of Girl at Dance

A Georgia mother is filing a multi-million-dollar lawsuit against a local photographer’s photo company, accusing it of publishing an indecent photo of her 15-year-old daughter at a school dance.

The Associated Press reports that the Cady Studios had been hired to photograph the North Cobb High School homecoming dance in September 2017, which the girl attended.

One of the photos shot that night was captured at the moment the teen’s dress slipped down, exposing her right breast.

Months later, in January 2018, the girl came across that photo posted for sale on the photo studio’s website and was “shocked, horrified and embarrassed” that it was online for her schoolmates to see. Some, including a group of football players at the school, purportedly even spread it through social media apps such as Snapchat and made “hurtful comments”.

Cady Studios took down the photo after the girl’s family reported it, and a manager at the studio sent an apology over email.

“I am horrified that this even happened,” the manager wrote. “Please know I am addressing with our team immediately. We have a process of three people to review photos prior to posting; however, we are investigating where the breakdown happened.”

The mother — unnamed to protect the girl’s identity — responded this week by filing a lawsuit accusing Cady Studios of “negligence and intentional infliction of emotional distress, pain and suffering.”

The lawsuit is seeking punitive damages against the photo studio and says the girl was so embarrassed she couldn’t go to school the day after the photo spread, and that she has since been in therapy.

If you’re an event photographer who regularly shoots groups of people and posts large galleries online, this story may be a wakeup call on the importance of thoroughly inspecting your photos prior to sharing them publicly.


Source: PetaPixel

Mom’s Multi-Million Lawsuit: Photog Posted Indecent Photo of Girl at Dance