photography

Fujifilm Acros 100 Film to be Killed Off in October 2018, Report Says

Fujifilm Acros 100 Film to be Killed Off in October 2018, Report Says

It may soon be time to say goodbye to another popular film among analog photographers. A new report is saying that Fujifilm’s Neopan 100 Acros will be discontinued in October of this year.

Casual Photophile reports that the news comes from translations of documents that were distributed to film dealers in Japan.

“As of this writing, consumers and US-based distributors haven’t seen any direct announcement from Fuji and my requests for confirmation from Fuji have not yet been answered,” Casual Photophile writes. “That said, this is technically a rumor, but these sources should be reliable and this follows a historically consistent pattern.”

Fujifilm has been slowly winding down a number of its film lines (and branded film emulsions such as Agfa Vista) in recent years while its Instax film has been booming. The discontinuation of 4×5 Acros 100 was announced in late 2017 and will take place in May 2018, and now it seems that the 35mm and 120 versions of the same film will be meeting the same fate, putting an end to the Acros line completely.

Fujifilm Neopan 100 Acros. Photo by Markus Winkler, markuswinkler.de, License CC-BY

Fujifilm Neopan 100 Acros is a professional ortho-panchromatic (i.e. reduced red sensitivity while being sensitive to all wavelengths of visible light) black-and-white film that’s praised for its sharpness and grain.

“The film is particularly suited for night and long exposure photography due to its reciprocity characteristics,” Wikipedia states. “[I]t does not require adjustments for exposures shorter than 120 seconds, and only requires a ½ stop of compensation for exposures between 120 and 1000 seconds.”

Due to its popularity, the apparent imminent demise of Acros will be a heavy blow to film photographers. If Acros is among your favorite film stocks, now might be a good time to start stocking up.


Source: PetaPixel

Fujifilm Acros 100 Film to be Killed Off in October 2018, Report Says

NiSi Prosories P1 Brings Square Filters to Smartphones

NiSi Prosories P1 Brings Square Filters to Smartphones

The Chinese optical accessory company NiSi has launched a new line of smartphone optical accessories called Prosories. The new Prosories P1 is a kit that brings a number of square filters to the smartphone.

The kid revolves around a special filter holder and smartphone clip. Rotate the holder onto the clip to install it, and then mount the clip over your smartphone camera lens (the clip fits most phone models).

The P1 set includes a medium graduated neutral density (GND) filter and a polarizing filter. The filters are both made of optical glass and feature a nano coating on the surface that reduces ghosting and flare. Each one easily slides into the holder.

The filter holder can be turned freely for choosing the orientation of the filters.

The GND filter can help properly expose both the sky and the foreground in landscape shots.

No filter (left) and with both filters (right). Photo by Maurizio Casula.

The polarizer helps reduce reflection and glare.

Here’s a 2-minute video that introduces the Prosories P1 kit:

The NiSi Prosories P1 costs $40 and can be pre-ordered through the NiSi website. The company estimates that shipping will begin by March 31st, 2018.

(via NiSi via DigitalRev)


Source: PetaPixel

NiSi Prosories P1 Brings Square Filters to Smartphones

This Camera Was Lost at Sea for 2 Years — Its Photos Just Led to Its Owner

This Camera Was Lost at Sea for 2 Years — Its Photos Just Led to Its Owner

An amazing story of one camera’s incredible journey has emerged over in Asia. The Canon camera was lost at sea for over two years before it was recently discovered, and the owner has just been found thanks to the photos within.

A group of schoolchildren was working to clean up a beach in northern Taiwan on Monday when an 11-year-old boy discovered an object that was almost completely covered in barnacles.

It was a waterproof camera housing, and inside was a fully-functioning Canon G12 digital camera that immediately powered on — the batteries inside still held a charge,

The teacher, Park Lee, then looked through the camera and discovered photos of a woman on vacation and locations in Japan.

Several details emerged. The last photo was captured on September 7th, 2015. The owner appeared to be Japanese and someone who was on Ishigaki Island in Japan.

She then decided to turn to Facebook to try and locate the owner of the camera.

“Is it possible to find the owner of a camera floating in the sea?” Lee wrote, providing details of photos discovered on the memory card. “It seems a bit unethical to peek at other people’s camera photos. However, as a result of our discussion, if we could take a look at the photos, would there be any clues for us to find the owner of the camera to return him? So we watched the photos together quickly in the whole class […]”

The post went viral and was shared tens of thousands of times by people around the world.

Yesterday, less than 48 hours after the original Facebook post, the owner was identified after a friend noticed her in the photos. Her name is Serina Tsubakihara, and she’s a 3rd-year student at Sophia University in Tokyo. It turns out Tsubakihara was vacationing in September 2015 on Ishigaki, 155 miles east of Taiwan, when she dropped her camera while scuba diving.

The camera traveled 155 miles west to the shores of Taiwan and was discovered over two years later this week. It’s now on its way back to her.

(via Park Lee via Photoblog.hk)


Source: PetaPixel

This Camera Was Lost at Sea for 2 Years — Its Photos Just Led to Its Owner

A Landscape Shooter’s Guide to Back Button Focus and Hyperfocal Distance

A Landscape Shooter’s Guide to Back Button Focus and Hyperfocal Distance

Want to learn how to shoot tack-sharp landscape photos? Photographer Dave Morrow made this solid 27-minute guide that teaches his personal focusing strategy. He believes it’s the “most in-depth guide to back button focus and hyperfocal distance currently on YouTube.”

Back button autofocus allows you to separate your focusing from your shutter button, moving it to a dedicated button on the back of your camera. We’ve shared some guides on this strategy over the past few years.

Hyperfocal distance is “the closest distance at which a lens can be focused while keeping objects at infinity acceptably sharp.” This allows you to achieve the greatest depth of field and maximize sharpness for objects that are both near and far in the scene.

Morrow has also written up a great tutorial on depth of field that pairs nicely with this video.


Source: PetaPixel

A Landscape Shooter’s Guide to Back Button Focus and Hyperfocal Distance

First Photos Shot on Kodak’s Rebooted TMAX P3200 Film

First Photos Shot on Kodak’s Rebooted TMAX P3200 Film

Lead by spunky frontgirl Ashley Miles, Vinyl Rhino is my favorite cover band in Frederick, Maryland. For years, they’ve rocked our bars with high energy hits from the 80’s to what’s current. Saturday night they stopped by Champions and blew the roof off the place. I was there to capture it on the newly re-released Kodak TMAX P3200.

Concerts are a perfect subject for the new Kodak TMAX P3200. The film allows you to stop down in dim light and get the most performance from your lens, which is important when your grain is as big and chunky as is par for the course with 3200 ISO films.

Vinyl Rhino © 2018 Johnny Martyr | Leica M6 TTL .85 | Leitz 90mm Summicron Pre-ASPH | Kodak TMAX P3200 | Kodak HC110b

I left my shutter at 125 most of the show and racked between about f2.8 and 5.6 as the stage lights blinked and flashed.

Vinyl Rhino © 2018 Johnny Martyr | Leica M6 TTL .85 | Leitz 5cm 1.5 Summarit | Kodak TMAX P3200 | Kodak HC110b

I rated the new P3200 at box speed, 3200 ISO. And as is customary with print film, I overexposed by half a stop to get more detail in the shadows which can fall away quickly in hard stage lighting.

Vinyl Rhino © 2018 Johnny Martyr | Leica M6 TTL .85 | Leitz 90mm Summicron Pre-ASPH | Kodak TMAX P3200 | Kodak HC110b

As usual, Vinyl Rhino put on an amazing show. The band looked and sounded like they were truly having a blast too, which always makes the music that much sweeter.

Vinyl Rhino © 2018 Johnny Martyr | Leica M6 TTL .85 | Leitz 90mm Summicron Pre-ASPH | Kodak TMAX P3200 | Kodak HC110b
Vinyl Rhino © 2018 Johnny Martyr | Leica M6 TTL .85 | Leitz 90mm Summicron Pre-ASPH | Kodak TMAX P3200 | Kodak HC110b

Singer Ashley and bassist Nick were very animated, making them very challenging to photograph with an all manual film camera. When shooting concerts on film you just have to be confident that you got the last shot and concentrate on getting everything right on the next one, else you’ll be moving too slowly to catch the right moments. Sometimes you know you got a stray arm covering a face or an “in between expression,” but you just have to throw it away in your mind and wind that advance lever.

Vinyl Rhino © 2018 Johnny Martyr | Leica M6 TTL .85 | Leitz 5cm 1.5 Summarit | Kodak TMAX P3200 | Kodak HC110b
Vinyl Rhino © 2018 Johnny Martyr | Leica M6 TTL .85 | Leitz 90mm Summicron Pre-ASPH | Kodak TMAX P3200 | Kodak HC110b

I think my favorite piece from their set was their signature fusion of Whitney Houston’s I Wanna Dance With Somebody and Cyndi Lauper’s Girls Just Wanna Have Fun. The Wanna Dance side got the crowd jumping while lyrics were mainly handled by Nick as he hopped around with his Fender bass. Then Ashley started in with a rockier version of the Lauper classic. Her vocals felt like a rebel yell which the ladies in the audience immediately keyed into with strained singalongs and glimmering ringed hands in the air.

Vinyl Rhino © 2018 Johnny Martyr | Leica M6 TTL .85 | Leitz 5cm 1.5 Summarit | Kodak TMAX P3200 | Kodak HC110b

I started out with my Leitz 50mm f/1.5 Summarit but never took it to full aperture where it softens considerably. Despite being designed in the 1940’s, it has a stunning clarity when stopped down. When shooting with grainy film, using a very sharp lens can help offset that muddiness that can occur when soft glass and the big T-Grain clusters collide. The out of focus areas become something of an emotional affair!

Vinyl Rhino © 2018 Johnny Martyr | Leica M6 TTL .85 | Leitz 5cm 1.5 Summarit | Kodak TMAX P3200 | Kodak HC110b
Vinyl Rhino © 2018 Johnny Martyr | Leica M6 TTL .85 | Leitz 90mm Summicron Pre-ASPH | Kodak TMAX P3200 | Kodak HC110b

Then I got tight with my Leitz 90mm f/2 Pre-Asph Summicron. This Canadian-built predecessor to the current 90 Cron was the first compact Leica 90 Summicron and the optics are just incredible, 5 elements in 4 groups. But what’s neat about this otherwise very modern lens is that the front element is only single coated. So while it can be clinically sharp, even with the built-in hood extended, you can still get some flare character. Particularly with harsh stage light. A little bit of flaring, I think, looks nice on a grainy emulsion. It sort of highlights the depth and physicality of the film.

When it came time to process, I used my go-to developer Kodak HC110, Dilution B. Kodak kindly furnished me with a new datasheet but it appears to be identical to the old P3200. 10 minutes at 68 degrees Fahrenheit for 3200 or 12 minutes for 6400. Though I shot at box speed, I decided to process for 6400 as I recall processing a stop faster than the film was rated gave images a richer contrast. TMAX P3200 is very tonal by nature, hence its very wide dynamic range. Tonality is great but I like some contrast in most of my work.

Vinyl Rhino © 2018 Johnny Martyr | Leica M6 TTL .85 | Leitz 90mm Summicron Pre-ASPH | Kodak TMAX P3200 | Kodak HC110b

Between the excellent lighting, half stop over-exposure and push processing, I think that contrast was nearly spot-on what I was looking for. I adjusted levels slightly in Photoshop, usually only pulling the blacks in and dodging and burning where appropriate.

Vinyl Rhino © 2018 Johnny Martyr | Leica M6 TTL .85 | Leitz 5cm 1.5 Summarit | Kodak TMAX P3200 | Kodak HC110b

P3200’s T-Grain is not as fine as Ilford’s Delta 3200 grain but that’s one of the things I love about this film. It makes no apologies for itself. It’s immediately recognizable, even to a non-photographer, as film. The clumps of silver are unmistakable. The depth, the soul. They’re present in liberal amounts.

I usually call it quits at 6400 but what’s crazy is that P3200 can be rated from something like 800 to 25,000 EI. Experimental shooters have even gotten wider ranges. What that means is that, if you like, P3200 could be the ONLY film in your bag, capable of shooting in sunlight into near pitch black darkness! P3200 is certainly a powerful weapon to keep in your arsenal! It’s unique, practical and versatile.

Happily, the New Kodak TMAX P3200 appears to be exactly the same old TMAX P3200 that we already knew and loved. No formula updates, no corner cutting, no bulls**t.

P3200 is back and it’s ready to rock!


About the author: Johnny Martyr is a premier East Coast film photographer. The opinions expressed in this article are solely those of the author. After an adventurous 15 year photographic journey, he now shoots exclusively on B&W 35mm film that he painstakingly hand-processes and digitizes. Choosing to work with only a select few clients per annum, Martyr’s uncommonly personalized process ensures unsurpassed quality as well as stylish, natural & timeless imagery that will endure for decades. You can find more of his work on his website and Flickr. This article was also published here.


Source: PetaPixel

First Photos Shot on Kodak’s Rebooted TMAX P3200 Film

Here’s a Dazzling Time-Lapse of Mt. Everest at Night

Here’s a Dazzling Time-Lapse of Mt. Everest at Night

Photographer and filmmaker Elia Saikaly has released a new time-lapse short film titled, Everest. It’s a dazzling look at the beauty of the world’s highest mountain at night.

While other climbers slept, Saikaly took several Canon DSLRs out into the dark and frigid nights to document the Himalayan skies seen by climbers trying to reach “the top of the world.”

Here’s what Saikaly has to say about the experience:

These time lapse images were captured as high as 6200m (camp 2) above sea level on Mt. Everest. We slept at 6000m for three consecutive nights on the summit of Mt. Lobuche East waiting for a glimpse of Everest from that vantage point. Around 11pm on the 2nd night, the skies opened up and the top of the world revealed herself in all of her glory.

Nowhere else on the planet have I ever seen the Milky Way so clear, so vivid and so very much alive. It takes a great deal of discipline to stay up all night capturing the magic for the world to experience. Cameras freeze. Shutters freeze. Batteries freeze. Humans freeze. The high altitude environment is debilitating at best. Your body is taking a constant beating by the low levels of oxygen in the atmosphere. The higher you climb of course, the worse this becomes.

Everything was shot with a Canon 1D C, two 5D Mark IIIs, a 5DS R, a 24mm lens, a 16mm lens, and an 11-24mm lens.

Saikaly released an earlier time-lapse short film about Mt. Everest five years ago, and that video has since received over 1 million views:

You can find more of Saikaly’s work on his website, Vimeo, and Instagram.

(via Elia Saikaly via CanonWatch)


Source: PetaPixel

Here’s a Dazzling Time-Lapse of Mt. Everest at Night

The Science of Exposure and Metering: Light’s Pathway from Scene to Sensor

The Science of Exposure and Metering: Light’s Pathway from Scene to Sensor

You’ve probably learned about the exposure triangle countless times by now. If you want a deeper understanding of the science of exposure, though, check out this 30-minute video by Filmmaker IQ.

“I wanted to take a bit of a different approach to exposure and think of it as a pathway of light,” founder John P. Hess tells PetaPixel. “In doing so I found some new revelations about the relationship between light and metering that don’t really get answered with the exposure triangle.”

Hess examines the pathway light takes to get from scene to sensor, a four-phase journey that includes scene luminance, lens modification, exposure (aperture and shutter speed), and recording sensitivity.

“Each of these aspects of the pathway of light is crucial toward creating the final image,” Hess concludes. “Light is all there is, whether you are carefully crafting it or snapping a selfie. This interplay of light that we’ve discussed is happening in every photograph.”

You can find more educational videos by Filmmaker IQ on its popular YouTube channel.


Source: PetaPixel

The Science of Exposure and Metering: Light’s Pathway from Scene to Sensor

These Volkswagen Beetle Photos Were Shot on a Table

These Volkswagen Beetle Photos Were Shot on a Table

Photographer Felix Hernandez has wowed the world for years with his large-scale photos created using small-scale models. Volkswagen recently turned to Hernandez’s talents for a series of photos showing a classic Beetle on a desert road. Everything was shot on a tabletop.

Hernandez carefully painted and prepared the models and tiny set leading up to the shoot. Here are some behind-the-scenes views:

Finally, here’s a 3.5-minute behind-the-scenes video with a much more in-depth look at how this “Love Beetle” project was done:


Source: PetaPixel

These Volkswagen Beetle Photos Were Shot on a Table

Here’s the Trailer for ‘Kodachrome’

Here’s the Trailer for ‘Kodachrome’

Netflix purchased the rights for the upcoming movie Kodachrome in September 2017, and today it just released the film’s 2.5-minute trailer. The movie is a story that’s centered around the final days of Kodachrome film.

The film stars Ed Harris as a bitter, dying old man who’s a seasoned photographer and estranged father. He and his son (Jason Sudeikis) reunite to take a road trip (with his nurse, Elizabeth Olsen) to develop the photographer’s Kodachrome film at the last Kodachrome-capable photo lab remaining in the country.

Ed Harris as the photographer in Kodachrome.

It’s a story based on A.G. Sulzberger’s 2010 New York Times article titled, “For Kodachrome Fans, Road Ends at Photo Lab in Kansas.” Here’s the synopsis:

Struggling A&R executive Matt (Jason Sudeikis) finds his world turned upside down when his estranged father’s nurse (Elizabeth Olsen) shows up unexpectedly in his office. Matt’s father, a famed bad-boy photojournalist (Ed Harris), is facing terminal cancer and his dying wish is for Matt to join him on a road trip from New York to Kansas to process his last rolls of Kodachrome film before the sole remaining lab closes and those captured moments are gone forever. Kodachrome tells the story of three damaged people coming to terms with themselves, each other, and a world swiftly changing from analog to digital.

You’ll be able to watch Kodachrome on Netflix starting on April 20th, 2018.


Source: PetaPixel

Here’s the Trailer for ‘Kodachrome’

Huawei P20 Pro: Leica Triple Camera, ISO 102400, DxOMark Score of 106

Huawei P20 Pro: Leica Triple Camera, ISO 102400, DxOMark Score of 106

The Chinese smartphone manufacturer Huawei has just unveiled the P20 Pro, a smartphone that “redefines intelligent photography.” The Leica triple camera onboard has trounced the other smartphones at DxOMark, scoring a highest-ever mark of 106.

The P20 Pro is the world’s first smartphone to feature a Leica triple camera system.

The system has the highest total pixel count of any smartphone on the market today. The main camera features a 40MP, 1/1.73″ RGB sensor behind a 27mm f/1.8 (35mm equiv.) lens. The secondary camera has a 20MP, 1/2.78″ monochrome sensor behind a 27mm f/1.6 (35mm equiv.) lens. And the telephoto camera has an 8MP, 1/4.4″ RGB sensor behind an 80mm f/2.4 (35mm equiv.) lens with optical image stabilization.

In low light, the P20 Pro is a monster, capturing photos with a sensitivity of up to ISO 102400.

ISO 1250 (left) and ISO 51200 (right).

With a goal of making professional-quality photography accessible to the masses, the P20 Pro uses a Master AI system that provides AI-driven photo features, including AI stabilization and AI-Assisted Composition (suggestions for framing group and landscape photos). The scene recognition identifies over 500 scenarios across 19 categories to automatically select camera setting for an optimal shot.

4D predictive focus helps the camera predict the movement of subjects and keep focus locked on them.

The phone can shoot 960fps super slow motion:

To help you capture fleeting moments without delay, the phone has an Ultra Snapshot feature: double-click the down volume button to shoot a photo in as little as 0.3 seconds, even when the screen is off.

Other features and specs include a Kirin 970 processor, 4K video recording, 6.1-inch screen with ultra-thin bezels, a 24MP selfie camera, AI beautification, 3D portrait lighting, and a 3400 mAh battery.

DxOMark has glowing things to say about the P20 Pro’s camera capabilities, writing that the phone is a “game changer” and that the triple camera system isn’t just a marketing gimmick.

“We are used to every new smartphone camera generation being slightly better than the previous one, but looking at the images and test results from the P20 Pro, it seems Huawei has skipped one or two generations,” DxOMark writes. “The results are simply that good. The P20 Pro’s triple camera setup is the biggest innovation we have seen in mobile imaging for quite some time and is a real game changer.”

Being able to pick the best camera for a specific shooting situation and computationally merge the image data from all three sensors means that the new Huawei beats the competition in virtually every category, taking the number one spots in both our Photo and Video rankings. The P20 Pro is particularly good in low light, when zooming, and for bokeh simulation, blowing its direct rivals out of the water. If you are looking for the current best camera in a smartphone, look no further.

Here’s what the updated DxOMark leaderboard looks like with the addition of the P20 Pro:

Here are some official sample photos captured with the P20 Pro:

Photo by James Yu/Huawei.
Photo by Joy Island/Huawei
Photo by Juan Jerez/Huawei
Photo by La Petite Touche/Huawei
Photo by Pan Chaoyue/Huawei
Photo by Yu Zhen/Huawei

Here’s a 2-minute video introducing the Huawei P20 Pro (and its smaller sibling, the P20):

The Huawei P20 Pro will be available (in Twilight, Pink Gold, Black, and Midnight Blue) to Europeans starting next month with a price tag of €899 (or about $1,120). No word yet on if or when the phone will be released in the United States.


Source: PetaPixel

Huawei P20 Pro: Leica Triple Camera, ISO 102400, DxOMark Score of 106