This is How Photorealistic Video Game Engines Are Now

This is How Photorealistic Video Game Engines Are Now

The asset library Quixel has released this new 2.5-minute cinematic short film titled “Rebirth.” It’s an eye-opening look at how photorealistic real-time rendering in video game engines is now.

To prepare for the project, Quixel spent a month in cold and wet locations in Iceland, scanning all kinds of objects found in the natural environment using. The team returned with over 1,000 scans that captured the details of the landscape.

Examples of Quixel photogrammetry scans. Screenshots by TechSpot.

Using the scans — a part of Quixel’s Megascans library — a team of three artists at Quixel created the 1:45 cinematic film in real-time using the power of the Unreal Engine 4 game engine.

“The high fidelity of the physically-based scans delivers results that are remarkably photorealistic,” Unreal Engine writes.

Here are some still frames from the short film:

Part of the realism was due to the use of a physical camera rig that allowed the creators to “film” in virtual reality.

“With UE 4.21 at the heart of the real-time pipeline, Quixel’s artists were able to iterate on the go, eliminating the need for previsualization or post-production,” Unreal says. “The team also built a physical camera rig that was able to capture movements in-engine using virtual reality, adding an enhanced dimension of realism to the short. All post-processing and color grading was completed directly within Unreal.”

The result of all this work and technology is a real-time film that rivals the photorealism of offline renders.

(via Unreal Engine via DPReview)


Source: PetaPixel

This is How Photorealistic Video Game Engines Are Now