This Guy Shot 50,000 Pics to Make an 81MP Photo of the Moon

This Guy Shot 50,000 Pics to Make an 81MP Photo of the Moon

Check out this incredible photo of the moon. It may look like it was captured using some ultra-advanced (and expensive) equipment, but it was actually created by astrophotography enthusiast Andrew McCarthy by capturing and combining 50,000 photos.

The Sacramento, California-based McCarthy shot the photos using two cameras: his Sony a7 II mirrorless camera and his ZWO ASI224MC (a $250 astro camera).

“The lit side of the moon was processed using 25 ’tiles’ that were stitched together in Photoshop,” the photographer tells PetaPixel. “Each ’tile’ was a stack of the best 50% of 2000 images captured with the ZWO.”

The stars and the dark portion of the moon were captured with the Sony a7 II.

“The dark side is around 13 tiles, each with the best of around 50 images,” McCarthy says. “The stars were captured with a stack of 50 shots with the Sony.”

A crop showing the details of the moon.

The stacks were blended using AutoStakkert!, and McCarthy then turned to Photoshop to process and stitch together the photo.

“A lot of selective masking, histogram stretching, and contrast adjustments were necessary to get the look I wanted,” he says.

You can find more of his amazing work on his Instagram account, @cosmic_background. McCarthy is the photographer who recently shot a beautiful Solar System family photo from his Sacramento backyard.


Source: PetaPixel

This Guy Shot 50,000 Pics to Make an 81MP Photo of the Moon

Thanks, Apple: ‘Bokeh’ is Now a Verb

Thanks, Apple: ‘Bokeh’ is Now a Verb

If you were annoyed by Apple’s pronunciation of the word ‘bokeh,’ then you may be doubly peeved by the company’s latest iPhone ad. This 38-second TV spot turns ‘bokeh’ into a verb.

In the ad, a mother is surprised to find that another woman has “bokeh’d” her child by using the iPhone’s Depth Control feature to blur him out in the background.

“Did you… bokeh my child?” she asks indignantly, causing the other mother to become flustered and apologetic.

“Depth Control on iPhone XS and iPhone XR lets you adjust the bokeh effect on backgrounds before or after you shoot,” Apple says. “So you can turn a cute portrait of two kids into a stunning portrait of one kid.”

Here’s Webster’s current definition for bokeh:

bokeh noun: the blurred quality or effect seen in the out-of-focus portion of a photograph taken with a narrow depth of field

Perhaps Webster will soon need to add a second definition:

bokeh verb: exclude (someone) from a photograph by blurring them into an unidentifiable figure in the out-of-focus background using a (real or simulated) shallow depth of field

The ad certainly does a good job of communicating what Depth Control does, but it seems that disgruntled photographers are revolting against this use of ‘bokeh’: at the time of this writing, the video has nearly 10,000 dislikes to 26,000 likes — an unusually high dislike rate of about 28%.

(via Apple via The Online Photographer)


Source: PetaPixel

Thanks, Apple: ‘Bokeh’ is Now a Verb

Nick Knight’s Glam Slam for Maison Margiela

Nick Knight’s Glam Slam for Maison Margiela
‘Reality Inverse’ is a short film a visual conversation between creative director John Galliano and photographer Nick Knight that is set to debut at the Serpentine Gallery in London. The film offers it’s viewers a unique, technicolor experience which marks a new chapter in the evolving language of Maison Margiela and connects it to the elements and philosophies established at the fashion house through recent collections, especially focusing on the technological age. With bright, neon hues and…

Keep on reading: Nick Knight’s Glam Slam for Maison Margiela
Source: V Magazine

Nick Knight’s Glam Slam for Maison Margiela

Spring Place x COYA Brought The Heat This NYFW

Spring Place x COYA Brought The Heat This NYFW
Spring Place took us on a vacation to Peru–well, sort of. The exclusive, members-only club invited COYA, the highly-awarded Latin American restaurant, to take over its NYC space for fashion week. COYA crafted a dining experience as immersive as it was loyal to its Peruvian heritage. New Yorkers were able to experience COYA’s unique Incan-inspired menu. Three highlights from their offerings that had been specifically curated for this partnership included Ceviche de Atún Chifa, Arroz Nikkei and…

Keep on reading: Spring Place x COYA Brought The Heat This NYFW
Source: V Magazine

Spring Place x COYA Brought The Heat This NYFW

How to Save 100,000 Cameras: A Look Inside Camera Rescue

How to Save 100,000 Cameras: A Look Inside Camera Rescue

Camera Rescue is a project based in Finland that’s working to rescue 100,000 analog cameras by 2020 in order to preserve them for future generations. Photographer Jordan Lockhart of Cameraville recently traveled to Tampere, Finland, and made this 10.5-minute behind-the-scenes video at the organization’s ambitious endeavor.

Lockhart sat down with Camera Rescue core team member Juho Leppänen to talk about what his organization is doing.

In “rescuing” a camera, Camera Rescue finds film cameras that are broken or out of use, repairs them, and returns them to the market for a second chance at life. At the time of this writing, a counter on the project’s homepage shows that it has rescued 46,641 cameras in this way thus far.

One of the biggest challenges faced by Camera Rescue is the lack of qualified camera repair technicians, so they’re putting large efforts toward teaching the younger generation the skills of fixing cameras so that they’re not lost as current technicians age and retire.

And regarding larger issues facing the film photography industry as a whole, Camera Rescue believes there are three things that need to be addressed: (1) there needs to be newly designed mechanical shutters, (2) there needs to be new scanner technology in both hardware and software, and (3) there needs to be new automated film development machines for C-41, B&W, and E6 to keep the barrier of entry low for newcomers.

“[W]e are just getting started,” Camera Rescue writes. “From one to thousands at a time, we rescue cameras from any time period old or new, working or broken. Trade in your old or unwanted camera equipment for cash, and help us with our goal of rescuing 100,000 cameras by 2020.”


Source: PetaPixel

How to Save 100,000 Cameras: A Look Inside Camera Rescue

If Iconic Space Photos Had Been Shot with a Smartphone Camera…

If Iconic Space Photos Had Been Shot with a Smartphone Camera…

What would iconic space probe photos of celestial bodies in our solar system look like if they had been shot with an ordinary smartphone camera? Astronomer Scott Manley made this 12.5-minute video that explains the answer, which is: “not much.”

The beautiful photos of planets and moons that you’ve seen were captured with specialized cameras on spacecraft that are much more like telescopes than like iPhone cameras.

For example, in August 2015, NASA shared a beautiful photo of the Moon passing in front of Earth that was captured by the camera on its DSCOVR Earth observation satellite.

But this photo was captured from a mind-boggling distance of nearly a million miles from Earth.

“The field of view of your typical everyday camera that you would find in a smartphone is about 60 degrees,” Manley says. “The camera onboard the DSCOVR spacecraft is called EPIC and it has a field of view of less than one degree. And of course that field of view is optimized because it’s designed to look at the Earth and little else.”

Manley shows various examples of the large distances famous shots were actually taken at using NASA’s Eyes on the Solar System, a free app that “lets you explore the planets, their moons, asteroids, comets and the spacecraft exploring them from 1950 to 2050.”

“This project started out as an idea to take classic, famous images from space history and try and redesign them, reframe them so that they would have the same look as if they were taken with an iPhone,” Manley says. “But I very quickly realized that the field of view of most cameras mounted on spacecraft was so tiny, so minuscule that what we would really be left with was a tiny small disc of light suspended in a giant black background.”


Source: PetaPixel

If Iconic Space Photos Had Been Shot with a Smartphone Camera…

Luar’s FW19 Is For The Werking Girl

Luar’s FW19 Is For The Werking Girl
Luar’s designer, Raul Lopez, answered the question that many people ask but haven’t received a definite answer on yet: Are the 2000’s back? And if so, are they bringing low-rise pants with them? The answer to both of those, is yes, Lopez concluded with his recent NYFW /r ə ‘dem(p)SH(ə)n/

Inspired by a time of capitalist lure, mini skirts, short bangs, Paris Hilton and MySpace, Luar expressed his admiration of the diamanté crowded era through fur trim, asymmetric skort-trouser combination…

Keep on reading: Luar’s FW19 Is For The Werking Girl
Source: V Magazine

Luar’s FW19 Is For The Werking Girl

Ep. 312: New Bodies, New Lenses and Old Kodak – and more

Ep. 312: New Bodies, New Lenses and Old Kodak – and more



Episode 312 of the PetaPixel Photography Podcast.
Download MP3 –  Subscribe via iTunesGoogle Playemail or RSS!

Featured: Nikon Ambassador, Charmi Peña

In This Episode

If you subscribe to the PetaPixel Photography Podcast in iTunes, please take a moment to rate and review us and help us move up in the rankings so others interested in photography may find us.

Show Opener:
Nikon Ambassador, Charmi Peña, opens the show.  Thanks Charmi!

Sponsors:
– Get 20% off at BenroUSA.com with code PetaPixel20
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Stories:
Kodak does it yet again. (#)

Canon unveils its EOS RP before going even smaller. (#)

Panasonic enters the full-frame mirrorless arena with its S1 and S1R. (#)

Bowens just won’t die. (#)

Panasonic unveils three new lenses for its new mirrorless system. (#)

Pentax drops a couple of new lenses on us. (#)

This sweet filter will have you seeing red. (#)

Outtake

Connect With Us

Thank you for listening to the PetaPixel Photography Podcast! Connect with me, Sharky James on TwitterInstagram and Facebook (all @LensShark) as we build this community.

We’d love to answer your question on the show. Leave us an audio question through our voicemail widget, comment below or via social media. But audio questions are awesome!

You can also cut a show opener for us to play on the show! As an example: “Hi, this is Matt Smith with Double Heart Photography in Chicago, Illinois, and you’re listening to the PetaPixel Photography Podcast with Sharky James!”


Source: PetaPixel

Ep. 312: New Bodies, New Lenses and Old Kodak – and more

How to Rate and Flag Photos with Your Voice on a Mac

How to Rate and Flag Photos with Your Voice on a Mac

Want to navigate through a large set of photos and assign star ratings using only your voice instead of your keyboard? It’s extremely easy to set up for any image organization software if you use a Mac. Here’s a 6.5-minute tutorial by photographer Tony Hoffer on how to set this up.

Hoffer’s walkthrough shows how to set things up for culling in Photo Mechanic, but the steps are identical for other apps like Adobe Lightroom and Adobe Bridge.

All you need to do is visit the Keyboard and Accessibility sections of your System Preferences.

In Keyboard, simply make sure Dictation is set to On. This screen also shows you the shortcut for activating dictation.

In Accessibility, click the Dictation Commands button.

Now you can choose the voice commands you’d like to turn on, the app they should apply to (e.g. Photo Mechanic, Lightroom, Bridge, etc), and the keyboard shortcut the voice command should be translated into.

By setting the word “five” to the keyboard key “5”, you can have your app give your photo 5 stars simply by saying “five.” Likewise, if you set the word “back” to the left arrow key, you can navigate back to the previous photo simply by saying “back.”

Watch Hoffer’s video above if you’d like to see the detailed step-by-step process in setting this up as well as a demo of voice culling in action.


Source: PetaPixel

How to Rate and Flag Photos with Your Voice on a Mac