photography

Yashica’s ‘Unexpected’ Y35 Camera is Worse Than Anyone Expected

Yashica’s ‘Unexpected’ Y35 Camera is Worse Than Anyone Expected

The Japanese brand Yashica stirred up a great deal of excitement in the photo world in 2017 by teasing its return to the camera industry. In October 2017, it unveiled the Yashica Y35 digiFilm camera and raised over $1 million on Kickstarter. Backers are now receiving their cameras, and the initial reaction has been overwhelmingly negative.

Yashica’s many teasers for the Y35 camera told photographers to “expect the unexpected.” The camera turned out to be a minimalist digital camera that features pretend rolls of film that are used to choose your photo style, aspect ratio, and ISO combinations (instead of being able to do so in-camera).

While the concept may be novel and fun for people yearning for the look and feel of film cameras while having the convenience of digital, execution appears to have been lacking.

The Phoblographer reports that the project was the result of a Hong Kong-based company that picked up the iconic brand name, and that the Kickstarter campaign is now getting flooded with comments from many of the 6,935 backers who are seriously disappointed with the camera they received.

Of the nearly 4,000 comments that have been posted to the campaign page, a huge number are reports of poor build quality and badly thought out design details.

Here are some of the issues and complaints being shared:

  • The camera turns off when the shutter is pressed
  • The camera doesn’t even turn on
  • The camera is plastic and cheaply made
  • Camera parts are breaking and falling off
  • Fake buttons molded into the plastic just for looks
  • The camera is hard to hold while pressing the shutter
  • Many backers have yet to receive their cameras and haven’t had any updates on the status
  • Awful image quality comparable to cheap toy cameras for kids
  • Incorrect labeling on the fake film rolls, resulting in mismatched photo styles
  • Black-and-white photos coming out blue
  • An unreliable shutter button that doesn’t always trigger a photo when pressed
  • The shutter takes photos on the way up instead of when its fully pressed down
  • A shutter button so stiff that it’s unusable
  • The winding lever gets jammed and needs to be manually pushed back
  • Stickers on the camera have bubbles and are defective
  • Photos can’t be found after they’re captured
  • Difficulty inserting digiFilm rolls into the camera
  • Removing the lens cover caused the lens to separate from the camera body
  • An included cable that isn’t compatible with the camera
  • Photos are out of focus and distorted

The general sentiment seems to be that backers were expecting a faithful revival of the famous Yashica brand, but were instead surprised when they received a cheap and unreliable plastic camera with the brand name featured on the front. The price tag of $150+ also makes the failings of the camera difficult for backers to stomach.

Even though cameras are being delivered to backers, many commenters are still calling the project a “scam” for misrepresenting what the camera would be like. The company behind the campaign was responding to individual comments days ago, but it appears to have gone completely silent as more and more complaints are posted.

“Expect the unexpected,” “Yashica” said. Unfortunately, supporters probably weren’t expecting a camera that’s so unexpectedly bad.


Source: PetaPixel

Yashica’s ‘Unexpected’ Y35 Camera is Worse Than Anyone Expected

Sony Beats Canon EOS R and Nikon Z7 in Dynamic Range

Sony Beats Canon EOS R and Nikon Z7 in Dynamic Range

Photonstophotos has published its dynamic range test results for the new Canon EOS R and Nikon Z7 full-frame mirrorless cameras. The numbers show that both Canon and Nikon trail the performance of Sony’s cameras.

Here’s the comparison chart by Photonstophotos:

At ISO 100, the Sony a7R III has a Photographic Dynamic Range (PDR) of 11.64, the Nikon Z7 is 10.98, and the Canon EOS R is in last with 10.6. The Nikon Z7 does have a lower native minimum ISO of 64, but even there it has a PDR of 11.56, which still trails the Sony score at ISO 100.

At base ISO, Canon’s EOS R (10.6) is closer in dynamic range performance to the APS-C Sony a6500 (10.31) than to the full-frame Sony a7R III (11.64).

At ISO 25600 (the max native ISO of the Z7 — the Sony goes to ISO 32000 and Canon has ISO 40000), Sony scores 4.34, Nikon is measured at 4.25, and Canon is 3.85.

What’s interesting about these test results is that Sony is the world’s leading image sensor manufacturer right now in quantity (and arguably quality), Nikon uses Nikon-designed/Sony-manufactured sensors in pro-grade cameras such as the D850 (and perhaps the Z7?), and Canon makes its own sensors and only recently began selling them to third parties.

“[K]eep in mind the Canon and Nikon cameras are the newest cameras meaning that the gap is expected to increase once Sony announces the new models,” sonyalpharumors writes.

Despite the apparent differences in scores, however, this test also shows that all three cameras have very similar dynamic range performance that’s in line of what’s expected of top full-frame cameras — the numbers above are all better than or equal to pretty much all cameras on the market, so don’t read too deeply into them.


Source: PetaPixel

Sony Beats Canon EOS R and Nikon Z7 in Dynamic Range

Adobe MovingStills Creates Realistic Camera Moves in Still Photos

Adobe MovingStills Creates Realistic Camera Moves in Still Photos

At the ongoing Adobe MAX 2018 conference, Adobe is showing off some sneak peeks of features being developed for the Creative Cloud. One of them is MovingStills, which lets you add realistic camera moves to any still photograph, bringing it to life.

The idea is to use artificial intelligence to intelligently create parallax based on what’s found in a photo, turning it into a faux video shot with a moving camera.

Here’s what an ordinary “zoom” into a 2D photo looks like without any special technology:

“The result is not very impressive,” the presenter says. “It looks quite flat and there’s no illusion of depth, there’s no parallax. It’s not quite like a real video.”

By developing a feature that understands how the things in the photo are arranged in 3D space, a much more realistic result is possible.

In addition to single click animation to bring photos to life, allowing MovingStills to select the optimal camera path, you can also choose between different camera paths to produce different effects.

The view control interface lets you specify the view you’d like the shot to start with and the camera view at the end, and the AI will fill in the motion in between the two camera “positions.”

Finally, since the feature can be so hands-off, an entire album of photos can be quickly turned into “moving stills.”

No word yet on when MovingStills will be included in a Creative Cloud app update.


Source: PetaPixel

Adobe MovingStills Creates Realistic Camera Moves in Still Photos

KiiPix is a $40 Analog Instax Printer for Smartphone Photos

KiiPix is a Analog Instax Printer for Smartphone Photos

Holga’s recently-announced Holga Printer will let you turn smartphone photos into Instax prints without needing a battery, but that printer will cost at least $48 and won’t arrive until after March 2019. KiiPix is a $40 analog printer that’s essentially the same, and it’s already available.

The designs of the two printers are strangely similar — it’s unclear whether the Holga Printer is simply a rebranded version of the KiiPix product.

Using KiiPix is also super simple: open the printer up, make sure there’s film inside, place your phone on the holder, and print by pressing the lever on the side. Once your print has been exposed, a hand-cranked knob on the side of the printer is used to manually eject the print.

These printers are essentially compact pinhole cameras that allow you to expose your smartphone display onto Instax film.

Turning your brightness all the way up ensures that enough light is collected while the print is being made. A mirror on the surface of the printer lets you align your phone screen while it’s pointed down.

The KiiPix can fold up compactly when not in use. And since it doesn’t require any kind of battery or cable, it’s a pocket printer that can be taken everywhere.

Here’s a 1-minute video that introduces KiiPix:

KiiPix is a product of the Japanese company Tomy. After launching in July 2018, it quickly became a top 10 product in Amazon’s portable printer category.

KiiPix is available in Cherry Blossom, Sky Blue, and Jet Black and can be purchased for $40 from Amazon.


Source: PetaPixel

KiiPix is a Analog Instax Printer for Smartphone Photos

Sony HX99 is a Tiny Camera with 28x Optical Zoom and 4K Video

Sony HX99 is a Tiny Camera with 28x Optical Zoom and 4K Video

Sony has announced the new Cyber-shot HX99, what the company calls “the world’s smallest travel high zoom camera.” The camera features a powerful 28x zoom and 4K video recording.

At the core of the camera is an 18.2-megapixel backside-illuminated 1/2.3-inch Exmore R CMOS sensor with an ISO range of 80-12800 and 10fps continuous shooting.

On the front of the camera is a 24-720mm (35mm equiv.) zoom lens with 28x optical zoom. Clear Image Zoom provides digital zoom up to 1440mm.

The features of the camera are unusual considering its size: measuring just 4×2.3×1.4 inches (10.2×5.81×3.55cm) and weighing just 8.54oz (242g), the HX99 is “the world’s smallest camera body of its kind,” Sony says. By kind, Sony means fixed-lens cameras with a built-in viewfinder and a maximum telephoto focal length greater than 700mm (35mm equivalent).

The top and back of the camera have a retractable OLED Tru-Finder electronic viewfinder and a 180-degree tiltable LCD screen.

For video recording, the HX99 can shoot 4K with full pixel readout and no pixel binning. Drop down to HD resolution can you can shoot up to 120fps for slow-motion sequences.

Other features and specs of the HX99 include Optical SteadyShot image stabilization, Zoom Assist (a temporary zoom-out display to show a wider area when shooting far subjects), 0.09 autofocus, Eye AF, RAW photos, Touch Focus, Touch Shutter, Touch Pad, a customizable Control Ring, and Bluetooth connectivity.

The Sony Cyber-shot HX99 will be available in early November 2018 with a price tag of $450.


Source: PetaPixel

Sony HX99 is a Tiny Camera with 28x Optical Zoom and 4K Video

Insta360 ONE X is a 5.7K 360° Action Cam with ‘Impossible’ Stabilization

Insta360 ONE X is a 5.7K 360° Action Cam with ‘Impossible’ Stabilization

A year after announcing the ONE camera for 4K 360-degree shooting, Insta360 is now back with the ONE X for 5.7K 360-degree shooting.

Compatible with both iOS and Android, the ONE X is designed to “give users more freedom and more creative possibilities – both during and after capture.”

The camera features “gimbal-level” stabilization using Insta360’s 6-axis gyroscopic stabilization and FlowState stabilization algorithm, which analyzes movement in all directions to provide a powerful stabilization.

“FlowState lets users capture impossibly smooth video with no accessories needed,” Insta360 says. “Mount the ONE X anywhere – from a helmet to a selfie stick to a kayak – and footage comes out looking like it’s been professionally stabilized.”

5.7K footage can be shot at 30fps. There are also new 50fps and 100fps frame rates if you drop down to 4K and 3K resolution, respectively. And in addition to videos, the ONE X can shoot 18-megapixel JPEG or DNG RAW photos with great low-light performance. ISO, exposure value, white balance, and shutter speed can be manually adjusted.

After capturing footage, users can use the ONE X’s editing app to reframe and re-edit the best parts of scenes, creating cinematic clips from the original 360-degree views.

A new TimeShift feature lets you adjust the playback speed of different parts of clips, from cinematic slow motion to sped-up hyperlapses. The Bullet Time feature that was introduced in the original ONE now has a wider field of view and 3K resolution in the ONE X.

When mounted on a selfie stick, the ONE X can automatically edit the stick out of scenes, making the resulting footage look like it was shot by a low-flying drone.

Insta360 has created a new Drifter camera “dart” that’s designed to help you capture aerial footage with your ONE X by throwing it. Simply snap your camera into the dart and start hurling it around. The resulting Drift Shots are 360-degree aerial slow-motion shots.

Other features and specs of the ONE X include 5.8GHz Wi-Fi for transfers and previews, HDR shooting, Lightning/USB-Type-C/Micro-USB cable support, a removable 1200mAh battery, two optional rugged case options (a tough Venture Case and an underwater Dive Case), and an optional GPS Smart Remote.

The Insta360 ONE X is available starting October 17th with a price tag of $400.


Source: PetaPixel

Insta360 ONE X is a 5.7K 360° Action Cam with ‘Impossible’ Stabilization

The iPhone XS vs a Cinema Camera: Can You Tell the Difference?

The iPhone XS vs a Cinema Camera: Can You Tell the Difference?

As a filmmaker, I come across many different types of cameras, lenses, and of course all the peripherals that come with movie making. For commercial shoots I am currently shooting on a Canon C200 cinema camera using the Canon RAW lite codec. The results are incredible.

A few weeks ago I picked up the new iPhone XS max and as a photographer and film maker the first thing I did was open up the camera app to see how it looked. To be honest, I was actually shocked. It looked awesome.

Over the next few days I took a few videos and found myself actually watching them back on the phone and being pretty impressed. I would then watch a video I shot on the C200 and to be honest I would question which one I liked more. So that was it, I just had to test them out.

It was pretty simple. I stripped back the C200 to the body the Sigma 18-35mm f/1.8 Art as this gave me a pretty similar focal length to the wide lens on the iPhone. I attached the iPhone XS to the top of the C200 and placed them both on the DJI Ronin-S (I cant believe I actually got this balanced). I used the regular Apple camera app and spend an hour shooting to see what I could come up with.

Back at may studio (In Color Studios), I put the footage together and threw on a color grade. The iPhone footage took almost no work to color grade whereas the C200 to a lot of heavy lifting which is one of the joys of shooting in RAW.

When viewed the footage on a small iPhone scene they both looked fantastic. I was impressed to say the least but it all fell apart when viewing in fullscreen on my 27-inch iMac. Too much sharpening meant the details just got lost and all the leaves with details just got smushed together. The C200 still looked great. You can see the results for yourself in the video.

The dynamic range of the iPhone XS is super impressive. It’s able to keep the highlights on the bright sun while keeping details in the shadows. This is some crazy multiple exposure processing that’s been done. Considering this is all being done in real time in the palm of your hand, it’s super impressive.

In conclusion, the iPhone camera is a smartphone camera and always will be. It is incredibly small but gives completely mind-blowing results. If you are shooting to video that is intended to be viewed on a smartphone and you don’t want to do any post processing then the files strait from the app are impressive. Apple has done a great job of optimizing the output to make the files look great instantly.

Does it come close to a cinema camera? Not at all. Is it as good as a cinema camera, not at all. Is it the best camera I have ever seen on a smartphone? 100%.


About the author: Ed Gregory is a photographer and the founder of Photos in Color. The opinions expressed in this article are solely those of the author. Gregory teaches tutorials on Photoshop, Lightroom, and photography, and you can find more of his videos on his YouTube channel. This article was also published here.


Source: PetaPixel

The iPhone XS vs a Cinema Camera: Can You Tell the Difference?

Google Unveils the Pixel 3 and 3XL with New AI Camera Features

Google Unveils the Pixel 3 and 3XL with New AI Camera Features

Google has unveiled the new Pixel 3 and Pixel 3XL smartphones. The new generation of Pixel phones features an improved camera that’s backed by Google’s AI.

The Pixel 3 features a 5.5-inch screen and the 3XL has a 6.3-inch screen. On the back of the phones is a 12.2MP 28mm f/1.8 (35mm equiv.) dual-pixel camera.

A new feature called Top Shot uses AI to capture alternate shots in HDR+ and then recommend the best one from the sequence, which you can flip through and select a photo from yourself.

The zoom is now aided by a Super Res Zoom feature, which uses computation photography from the world of astronomy and scientific imaging to provide sharper details when you’re zooming.

When shooting in low-light environments, an upcoming feature called Night Sight will help you shoot natural-looking photos without the aid of a flash. The feature combines multiple exposures to create low-light photos with less noise and more detail.

The fronts of the phones now have two separate cameras: an 8MP 28mm f/1.8 (35mm equiv.) standard one and an 8MP 19mm f/2.2 (35mm equiv.) wide-angle one. For selfies, a feature called Group Selfie provides 184% more room in the photo while shooting with the wide-angle camera.

Like the new iPhone XS and XS Max, the new Google Pixel 3 and Pixel 3XL allow you to adjust the blurriness of the background after shooting Portrait Mode photos. In addition to tweaking the depth of field, you can even select a different focus point after the photo is captured.

Other new camera features include a Photobooth mode (AI that snaps photos when it detects facial expressions), selective color mode, a Playground mode for playful photos (with stickers and captions), and super smooth video (with Motion Auto Focus and front-facing video stabilization).

Here are some official sample photos captured with the new Pixel 3:

All photos and videos are given unlimited Google Photos cloud storage at their original resolutions.

Non-photo features and specs of the phones include Google Lens, Smart Composite in Gmail, Google Assistant (the AI can now handle real-world tasks like calling restaurants to book a table), AI call screening, wireless charging, IP68 water- and dust-resistance, Android 9 Pie, a secure custom-designed Titan M chip, Qualcomm Snapdragon 845, 4GB RAM, and a 2915 mAh battery.

The Google Pixel 3 and Pixel 3XL are available for pre-order now from Verizon, Project Fi, and the Google Store unlocked. Colors are Clearly White, Just Black, and Not Pink.


Source: PetaPixel

Google Unveils the Pixel 3 and 3XL with New AI Camera Features

ADOX HR-50 is a New Monochrome Film for 35mm, 120, and 4×5

ADOX HR-50 is a New Monochrome Film for 35mm, 120, and 4×5

ADOX, the world’s oldest photographic materials manufacturer, has announced a new monochrome film called HR-50 that will be available in 35mm, 120, and 4×5 formats.

The ADOX brand has been on photochemical products since 1860, making it the oldest brand that’s still around today. And the company wants to ensure that film photography doesn’t go anywhere.

ADOX says HR-50 was originally a high-resolution film that was used for technical applications. By making modifications to give the film “Speed Boost” technology, the company has converted it into a usable film for ordinary photography.

The sensitivity of the film has been increased to 50 ISO and contrast has been reduced so that the film can be processed using ordinary developers. The grain of the film is “ultrafine,” and it’s sensitive to all wavelengths of visible light.

“The HR-50 is ideal for cityscapes or travel photography,” ADOX writes. There’s also a new ADOX filter that can be used to shoot infrared photography with the film. For portraiture, ADOX recommends a special developer called HR-50 DEV that it designed specifically for the film.

Here are some sample photos captured on ADOX HR-50:

No word yet on when or where ADOX HR-50 will be available or how much it will cost when it is.

(via ADOX via DPReview)


Source: PetaPixel

ADOX HR-50 is a New Monochrome Film for 35mm, 120, and 4×5

Windows 10 Update Pulled After Users Report Deleted Photos and Files

Windows 10 Update Pulled After Users Report Deleted Photos and Files

Microsoft has paused the rollout of its latest Windows 10 update after users reported that photos and other personal files had been wiped without warning by the latest version of the operating system.

The Windows 10 October 2018 Update (version 1809) was made available on October 2nd but hadn’t yet been pushed through Windows’ automatic update system. Some people who chose to install it through Windows Update soon reported that their personal documents folders had been wiped clean. Photos, videos, music, documents, and other files were nowhere to be found.

Microsoft responded on October 4th by pulling the update for further investigation into the bug.

“We have paused the rollout of the Windows 10 October 2018 Update (version 1809) for all users as we investigate isolated reports of users missing some files after updating,” Microsoft writes.

If you installed the update and were stunned to find your photos wiped, Microsoft says you should “minimize your use of the affected device” and immediately call the company for help directly at 1-800-MICROSOFT.

https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js

Microsoft support technicians “have the tools to get you back to a good state,” Windows Insider Program lead Dona Sarkar tweets.

Based on that statement, it appears that the deleted files may be recoverable, but it’s definitely a good idea to refrain from using the computer further to ensure that things don’t get overwritten and lost forever.


Source: PetaPixel

Windows 10 Update Pulled After Users Report Deleted Photos and Files